"Wish I'd had pet insurance" story

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from GoneToTheDogs39. Show GoneToTheDogs39's posts

    "Wish I'd had pet insurance" story

     

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from GoneToTheDogs39. Show GoneToTheDogs39's posts

    The above article is from:

    http://blog.embracepetinsurance.com/ (above article is from)

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re:

    Pet insurance is great for anyone who, like the woman in this story,who can't shell out a lot of money at once.  However, if you could pay for things like that as they happen, you'd spend a lot less on healthcare for your pet over its lifetime without insurance.  

    For instance, we've spent about $6500 on Gracie's care including a $4000 knee surgery in three years.  If we assume another $4000 surgery and $200/yr on other vet expenses, that's a lifetime medical expense of about $13,000.  (Let's hope she doesn't tear the other knee, but the doc gave us a 50/50 shot so we'll assume she will.)  Anyway, if we'd gotten pet insurance for $100/month her whole 13 years that would add up to $1200 * 13 = $15,600, or about two grand extra for the luxury of paying monthly.

    So, if we could not have paid $4000 at the time for surgery we, like the woman in the story, we would have been sol without insurance, but it probably won't save you money overall unless your pet needs three surgeries in their lifetime.

    Its definitely worth it if you are getting insurance for the affordable monthly payments.  However, it might not be the cheaper way to go over the life of the pet especially if your breed is expensive to insure like Labs.  I haven't looked into the cost effectiveness for other breeds.
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from GoneToTheDogs39. Show GoneToTheDogs39's posts

    pet health insurance


     
    I think if you are a new pet owner it's a good idea,  things are different now,  pets tend to live longer, and more treatments are available to keep your pet comfortable.

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re:

    It's definitely an individual decision, but I didn't want anyone to assume it wouldhave money over the life of their pet; in my research, it seems that it's a low monthly cost, but higher overall expense over the life of the pet even if they need up to three surgeries.  However, insurance might end up being cheaper overall if a pet needs chronic expensive monthly care for a long time.

    It's a great way to make sure you can always give your pet what it needs if large random expenditures aren't going to be possible.
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from GoneToTheDogs39. Show GoneToTheDogs39's posts

    Re:

    All the dogs I've had, none of them needed anything but routine care until they were over the age of 7,  so having the pet health insurance may end up being a wash, I've heard good things and bad, I would check with your vet if you are a new pet owner regarding the pros and cons of pet health insurance, see what he recommends.
    After spending much time in the emergency vet clinic waiting room and conversing with other pet owners,  I think it is at least worth checking out.

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re:

    When considering pet insurance, ask yourself if you could cover $5000 at a time for care a time or two over the life of your pet.  If you can, insurance is probably not cost effective over the life of your pet.  If, however, that would break the bank at any given time but you'd be able to cover a reasonably low monthly pet medical expense, insurance is the obvious choice.
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from GoneToTheDogs39. Show GoneToTheDogs39's posts

    Re:

    Pet health insurance usually covers some of routine care,  your figures are way off,  at the worst it will be a wash,  however if the pet lives long enough it will definitely be cost effective,  because just like people they tend to develop health conditions after the age of 50 (10 in dog years).
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re:

    I ran the numbers for Gracie (above) and its not likely to be a wash.  I know you despise me, but for pity's sake I want people to consider that it might not be the most cost effective thing IF they are able to afford expensive things as they come up.  If you disagree, fine, but my numbers for my finances and my dog are unlikely to be way off.
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re:

    You just can't say that I make a godo point, can you.
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from GoneToTheDogs39. Show GoneToTheDogs39's posts

    Re:

    Insurance for health, life, pets,  home, short term disabilty, long term disability etc.
    These are all individual decisions, some like to roll the dice,  some don't, there is no right or wrong answer.

     You might be better off without it or you may be better off with it, no one can predict the future.

     You make good points, I make good points.

      People should do whatever gives them peace of mind after evaluating all the options.

     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re:

    Agreed.  

    But, I'm not talking about an unpredictable future.  As you point out, that's always the dilema re insurance.

    My point is that as part of their evaluation, people should figure out how much over the life of their pet they'd be paying in insurance not just consider the monthly cost.

    I was disgusted we didn't have Gracie covered by insurance when she needed surgery until I figured out her lifetime insurance cost.
     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from SSBride09. Show SSBride09's posts

    Re:

    Kar, I completely agree with your numbers on pet insurance.  We have two dogs so if we didn't have the $10k in the bank to cover a major surgery should something go wrong with both at the same time at any point I would definately get the insurance.  However, after running the numbers it makes much more sense for us to take the financial risk that our otherwise healthy dogs will only have a few major expenses like Gracie's surgery in their lifetimes.

    Of course there will be people who come out ahead by purchasing insurance, but these will be few and far between.  Otherwise the insurance companies would not be in business of course.  That said insurance is a great option for people who don't have the luxury of having the means available to them all at once in an emergency.
     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re:

    Thanks, SS; sometimes I feel like I'm in the Twilight Zone here.
     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from miscricket. Show miscricket's posts

    Re:

    Kar..I completely agree as well. My vet's office has a couple of signs for pet insurance. When I first started taking my cats there, I asked him about it. He said, really, it's a bad investment for someone like me who keeps up with vet appointments and addresses any problems before they become bigger. It's also a pain for them to deal with.

    Just for kicks, I ran the numbers and got a quote for both my cats. For me, it was a rip off. There were so many copays, deductables and uncovered percentages that after I read th whole thing I started to wonder what I was paying a monthy deductable for.

    Really, when you own a pet, you need to make sure you can afford it's care. I have set aside a separate account which I only use for vet and animal health related expenses...my own little "insurance policy" if you will. 
     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re:

    Miscricket and SS, I think your last paragraphs encapsulate the bottom line for all pet owners considering what they want to do with respect to owning a pet and buying insurance.
     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from GoneToTheDogs39. Show GoneToTheDogs39's posts

    pet insurance, pros and cons

     Over the last 5 years pet insurance has improved and is well worth considering, especially if you are a new pet owner.
    I certainly wish I had gotten it for my bladder stone boy!  Some plans even pay toward the cost of prescription pet food.

     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from GoneToTheDogs39. Show GoneToTheDogs39's posts

    More glad I had pt insurance stories!

    old post/deleted

     

     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from SUFan45. Show SUFan45's posts

    Re: Pet Insurance

    When we got out dog I looked into pet insurance & found it very confusing.  We don't have a pure bred dog but some insurance companies have restictions on breed specific genetic conditions, plus the co-pays, deductibles, annual limit. We ultimately decided to set up a separate savings account to cover any vet costs.  We put in an initial chuck of money & then contribute to it monthly.  I know not everyone is able to set aside an initial investment (although I think people so be realistic about if they can financially afford a pet before getting one) but I felt this was the best arrangement for us.  That way the money is there if our dog has a major expense.  If not we still have the money, not the insurance company. It's worth looking into, in the long run it just wasn't for us. 

     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from GoneToTheDogs39. Show GoneToTheDogs39's posts

    Re: Pet Insurance Worth Buying?

      

     http://www.nextavenue.org/blog/pet-insurance-worth-buying


    "Pet insurance is for people who cannot stand the thought of having to put down their pet for economic, not health, reasons," he says. "And it's for those who want to offer their pets medical treatments, such as chemotherapy, but can not afford the out-of-pocket costs."   (Excerpt from article)



     

     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from framerican51008. Show framerican51008's posts

    Re:

    Kind of a related topic... Has anyone ever heard of a grant or anything you can get for pet bills??  My sister racked up thousands just diagnosing her dog's brain tumor, so I thought I'd do some research for her...  Time to google!  Thanks

     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from GoneToTheDogs39. Show GoneToTheDogs39's posts

    Re:

    http://www.massresources.org/pet-care-assistance.html

    http://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Shadow-Fund/146912702009312?sk=info

    http://www.fairydogparents.org/

    http://www.humanesociety.org/animals/resources/tips/trouble_affording_pet.html

    I'm not exactly sure what you are looking for.  I assume the dog needs surgery and continued care.   Hope this helps.

     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from GoneToTheDogs39. Show GoneToTheDogs39's posts

    Re:

    http://vetmed.tamu.edu/clinical-trials/canine-oncology

     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from GoneToTheDogs39. Show GoneToTheDogs39's posts

    Re:

    In response to framerican51008's comment:

    Kind of a related topic... Has anyone ever heard of a grant or anything you can get for pet bills??  My sister racked up thousands just diagnosing her dog's brain tumor, so I thought I'd do some research for her...  Time to google!  Thanks

     

     

    Canine Brain Tumor Clinical Trials Program

     

    Investigators: G. Elizabeth Pluhar, DVM, PhD and John Ohlfest, PhD
    Eligible cases: Dogs with meningiomas and glioma
    Contact Info: Clinical Investigation Center, 612-624-2485 or vcic@umn.edu

    The goal of the Canine Brain Tumor Clinical Trial Program is to offer cutting edge therapy to dogs intended to preserve quality of life and improve long-term survival rates. Additionally, we will use the information gained from treating dogs to design similar treatments for people with brain tumors. The majority of the cost associated with these experimental brain tumor therapies is paid for by grants from foundation and government agencies including the Childrens Cancer Research Fund, the Randy Shaver Cancer Research and Community Fund, the National Institutes of Health, the American Cancer Society, and the American Brain Tumor Association.

    We have treated almost 70 dogs, and are still collecting data to be able to draw conclusions about the effectiveness of the therapies. However, we have found that dogs with meningiomas and low grade glioma respond well to the combination of surgery and immunotherapy, and we are prolonging the disease free interval for dogs with high grade glioma while providing an excellent quality of life. We continue to actively recruit dogs with either meningioma or glioma for currently funded projects. We are always happy to accept charitable donations to help further our research efforts. (See sidebar for more on Batman, first case enrolled in these trials.)

    See the links to the right to learn more about the trials. To request enrollment of a dog in a trial, the dog's veterinarian should fill out the form under "Apply for Brain Tumor Clinical Trials Program". You may also call 612-624-2485 to speak with the Clinical Investigation Center.

    To donate to the research effort, click here and select œnew gift then designate the gift is for the CVM canine brain tumor clinical trials effort. Or you can contact Bill Venne, chief development officer, at 612-625-8480 or venne025@umn.edu.

     
  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from GoneToTheDogs39. Show GoneToTheDogs39's posts

    Re: Dog faces autoimmune issues

    By Dr. John De Jong / Ask the Vet | Sunday, November 4, 2012 | http://www.bostonherald.com | Lifestyle 

    Dear Dr. John,

    My husband and I own an adorable 4 year-old teacup poodle who suddenly started bleeding from the mouth and later had some bruising. The first vet who saw her thought she might have an oral infection and started her on antibiotics. Once she started to vomit some brown material, I called the emergency clinic and they advised me to bring her in right away in case she had gotten into some mouse poison. This made no sense to us since we do not have any near us. Our two cats do a good enough job of keeping the mice away.

    The clinic ran some blood tests and found our little dog to be severely anemic but that she also had a very low platelet count. They told us that she had some kind of an autoimmune disease and started her on Prednisone, and some other medications to stop the vomiting, and Pepcid for her stomach. They also changed the type of antibiotic that we give her.

    We just got news today that a second blood test done earlier in the day showed that she was more anemic with even lower platelets and that she needed a transfusion. What should we do? Can she survive all of this since she is such a tiny dog?

    We were told that her chances were 50/50 and we want to do what is right if she has a chance. Thanks. M.S.

    Dear M.S.:

    The two conditions that come to mind are either immune mediated hemolytic anemia (IMHA) or idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura/immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). Both are autoimmune conditions that have no known cause. ITP is more common in small female dogs. In these two conditions, the body attacks its own red blood cells or platelets destroying them and leading to bleeding and bruising conditions as you experienced with your little dog. The treatment of choice for both conditions is to initially give corticosteroids such as Prednisone, and if that does not help, then other immunosuppressants may be given. A transfusion is needed if the anemia becomes too profound and is meant to sustain the patient until the medications kick in. It is hard for me to suggest what you should do since I do not know what the values are in the blood work. However, I do think it is worth a try to proceed with the transfusion to buy some time for the medications to work and see if things can change. I have seen these kinds of cases go both well and badly, which gives credence to the 50/50 outlook that you were given. Size may not necessarily matter regarding outcome even though she is a tiny dog. Either way, I think you will have an outcome one way or another relatively soon. I wish you luck and hope she pulls through!

    Article URL: http://www.bostonherald.com/entertainment/lifestyle/view.bg?articleid=1061172231

     
Sections
Shortcuts

Share