1. You have chosen to ignore posts from minipup. Show minipup's posts

    Re: Bringing home new puppy

    I am so excited to get him and to share my journey. Here he is at 7 weeks. We pick him up next Saturday.


     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Bringing home new puppy

    What a cutie pie!  So glad you are starting your journey with us.  Keep the photos coming; he will change overnight.

    Remember, be patient - at 8 weeks old he can't feel when he has to go until he is actually in the act so there's no way he can learn to tell you he has to go out for a few more weeks.  This was my biggest disappointment and source of frustration because I didn't realize that I had been expecting the physiologically impossible because I'd heard of dogs who had learned potty training in a day.  What I didn't understand was that the operative word there was dogs, and an 8 week old puppy is not the same as an adult.

    Did I answer your concerns about the crying/whining in the crate?  That face will be hard to resist, but you can do it if we did!
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from rk512. Show rk512's posts

    Re: Bringing home new puppy

    a couple of things i would recommend that worked for me:

    I would suggest having the breeder send a blanket from the mother and for a few weeks wrap the blanket in a hot water bottle and put in the crate at night.  he/she will feel the warmth and smell the mom.  worked great for my 9 week old puppy.

    also make sure you take the pup out the same door everytime.  that teaches them to go to that door.  my pup sits in front of the door each time she needs to go out without any barking or fuss.
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from rk512. Show rk512's posts

    Re: Bringing home new puppy

    In Response to Re: Bringing home new puppy:
    Dumb BDC shifts the photos to the right, but what can ya do.  I think you, uh, get the picture. ;) Oh, about food, sorry - got so wrapped up with the crate issue I forgot about the rest.  There's another recent thread about a new dog owner researching food, and she has an excellent list of healthy brands.  You can't go wrong with any of those, but be watchful for allergies.  Itchy paws and/or ears can indicate a problem with the food.  (Gracie is allergic to duck.)  Stay away from anything with corn in it.  Most well known brands have it as the first ingredient.  It's a cheap filler that is bad for dogs. Thanks for the compliments on Gracie.  She is the apple of our eye, but it WAS a hard road even though we started off with a great puppy with an amazing personality.
    Posted by kargiver

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from rk512. Show rk512's posts

    Re: Bringing home new puppy

    a raw diet is the best food you can give your pup.  there are lots of wonderful raw diets out there.  i would recommend Stella and Chewys.  comes in frozen patties that are complete meals.  Very easy to feed. A little more expensive that dry foods but well worth it.
    you won't have to worry about allergies.  there are no grains.
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from Janie123. Show Janie123's posts

    Re: Bringing home new puppy

    There is an extra blessing to adopting an older dog, and giving him or her a second chance at life. 

    Animal shelters and dog rescue groups are full of healthy, loving, wonderful dogs who are waiting for a new home.  They range in age from a few months, a year or two, to mid-adult to seniors.  They may be purebreds or mixed breeds.

    Their reasons for being surrendered for adoption may be home foreclosure, owner going into nursing home, or more irresponsible reasons such as "no time" or "moving."  It is not the dogs' fault, and good homes are needed.

    While it may be fun to buy a puppy, rescuing an adult dog in need is very rewarding.  You become part of the solution to the homeless pet tragedy, rather than being part of the problem of breeding excess dogs when so many already exists who need homes and are being put to sleep.
     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from Novembride. Show Novembride's posts

    Re: Bringing home new puppy

    He's soooo cute!!  One more tipp, if you don't have it already with a dog in the house, buy enzymatic carpet/floor cleaner.  Buy the BIG bottle.  Even after they're trained, there are illness and other episodes when it comes in handy. 
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Bringing home new puppy

    Nature's Miracle, indeed, is a necessity.  And, do buy it in bulk.  Gracie still vomits (and chooses our $$$ oriental carpet as her favorite spot) and occassionally has an accident in her crate.  And, it gets out any organic stain (like wine), too.
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from minipup. Show minipup's posts

    Re: Bringing home new puppy

    Good idea Novembride and Kargiver. After much research, my husband and I have decided to feed him Blue Buffalo, has anyone heard of the brand?
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Bringing home new puppy

    minipup, we feed Gracie Blue Buffalo.

    If you go to their website you can get a $5 coupon.

    I think their Wilderness line is the most nutritious, but Gracie has issues with chicken (her p00 stinks to the high heavens on it meaning she doesn't digest it well), and instead of trying the other Wilderness varieties, I decided to put her on their large breed adult formula for her joints (it has glucosamine and chondroitin) so hopefully by the time she's of the age where it's usually a problem she'll not be in pain.

    They have a puppy line, but I think the Wilderness one is for all life stages...not sure.  They have a good website and I've had a great personal experience with their customer service (via email).

    PETCO carries everything BB makes. (Not all stores that carry BB carry everything.)

    Gracie didn't like dry food and even avoided eating until she was absolutely starved every night (we didn't know why she was waiting) until we started wetting it and letting it soak a bit (we learned at the kennel).  Then, she couldn't get enough and eats first thing in the morning!  It's a myth that wet food causes cavities so don't worry about that.  Dogs do need regular dental cleaning, though - I recommend the wipes.
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Bringing home new puppy

    In Response to Re: Bringing home new puppy:
    I agree with Janie123, also, just plain old white vinegar can help remove stains/odors. There are a lot of quality dog foods out there, some can be very expensive.
    Posted by robingirl


    Robin, it helps, but it does not eliminate odors.  The enzymes in the Nature's Miracle actually break down the accident so that it doesn't exist anymore, not even a molecule.  If you're potty training, it's vital to get rid of every bit of the problem or the pet will return to that spot.  Vinegar cleans things OK, but it doesn't totally eliminate the scent for a super charged sniffer like a dog has.  NM is expensive, no doubt, but it's the only way to get it all out, not "help."  You need it at the beginning if you have carpets, no getting around it.  Of course, I suppose you CAN get around it, but the stain and smell will still be there even long after you douse it in vinegar.

    I agree, however, that there are super expensive "perfect" dog foods out there that are out of reach for many pet owners.  Me included.  BB is not cheap, but it's not super expensive, either.   If money were no object, I'd have her on something else, probably a safely processed raw diet.  But, she's healthy and happy on BB, and there's no corn in it, so I'm happy enough and already spending a bit more than I'd hoped to on dog food.
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from pinkkittie27. Show pinkkittie27's posts

    Re: Bringing home new puppy

    Nature's Miracle is a must-have, and the best thing about it is that it doesn't smell. So many cleaners stink of perfume, and vinegar smells like, well, vinegar! Nature's Miracle just cleans the mess up, no smell left behind.
    They make a "wood floor" formula and the regular formula, but I found the regular formula is just fine on wood floors.

    what Kar said about the whining is true- you just have to be strong. It's going to be sad to hear him cry, but just know that you're doing what's best for him.

    My aunt used to have a mini schnauzer, and my uncle now has one. They can get terrible separation anxiety if you give into the whining. My aunt's dog used to whine and howl endlessly when she would leave him at our house to dog sit, it was terrible. My uncle's doesn't cry and howl when he leaves because he never ever gave into the whining. Just goes to show that it makes all the difference


    Since schnauzers do require some grooming, my recommendation is that you get your puppy used to baths ASAP. I gave Max a bath once a week with gentle puppy shampoo just so that he'd learn to behave in the tub while he was too small to put up much of a fight. He still doesn't like being wet, but he takes the bath like a champ every time, and LOVES getting dried off with the towel.

    Bathe him once a week with very gentle puppy shampoo (I like the oatmeal ones), followed by a good brushing and blow dry. Lots of praise and treats when he does well. I found that having a spoonful of peanut butter (Trader Joe's makes one that's sugar-free) for them to lick will do wonders to help keep them still in the tub and for the blow-dryer, and help them associate the bath and grooming with good, yummy things.

    Get him used to the sound of electric clippers by just turning on a pair and leaving it that way for a few minutes. You can also hold the handle against him so that he gets used to the vibration. Again, if you can associate it with something tasty like peanut butter, it helps.
    Your groomer will thank you!
     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Bringing home new puppy

    Yes, please do not turn away from the Nature's Miracle when you see the price tag.  After you set a stain with vinegar or other cleaning agent, NM won't work.

    To add to Pink's great advice on conditioning to tolerate (if not love) baths, also play with your puppy's, ears, mouth, and toes as part of your regular interaction with him so you don't end up with a dog averse to having particular body parts touched.  (Our neighbor's dog growls if you touch his feet, for instance.)  Not only will your groomer be thankful, your vet will be, too.  And, YOU, if you try to cut his nails yourself along with ear and teeth cleaning.  Also, teach him early to give in to your gently laying him on his side and holding him there (love the peanut butter idea).  If he ever gets hurt and you need to inspect/clean/etc. a wound, you don't want THAT to be the first time he has to lay still for you. 

    Oh, and be prepared, they will get hurt and sick.  Life will go on - no need to freak out (like I did) over everything.  Gracie caught her ear on a barbed wire and bled from the rip for 2 hours (she seemed totally unaware).  She split a nail right up the middle and could barely walk on it (it fell off and everything).  She got seriously cracked pads after walking in the snow a month because we didn't know about Musher's Secret (protective paw wax) and, again, could barely walk on them.  She had an allergic reaction to a tennis ball she ripped up and had hives from stem to stern for about 2 weeks even with Benedryl.  She had an allergic reaction to the duck in BB's duck flavored food and her feet itched for 2 weeks.  And, just recently, I clipped a nail into the quick.  I felt sooooo bad!   And, don't forget the ear infections and urinary tract infection!

    Oh, speaking of UTIs, we caused that.  We gave her Lawn Protect pills to save the grass from being burned, and it caused a buildup of protein and mineral deposits (tiny sharp pieces) in her urine which scratched her urethra and invited an infection.  So, whatever they say on those bottles it's NOT SAFE.  I'm so embarrassed and sad we did that to her, but we didn't know better, and trusted the company's claim of safety.
     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from minipup. Show minipup's posts

    Re: Bringing home new puppy

    What brands of toothpaste and shampoo do you all recommend? I am heading out tonight to buy some for him.

    Also, Kargiver, that reminds me regarding paws in the winter. Is there a way to keep them from getting too cold and cracking, or are they already protected enough? He has a vet appointment on Saturday, so I am sure he can answer all of these questions, but any advice on here would be much welcomed as well!
     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Bringing home new puppy

    Get tooth wipes, whatever brand.  And, I like Buddy Wash shampoo, lavender mint.

    Musher's Secret will protect their pads in the winter, keeping them safe from road salt, cold, and snow. If your pup does develop a problem, Bag Balm works well (morning and night massages) and was recommended by our vet when Gracie had her cracked pads.  She licks it, but the vet said it was OK in small amounts.  It's not recommended for puppies or small dogs to be outside for long periods of time in the cold weather so you don't have to worry about more than that.  In fact, maybe you don't even need the MS.  Depends on where and how long you walk with him.  If it's on the road where there's salt, yes, you need it for sure.  Road salt hurts their paws.  Gracie takes long walks (miles) in the wintry woods with DH so we have to be more conscious of her pads getting cracked and the skin between her toes getting frost bitten.

    Robingirl, we also feed the frozen marrow bones to Gracie as a treat, and they keep her entertained for hours.  Just wanted to say freezing them kills any parasites that might be in the raw meat so never feed them to the dog raw if they haven't been frozen first.  And, Price Chopper sells them in the meat cooler regularly, but you can ask for them anywhere.
     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from LLTyrrell. Show LLTyrrell's posts

    Re: Bringing home new puppy

    I've had my "puppy" for just over a year. I love this thread! I also can't believe how much she has grown, I'm so glad I took so many pictures when we first got her! One thing that has come in very handy and has been a lifesaver with the white rugs we have in our apartment is a steam cleaner. We got it as a wedding gift but it has saved us so much money (as opposed to renting one). I still clean up the stains when they happen but every couple weeks I steam clean and we're back to new :-). I'd highly recommend investing in one now!
     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from pinkkittie27. Show pinkkittie27's posts

    Re: Bringing home new puppy

    If your little schnauzer is anything like the ones I know, he'll LOVE the snow! Musher's Secret is great. For my little dog, I bought MuttLuks, which are little boots to protect his paws from cold, salt and ice, but it's really not worth buying something like that until he or she is full grown. And you might want to get a coat for the nasty winter days (not just to keep your dog warm, but to also cut down on the whole wet dog situation), but it's impossible to buy a coat unless you can try it on the dog, so that can wait til he/she comes home.

    For shampoo, I'm not really picky about brand, I just try to look for the most organic thing they have, because I know a little is going to get licked up no matter what. Dr. Bronner's Magic Soap, the baby formula or the lavendar one, is really good, plus you can use it for just about everything, not just the dog.

    And I agree with Kar that the tooth wipes are easiest, but I wouldn't buy any until the teething phase is over. for now, just use a damp paper towl to get the puppy used to having something put in their mouths.

    another helpful tip:
    DO NOT ever use your hands as toys. Wrestling is okay, but never ever let the puppy put his/her teeth on your hands. If they try, just say no, and get up and walk away. That can lead to biting problems very, very quickly. When they're tiny, it can seem cute when they try to play with your fingers, but it won't seem so cute when they're full grown and looking for attention.
     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Bringing home new puppy

    Oh, yeah!  Don't do ANYTHING you think is cute now but definitely won't be when they are adults.  You will have a devil of a time breaking habits that you used to reinforce with positive feedback before it got not so cute.  For a lab, I had to make sure she never jumped on people even when she was 15 lbs.  A 15 lb puppy can't knock someone over, but an 85-90 lb bundle of love can break a neck.  So, no jumping from DAY 1.
     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from minipup. Show minipup's posts

    Re: Bringing home new puppy

    This is all such wonderful advice! I will make sure to bookmark this.

    I have started a list of questions for our first vet visit, but do any of you have questions you suggest I ask him on the first visit?

    TY.

    BTW, his name will be Cooper :)
     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Bringing home new puppy

    Cooper, what a cute name!

    If you miss anything at the vet's you can always call their office and ask or post here when you think of a question.  It's not like if you don't get 100% of your questions asked and answered in that 15 minutes you're doomed.  Good thing, 'cause I guarantee on your way home you'll think of at least 1 more you "should have" asked.

    Ask them to show you the angle at which Cooper's nails should be clipped (so they don't end up splitting) and to show you how to identify where the quick starts (so when you cut his nails you don't hit that painful blood supply).  Hopefully, he'll need a trim when you take him, but if not, have them go through the motions for you and at least show you the quick.  He's got dark nails so it's going to be a challenge.

    Bring treats to the doctor's office and make it fun.  Praise in a cheerful voice, and if he appears frightened do NOT change your tone to "are you OK?" - keep it cheerful.  If you change your tone, he'll say, "Gosh, there really must be something to be concerned about because my owner is concerned, too."  (General rule, not just at the doc's.)  Never act funny around anything you don't want him to be afraid of (loud noises, thunder, etc.)

    When Cooper is on the leash he should be kept at your side (keep leash very short), not at arm's and leash's length away, pulling/exploring in an 8 foot circle around you.

     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from Novembride. Show Novembride's posts

    Re: Bringing home new puppy

    I brought a page of questions to the vet with me on the first visit, as he is my first dog.  She was really great and took the list from me and answered them one by one.  Can't remember all, but here goes...

    Wet food or dry food?  brand?  how often to feed?  how much?  what to use for treats?
    Vaccination schedule?  what, when, side effects, etc.
    when to neuter?
    flea/tick prevention
    Grooming basics - how often to bathe, when to brush, teeth brushing, ear cleaning, nail clipping
    miscellaneous crate training questions
    how long/often to exercise him
    any breed specific health issues to keep an eye out for

    It seemed like I had a million at the time. 
    Do you have pet insurance for him? 

     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Bringing home new puppy

    Word to the wise, believe it or not, there are vets that ascribe to the idea that wet food is bad for their teeth.  I've read very compelling evidence to the contrary and Gracie's vet concurs - it's totally a mythical connection.  So, when you ask about wet v dry food, if they say anything about the teeth, I'd think about seeing another vet.

    Good questions, Nov.  I recommend pet insurance, too, although, we don't have it.  We have spent a ton already.  Office visits aren't cheap, and you can see by the number of ailments she's had in a year and a half...

    Ask at what age he should be neutered and get their estimated cost.  Look into Tufts Vet School for it; they have a neutoring/spaying portion of their curriculum that occurs at the same time every year (and no other time).  If Cooper will be the right age at that time, it's free to have the students (under direct supervision) do it.  We'd have taken Gracie, but it wasn't the right time of year so we ended up spending about $600.  It's cheaper for the boys, though!

    ETA:  Oops, just noticed "when to neuter" was on your list.  Sorry! 
     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from Novembride. Show Novembride's posts

    Re: Bringing home new puppy

    Angell Memorial in Boston also has a very affordable spay/neuter program.  Puppy's procedure there cost about $175 including bloodwork, medication and overnight stay vs. our vet's quote of $350 PLUS $125 for blood work.  They took excellent care of him - that place is nicer than some people hospitals I have been to.

    ETA - We were reimbused for almost all of the cost for the neuter with the wellness rider we bought with his insurance.
     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from pinkkittie27. Show pinkkittie27's posts

    Re: Bringing home new puppy

    I also have pet insurance and it's a life-saver for those unexpected emergencies.

    Don't worry about getting all your questions into one visit, vets are used to new pet owners calling with questions. And they should be friendly about it. If they ever act annoyed about it, find a new vet.

    Ask what you should have at home for puppy first aid.
    Ask about general rules of thumb to discern a first-aid situation from a bring-the-dog-to-the-vet situation. like how you can tell if a limp is a fracture or sprain. Sprains are usually relieved with baby aspirin and limited activity for a day, no vet trip required.

    be aware that the most bumps and scrapes will happen during puppyhood (the first 2 years), and rest assured that 90% are no big deal. Don't be too worried if Cooper has worms or conjunctivitis when he comes home, those are really really common puppy issues and they clear up pretty quickly with the medicine the vet will give you. Once he's on monthly heartworm prevention, you won't have to deal with worms anymore since it prevents most parasites.

    another helpful tip: canned pumpkin (NOT the kind for pie) or cooked sweet potato is a great at-home remedy for upset puppy tummies.
     
  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Bringing home new puppy

    Our vet tech who answered the phone the day I gave Gracie canned pumpkin for her stomach told the vet I'd given her pumpkin PIE FILLING, and I got in trouble, lol!

    Oh, I have another one!  See what fruits and veggies Cooper likes and chop those up for treats instead of giving commerical treats.  And, if giving commercial treats, don't buy anything you've seen advertisted - they all have corn syrup as the number one ingredient...for the most part.  Gracie likes carrots, apples, raw butternut squash "waste" (skin and seed section that I throw out), and bananas.  And, of course, sugar free peanut butter like Pink suggested getting at TJs.  I also poached chicken liver for treats; it was her favorite and I reserved it for training important and difficult things like "Come," "Stay," and when I was teaching her the invisible fence border (must be 6 months old+ for that).
     
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