1. You have chosen to ignore posts from dog-lady. Show dog-lady's posts

    Foods to avoid feeding cats and dogs

    http://www.peteducation.com/article.cfm?c=1&aid=1029         http://www.peteducation.com/article.cfm?c=2+1659&aid=1030        Just a guide to refer to from time to time.  For example: I never knew grapes were toxic till recently.


     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from ALF72. Show ALF72's posts

    Re: Foods to avoid feeding cats and dogs

    Ah, because it was only a matter of time before someone had to rain on the parade of the cute thread about what human treats your pets love.

    Let's also not forget that pets lived happily on table scraps and the like for centuries before Petco existed.  Dog and cat food that was specially made and formulated for pets and that could be purchased in the grocery store is a relatively new invention and one that did not exist some 50 odd years ago.  Is it more beneficial for a pet to have a healthy diet? Of course, but a little tuna fish or raw hamburger is not going to kill them if they get it as an occasional treat.  Raw meat is not good for humans either on a regular basis, but I happily eat oysters, steak tartar and sushi on occasion and have not gotten sick yet.
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from yogafriend. Show yogafriend's posts

    Re: Foods to avoid feeding cats and dogs

    ALF: You're the bomb.  :D

    Regarding the food list of bad, bad food for cats, I believe those are common knowledge.  My family had pets all during my childhood, and in my adult life, I bought myself some cat care books, all of which cover dietary guidelines.  Funny, but in my book of "natural" cat care, many of the foods that the posters have mentioned in the fun thread are okay, if not good, by those guidelines.  That includes lettuce, and many other fruits and veggies.  

    I think the main thing in this life, be it for our pets or for humans: everything in moderation.  I mean it when I say I give a treat as big as my baby fingernail, and my kitty swoons.   No harm to him and it's fun makin' him happy.  :)
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from RedFishBlueFish. Show RedFishBlueFish's posts

    Re: Foods to avoid feeding cats and dogs

    Because people are incapable of finding this information themselves...


    Here's a suggestion for a new username: http://lmgtfy.com/

    That would be "letmegooglethatforyou" dot com.

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from Winter2011Bride. Show Winter2011Bride's posts

    Re: Foods to avoid feeding cats and dogs

    If you are going to provide links can you at least have them pop up in a new window. 

    ALF I wish there was a LIKE button.  :)
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from dog-lady. Show dog-lady's posts

    Re: Foods to avoid feeding cats and dogs

    .

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from Figment. Show Figment's posts

    Re: Foods to avoid feeding cats and dogs

    Like with people, a balanced diet is best for pets. I would be skeptical of any advice or studies conducted by any company that produces or promotes pet food products. Obviously their end game will be to sell more pet food. I have been feeding my pets table scraps all of my life and they have all lived to ripe old ages. Everything in moderation is best.
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Foods to avoid feeding cats and dogs

    We had a neighbor who fed their lab table scraps and she died of cancer; their vet attributed it to the "balanced" diet of tasty leftovers.  They don't feed their dogs table scraps anymore. 

    It might depend on the scraps - if you eat all lean chicked, brown rice, and vegetables, that's as good for dogs as it is for you.  

    However, if you eat the regular fat, sugar, and salt laden American diet and feed it to your dog, as well, whether they do OK with it might depend less on moderation and more on genetics.  The problem is, you don't know if your pet is predisposed to have life threatening/shortening problems with table food or not until it's too late.

    My great-grandmother lived on a working farm and ate "bad" food all day 'til she died at 101 - they sold cream and butter commercially.  You can only imagine her diet.  Other people might eat that way and have all manner of health issues that cut their lives short.  Smoking, too.  Some get lung cancer or emphysema and die young, some live long and relatively healthy lives.

    We're going the safer, imo, way with not feeding Gracie scraps.  She gets a balanced dog food, multi-vitamin, fish oil (people grade from Trader Joe's), and Springtime Inc. Longevity.  She better live a LONG time for all this!

    ETA:  Regarding the OP, it's true, grapes (and raisins) have a chemical that is toxic to dogs.  However, they really do need to chow down on them to get sick and die.  When Gracie was about 40 pounds she ingested about 10 raisins that had spilled on the floor before I could get them, and I panicked thinking I'd killed her.  When I reached the vet they couldn't contain a little good natured snicker at my horror; they said she'd literally need to eat a pound of them to do any damage.  I don't feed her raisins or grapes as treats, of course, but the idea that they are toxic scared to me death when she ate an infinitesimal fraction of a toxic amount.   

    By the way, I only shared about the raisins, not to be argumentative regarding the thread, but to keep anyone from going through the panic I did over a few accidentally consumed raisins.  Same with garlic.  A small amount is fine and actually promoted to be taken internally as a natural tick and flea deterrent.

    Tylenol, alcohol, even water, is toxic to humans in large amounts so try not to panic if your pets ingest toxic stuff before you find out how much it takes for the weight of your dog to cause a problem.  I'm not saying ignore it, but just try to relax.  I thought I might have killed Gracie again very recently when I couldn't find a 650 mg Tylenol tablet she might have eaten.  Again, I found out that it would take 7 times that to be toxic (for her 80 lbs), and, in some cases of a high fever the amount she could have swallowed is even prescribed to dogs.  Clearly, I didn't "almost kill her," as I feared I could have because I knew Tylenol is toxic to dogs.
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from miscricket. Show miscricket's posts

    Re: Foods to avoid feeding cats and dogs

    Kar, I agree. I give my cats fairly regular treats..but those treats consist of fish or chicken..sometime beef ( one cat will eat it..one won't). My son likes to make himself ham and egg sandwiches for breakfast and my younger cat goes completely wild over the ham...she comes running the minute she hears him take it out of the fridge...that is probably the most unhealthy thing she gets..
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from toytrumpet. Show toytrumpet's posts

    Re: Foods to avoid feeding cats and dogs

    In Response to Re: Foods to avoid feeding cats and dogs:
    [QUOTE]Kar, I agree. I give my cats fairly regular treats..but those treats consist of fish or chicken..sometime beef ( one cat will eat it..one won't). My son likes to make himself ham and egg sandwiches for breakfast and my younger cat goes completely wild over the ham...she comes running the minute she hears him take it out of the fridge...that is probably the most unhealthy thing she gets..
    Posted by miscricket[/QUOTE]

    It may be the saltiness of the ham that she goes bonkers over.  I know I mentioned this in another thread, but my cat loves green olives, all the cats I have had have, and I think it's the salt.

     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from kat yubs. Show kat yubs's posts

    Re: Foods to avoid feeding cats and dogs

    Speaking of bad foods for your pets, a friend of mine sent me an article about  commercial dog foods not to feed your dog.  I was shocked about what is in dog foods.  I feed my dog food I get from my vet because he tends to get bladder stones.  Many popular dog foods, wet and dry, are very bad for your dogs. What are your thoughts on commercial dog foods?  What do you feed your dogs?  One of the best foods for your dog was Newmans organic, kinda pricey.
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from kat yubs. Show kat yubs's posts

    Re: Foods to avoid feeding cats and dogs

    In Response to Re: Foods to avoid feeding cats and dogs:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: Foods to avoid feeding cats and dogs : I like Castor & Pollux Ultramix Adult Canine Formula  dry food,  the cheaper brands have more filler,  but that being said I have used them and never noticed adverse reactions... I don't want people to feel bad if that's all they can afford, I would usually add a little scrambled egg or some form of protein to it, after all they are  FDA approved.  If your pet has allergies or sensitivities  it is best to check with your vet.  Certain medical conditions will dictate that the animal needs to adhere to a specific diet.  I avoid canned foods but do use them once in a while just to add a tablespoon to the dry food for flavor.   What do you think is in hot dogs!      The other thing worth mentioning is that with the better quality dog foods  they don't need as much to be satisfied and you may save in vet bills down the road.     BTW:  How did the bully sticks work out? http://community.petco.com/discussions/Dog/fd03p00v01d1    another pet forum to check out. 
    Posted by dog-lady[/QUOTE]
     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from kat yubs. Show kat yubs's posts

    Re: Foods to avoid feeding cats and dogs

    The bully sticks worked out great.....thanks for asking.  He does only get one a week and I did find them in Petco. 

    Since my Shih Tzu gets bladder stones often (thank God for VPI) he needs to have the wet food more than the dry for the moisture.
     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from dog-lady. Show dog-lady's posts

    Re: Foods to avoid feeding cats and dogs

    In Response to Re: Foods to avoid feeding cats and dogs:
    [QUOTE]  Since my Shih Tzu gets bladder stones often (thank God for VPI) he needs to have the wet food more than the dry for the moisture.
    Posted by kat yubs[/QUOTE]

    You can check with your vet,  but I add about a cup of water to one of my dog's dry food because he has a tendency toward constipation plus it makes the food expand so he thinks he's getting more!
     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Foods to avoid feeding cats and dogs

    In Response to Re: Foods to avoid feeding cats and dogs:
    [QUOTE]The bully sticks worked out great.....thanks for asking.  He does only get one a week and I did find them in Petco.  Since my Shih Tzu gets bladder stones often (thank God for VPI) he needs to have the wet food more than the dry for the moisture.
    Posted by kat yubs[/QUOTE]

    Lukes, if Gracie had a tendancy to get bladder stones, I'd consider this Kidney Support supplement since it gets 5 of 5 "paws" with 28 reviews from owners whose pets have these problems.   I did give it to her briefly (one bottle) when she got a UTI, but I have no way of knowing if it did anything. Only Natural Pet Kidney Support  
     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from dog-lady. Show dog-lady's posts

    Re: Foods to avoid feeding cats and dogs

    The dog is under the care of a vet and I presume getting medication that is effective.

      Be careful with supplements,  they still have to be processed by the liver and kidneys.

      I wouldn't change or add anything to this dog's diet without the approval of your vet.    Just my opinion.

            BTW: natural does not = benign... heroin is natural,  made from the poppy flower.        http://pets.webmd.com/dogs/guide/dog-vitamins-and-supplements

     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Foods to avoid feeding cats and dogs

    What does consider mean if not that?
     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from dog-lady. Show dog-lady's posts

    Re: Foods to avoid feeding cats and dogs

      I like Castor & Pollux Ultramix Adult Canine Formula  dry food,  the cheaper brands have more filler,  but that being said I have used them and never noticed adverse reactions... I don't want people to feel bad if that's all they can afford.

    I would usually add a little scrambled egg or some form of protein to it, after all they are  FDA approved.

      If your pet has allergies or sensitivities  it is best to check with your vet.

      Certain medical conditions will dictate that the animal needs to adhere to a specific diet.

      I avoid canned foods but do use them once in a while  to add a tablespoon to the dry food for flavor.

       What do you think is in hot dogs!

         The other thing worth mentioning is that with the better quality dog foods  they don't need as much to be satisfied and you may save in vet bills down the road.    

     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Foods to avoid feeding cats and dogs

    In Response to Re: Foods to avoid feeding cats and dogs:
    [QUOTE]Speaking of bad foods for your pets, a friend of mine sent me an article about  commercial dog foods not to feed your dog.  I was shocked about what is in dog foods.  I feed my dog food I get from my vet because he tends to get bladder stones.  Many popular dog foods, wet and dry, are very bad for your dogs. What are your thoughts on commercial dog foods?  What do you feed your dogs?  One of the best foods for your dog was Newmans organic, kinda pricey.
    Posted by kat yubs[/QUOTE]

    Most commercial dog food has corn as the number one ingredient, even ones with big pictures of chicken and beef on the packaging.  I'm anti-corn unless it's all a dog owner can afford.

    Blue Buffalo is not the absolute best (meaning all meat, imo), but it's free of corn, wheat, and soy, major fillers with little nutritional value for a dog and that tend to cause allergies.  We feed our lab Blue Buffalo Fish and Oatmeal for Large Breeds.

    If we wanted to spend even more than $50/35 lb bag on dog food, my next choice would be Innova.  But, we don't.

     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from dog-lady. Show dog-lady's posts

    Re: Foods to avoid feeding cats and dogs

    Dog Foods, How to Switch


    Drs. Foster & Smith Educational Staff

    When feeding your pet a new food, introduce it slowly. If you feed too much too soon, your pet could suffer from stomach upset, vomiting, excess gas, constipation, or diarrhea.

    Intestinal Bacteria Play An Important Role

    Normal bacteria in the intestine help your dog or cat digest food. A sudden change in food can result in changes to the number and type of bacteria and their ability to help digest food. These changes can lead to intestinal upset. Therefore, your pet must be switched to a new food slowly.

    A Gradual Change is Best

    We recommend switching to a new food gradually over the course of 7-10 days. For example, make a mixture that contains 25% of the new food and 75% of the old food and feed that for three days. Then make it 50-50 for three more days, then 75% new food and 25% old food for three more days. If your pet seems comfortable with this progression, you can start feeding 100% new food.

    If at any time your dog or cat starts vomiting, has loose stools, or appears constipated, slow the rate at which you are switching the food. And as always, if problems continue to occur, consult your veterinarian.

     

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