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    Re: Great Dane Stomach Tacking

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  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Great Dane Stomach Tacking

    There are natural and very effective ways to avoid bloat, too.  We have a lab, and that breed is also prone (did you see Marley and Me?).

    Break the feedings up into 3 meals per day, do not allow exercise before or after eating (can't remember the exact time needed; ask your vet), and get a tall feeding station (like the one in the link) so the dog doesn't have to lean over to eat from the floor.  Also, no "people food," and I let our dry food soak up about a cup of water before she eats (her teeth are perfect, by the way - I clean them).

    By following those rules, you will drastically reduce the likelihood of bloat.  I can't say "eliminate" the risk because that's not entirely possible/truthful, but surgery isn't 100% effective, either.  Knowing these things, I'd personally not do the stomach surgery even on a GD.
     
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    Re: Great Dane Stomach Tacking

    When I was training Gracie and needed super duper "I'll do anything for those treats" treats, I dumped a small bucket of chicken liver in a pan and stewed it plain until it was cooked through and fed her pieces of that.  It was messy and smelled bad, but it got the job done.  And, it lasts about a week in the fridge (cooked).  And, she also likes Trader Joe's salt-free (I won't give her the salted version) natural peanut butter.  I stick my finger in and give her a few licks.  We're trying to keep her weight down so she doesn't get a lot.  She's 100% trained, now (she's 2), as well, so treats aren't as important for us at this point.

    Like I said, I can't guarantee she'll be bloat-free by following those guidelines (that would be so irresponsible of me!), but remember, your vet can't guarantee she'll be and stay well post-surgery, either.  I know without a shadow of a doubt what I would do, and all I can tell you in good conscience is that I would not do the stomach surgery for Dolly.  And, I have put Gracie through surgery (TPLO knee surgery) and would do it, again, if necessary, so I'm not anti-surgery, per se.  I just wouldn't do THAT surgery knowing that there are natural and effective ways to avoid bloat.

    Best to you and Dolly, and welcome to Pets. :)

    ~kar

    P.S.  I would not feed hotdogs (or bacon).  They are very salty and will cause Dolly to be very thirsty among other problems.
     
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    Re: Great Dane Stomach Tacking

    I have no experience in stomach tacking for dogs, but from my medical POV, I never advocate for "elective" surgery for something that may never happen when there's other non-surgical alternatives to consider such as those that Kar has suggested. This would somewhat equate to the general concept of me having a mastectomy to prevent breast cancer, should I happen to get it in the future. Tacking is another source of infection, which is the number 1 complication of any surgery and can be fatal, if not debilitating, if spread. There's also the slight risk of the tacks migrating through the skin, which I know my own vet has seen before.

    Having a dog myself, I want to do everything I can to keep her healthy and safe, so I know this is a tough decision for you. Good luck with whatever you choose to do.
     
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    Re: Great Dane Stomach Tacking

    Hope this isn't too much information,  but this article seems very informative.

     http://backalleysoapbox.wordpress.com/2010/09/01/bloat-gastric-torsion/ 

       Best of luck,  whatever you decide.

       If you have a good vet,  I would do whatever he or she recommends.

     
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    Re: Great Dane Stomach Tacking

    In Response to Re: Great Dane Stomach Tacking:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: Great Dane Stomach Tacking : Great idea -- chicken livers. Unfortunately, I live in Louisiana now and there are no Trader Joe's -- the travesty! But I think I can cook up something simliar. I've never known a dog who doesn't like treats. Dolly's...unusual in that way.
    Posted by Sally-[/QUOTE]

    I think you can get chicken livers and natural (no sugar, no salt) peanut butter at any grocery store, but I'm sorry you have no TJs!  My parents don't either, and they stock up on stuff when they visit from Pennsylvania.

    Gracie also went nuts for chicken hearts (stewed in their own juices like the liver).

    I believe you are leaning in the right direction just getting her spayed.  Bloat is scary, though, isn't it.  Dolly is a lucky girl to have you. :)  Please post a photo!

     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from kinga9. Show kinga9's posts

    Re: Great Dane Stomach Tacking

    http://www.zukes.com/

    We use these for Stella...they are small so they're great for training and she goes absolutely crazy for them She's not a big eater either, and is very picky with what she does actually eat, but she'll eat these.
     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Great Dane Stomach Tacking

    Many treats are laden with sugar (all forms) and salt.  Whatever you choose, check the labels.  They shouldn't contain wheat, soy, or corn, either.  

    Oh, yeah, high quality meat-based food is also a good way to prevent bloat.  Corn is a definite no-no but is in many "vet recommended" dog foods (like Science Diet, for instance), often as the first ingredient.
     
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    Re: Great Dane Stomach Tacking

    You could always put off getting her spayed.  There is no reason to do it when she's young other than convenience.  Some dog people suggest putting it off until the dog has reached full maturity at around 2 years of age.  There is no downside to putting it off except having to deal with her going into heat.
     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Great Dane Stomach Tacking

    Preventing the first heat cycle provides significant reduction in risk of mammary glandular cancer and is one reason we had Gracie spayed at six months.  
     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from pinkkittie27. Show pinkkittie27's posts

    Re: Great Dane Stomach Tacking

    I think that, if it were me, and there were no possible dangerous complications from the tacking, I would probably have it done. I've known quite a few dogs that died from bloat, and it's a really terrible ordeal for everyone involved.

    Even if you feed her small meals and don't give her table scraps, you never know when an accident might happen. Like if she's visiting someone and gobbles down a big bowl of cat food or manages to grab a roast off the counter. My dog Max has managed to eat himself sick on two separate occasions before I had time to notice. But if you don't plan on bringing Dolly to other people's houses or don't have many guests, you might not have to worry as much about these things.

    I would weigh the pros and cons, look at the statistics, look at your lifestyle, and do what you think is best.
     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Great Dane Stomach Tacking

    Dr. Glickman's also recommended free feeding to prevent bloat.  Does he know anything about Labrador Retrievers (who are also prone to bloat)?  Free feeding a Lab would be disastrous with respect to weight and related health problems.

    The results of his study, generally speaking, has been refuted for his potentially flawed causal analysis.

     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from spoogedog. Show spoogedog's posts

    Re: Great Dane Stomach Tacking

    All of my dogs are/were free fed, these include a yellow lab, beagle, pitbull, and now a border collie, retriever, and another beagle. For treats I get duck tenders (see below), the dogs love them and you could break them into smaller pieces for training purposes.

    Canyon Creek Ranch Duck Tenders are an easy way to add variety to your dog's daily diet and a great alternative for dogs with sensitive digestive systems. Like the Chicken Jerky Tenders, Canyon Creek Ranch Duck Tenders are 97% fat free and slow-cooked to seal in the natural flavors.

    Ingredients: Duck breast, vegetable glycerin, natural flavor.

     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from pinkkittie27. Show pinkkittie27's posts

    Re: Great Dane Stomach Tacking

    they also make food bowls that prevent fast eating:


    I've seen ones at Petco, too. They also make those kibble balls which only dole out a few bits at a time.
     
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