Housebreaking Question

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from whatawagSBNy. Show whatawagSBNy's posts

    Re: Housebreaking Question

         KEK - you might want to try Iams Senior (rather than other brands like the Purina for older dogs.)  The Iams is enough lower in proteins etc to be good for older bladders and kidneys, and your dog's  concentration of minerals and by-products in blood then urine will change her over to where she has a less urgent need to go.  It takes about a week to ten days but may make a noticeable change.  If she is toothless you can moisten it with hot water, wait 5 min to absorb enough to be softer.  It also has lower residue (less waste produced) due to less corn meal and such.  Thing about an unknown history, she may have had lots of people food when younger, may even be borderline diabetic or having kidney problems, so while treating a symptom to reduce urinary frequency by diet (not meds) you can prevent bladder and kidney stones  and other problems of aged female dogs.
         It is always great when someone takes in an old soul.
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Housebreaking Question

    In Response to Re: Housebreaking Question:
    [QUOTE]they like being told what to do. Dogs that get to do whatever they want are usually very anxious and confused. No structure weirds them out. In Response to Re: Housebreaking Question :
    Posted by pinkkittie27[/QUOTE]

    You must be right - everyone comments on how calm, peaceful, and happy she seems to be all the time, everywhere we go.  They just can't believe she's so young. And, here I am stressing myself out because I hate to discipline her (but it never stops me).  Thanks for the encouragement, pinkie!

    Speaking of discipline and housebreaking, she's started doing something new.  Now, she acts up when she has to go out.  Grabs a shoe and runs around or something.  Thankfully, I guessed what the issue was before an accident simply because I had my eye on the clock and the last time she ate.  Yup, she went big time as soon as she got out there.  What's up with that?  When is she gonna just go to the door and whine like normal dogs???

    whata, good advice about the food. 
     
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    Re: Housebreaking Question

    they like being told what to do. Dogs that get to do whatever they want are usually very anxious and confused. No structure weirds them out.

    In Response to Re: Housebreaking Question:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: Housebreaking Question : I'm the biggest meanie in her life, but thankfully she doesn't seem to see it that way.
    Posted by kargiver[/QUOTE]
     
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    Re: Housebreaking Question

    In Response to Re: Housebreaking Question:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: Housebreaking Question : Easier said than done with the winter coming up.  I've got 2 dogs - same breed, age, gender.  Both were litter box trained by the breeder.  One is fully house broken while the other doesn't like to go outside when it's raining.  Different dogs, different personalites.
    Posted by DirtyWaterLover[/QUOTE]

    They are as different as people are!  I really didn't know they had SO MUCH personality.  Sounds nuts, I'm sure, but I only ever really knew one dog in my life before we got our puppy.

    Our pup hates the rain, too.  She even peeed in the house one time because she looked outside and we were having the heaviest rain we had in July.  Monsoon.  Was I ticked?  Yeah, but I have to admit, smart dog.  Happily, she hasn't done it since.  I was worried there for awhile after that stunt.
     
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    Re: Housebreaking Question

    In Response to Re: Housebreaking Question:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Housebreaking Question : My fiance and I adopted a 3 month old Chi/terrier puppy a month or so ago and had the same dilemma.  Our puppy went 100% on his puppy pads and we tried to move him outside completely and still had the pads down in case of an inside accident.  He had a tough time with this and we believe it confused him.  He has the occasional accident inside but he is picking up on going outside.  My advice is to not use any indoor pads or paper and strictly train to go outside.  Yes, there will be accidents but the pup will catch on.  Also, praise like you've never praised before when they go outside in their potty place.....it helps if you have treats handy too for immediately after a successful potty outside.
    Posted by mandokid[/QUOTE]

    Easier said than done with the winter coming up.  I've got 2 dogs - same breed, age, gender.  Both were litter box trained by the breeder.  One is fully house broken while the other doesn't like to go outside when it's raining.  Different dogs, different personalites.
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from pinkkittie27. Show pinkkittie27's posts

    Re: Housebreaking Question

    pee sticks do work, but if you're in the city there's enough places that other dogs have peed that they don't need one.

    But if you've got your own yard, i'd recommend the pee stick. They also have ones that look like fire hydrants.

    All in all, if you have a small dog, having them pad or litter-box trained has it's advantages. If you're going out late or something, they have a place to relieve themselves and you don't have to scramble trying to find someone to walk them.

    Some pads also are made to smell like grass, so that when your dog's outside and on the grass he'll instinctivly want to go.
    As with any housebreaking, if you're trying to switch away from pads you'll just need to walk the dog more often until he "gets it". And if he starts to go in the house, bring him right outside.

    In Response to Re: Housebreaking Question:
    [QUOTE]It makes sense to me that it would be super confusing for any dog to be taught to peee inside on papers if you want the dog to peee outside on the grass. I saw a "peee stick" that you can hammer into the ground at the spot you want the dog to go.  It's treated with chemicals that I suppose are on the pads.  Maybe that would help?
    Posted by kargiver[/QUOTE]
     
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    Re: Housebreaking Question

    Our trainer just recommended Iams last night for the same reasons.  We're going to try it, too.  Of course, I just bought a new 32.5 lb bag of Purina Puppy Chow.  Maybe they'll take it back unopened.

    KEK, make sure you ask for a sample to see if your dog will eat it.  Our puppy absolutely refused her Science Diet to the point where she was WAY underweight.  She just wouldn't eat it.  So much for "if she's hungry enough..."  Our trainer told us that many places will give you a sample.

    Of course, it will be new and not preferred (well, I guess she could like it better, I don't know), but at least you will be able to see if your dog runs as fast as possible away from the food before you buy a ton.
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from KEK. Show KEK's posts

    Re: Housebreaking Question

    Sorry for not replying but I just saw your post.  I have been giving her Newman's Own Organic, primarily because the kibble is very small.  She has been doing well on it but she is a bit of a mooch.  Always close by when people food is available.  I am limiting her protein so all she gets is fruit/vegetables. 
    Next time I need to buy food I will try Iams.  Thanks for the advise.

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from pinkkittie27. Show pinkkittie27's posts

    Re: Housebreaking Question

    LOL that's Max to a T!
    If I'm doing something and not sticking to the schedule of feeding or walking, he starts pitching a fit. He stares at me, and kind of stomps on the floor impatiently, and he does the growly bark thing a very subtle "rrrrrrrrrruff!"
    I just give him a stern look and say "No, you're pitchin' a fit!" then when he settles down I take him out or feed him.

    In Response to Re: Housebreaking Question:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: Housebreaking Question : You must be right - everyone comments on how calm, peaceful, and happy she seems to be all the time, everywhere we go.  They just can't believe she's so young. And, here I am stressing myself out because I hate to discipline her (but it never stops me).  Thanks for the encouragement, pinkie! Speaking of discipline and housebreaking, she's started doing something new.  Now, she acts up when she has to go out.  Grabs a shoe and runs around or something.  Thankfully, I guessed what the issue was before an accident simply because I had my eye on the clock and the last time she ate.  Yup, she went big time as soon as she got out there.  What's up with that?  When is she gonna just go to the door and whine like normal dogs??? whata, good advice about the food. 
    Posted by kargiver[/QUOTE]
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from DirtyWaterLover. Show DirtyWaterLover's posts

    Re: Housebreaking Question

    In Response to Re: Housebreaking Question:
    [QUOTE]Our trainer just recommended Iams last night for the same reasons.  We're going to try it, too.  Of course, I just bought a new 32.5 lb bag of Purina Puppy Chow.  Maybe they'll take it back unopened. KEK, make sure you ask for a sample to see if your dog will eat it.  Our puppy absolutely refused her Science Diet to the point where she was WAY underweight.  She just wouldn't eat it.  So much for "if she's hungry enough..."  Our trainer told us that many places will give you a sample. Of course, it will be new and not preferred (well, I guess she could like it better, I don't know), but at least you will be able to see if your dog runs as fast as possible away from the food before you buy a ton.
    Posted by kargiver[/QUOTE]

    IAMS, Purina, Science Diet aren't considered to be very good dog foods.  There are a lot of really, really good, high quality foods.  Check the ingredients.  I try to stay away from dog food that contain corn or wheat products.  If you live/work in Boston or Waltham, check out Skipton's.  They've got the best selection of good high quality dog foods that I know of.  Petco has even upgraded their selection of pet foods.
     
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    Re: Housebreaking Question

        When changing over a dog's food, it is usually recommended that you start with a small bag of the new, and mix with some of the old food to start with, for at least a week transition, so as not to cause digestive upset.

         Most vets, humane societies and labs doing medical dietary experiments do recommend Iams.  Why would you not?  Any reason besides the advertising of another brand?
    Corn  (and very small quantities of carrots)  is among the most recommended vegetables for dog digestion.

          I know Skipton's Kennels feature Natura Brands.  Innova is high in grains, and the percentage of rice and brown rice (and no corn)  is very poorly tolerated by some breeds of Dogs.  A number of our dogs cannot have any  rice formula. Almost all of their food is turkey and Chicken, with NO  RED Meat.  They are   generally given thumbs down for any large muscled or working breed, for that reason.   Also, consumer testing has shown that among the 5% of non-organic  ingredients is poultry that has been chicken farmed with anti-biotics in the feed, even though many of their suppliers are organic.  That means you know the average of the food supply is mostly organic, but the product of any 1 plant at any time could be 30% or so NOT, which makes it no different from lots of foods.
        Their Natura Evo Brands  Boast that they have the highest Protein Content of any food.  Angel Memorial  and the Vets in Windham  who removed a Lava soap sized Kidney stone from a dog we adopted (fed Evo exclusively by breeder, a cull due to eye injury but a healthy seeming 2 year old)    both say,  far too high a protein content for 90 % of Big Dogs, causes kidney damage.
    The boast of being 90 or 95% organic is not he only consideration in a dog food.  Blowing their kidneys at an early age from too much protein is a serious issue.  Large dogs who are very active go through a much greater amount of food for their body weight than small pet breeds,  and this is where the too high protein formulas are a problem.  All Evo studies (and some other brands)  and those for Purina Hi-Pro are for measured amounts a very sedentary dog would eat,  but serious trouble for a highly active dog who consumes lots more food.
         There are several good dog food lines.  Our dogs have done well with Iams.  Mostly  we have not chosen Lamb and rice formulas because of the Rice.
         Blue Seal also carries some excellent lines.

        The folks at Skiptons may be nice, but when I saw them with the dogs of an old roommate who still lives in Waverly Sq.  Belmont (nearby) they were great about exercising dogs, and maintaining training, but had zip real knowledge of general dog breeding  or scientific/ medical knowledge of  nutrition beyond Pop science.
     
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    In Response to Re: Housebreaking Question:
    [QUOTE]    When changing over a dog's food, it is usually recommended that you start with a small bag of the new, and mix with some of the old food to start with, for at least a week transition, so as not to cause digestive upset.      Most vets, humane societies and labs doing medical dietary experiments do recommend Iams.  Why would you not?  Any reason besides the advertising of another brand? Corn  (and very small quantities of carrots)  is among the most recommended vegetables for dog digestion.       I know Skipton's Kennels feature Natura Brands.  Innova is high in grains, and the percentage of rice and brown rice (and no corn)  is very poorly tolerated by some breeds of Dogs.  A number of our dogs cannot have any  rice formula. Almost all of their food is turkey and Chicken, with NO  RED Meat.  They are   generally given thumbs down for any large muscled or working breed, for that reason.   Also, consumer testing has shown that among the 5% of non-organic  ingredients is poultry that has been chicken farmed with anti-biotics in the feed, even though many of their suppliers are organic.  That means you know the average of the food supply is mostly organic, but the product of any 1 plant at any time could be 30% or so NOT, which makes it no different from lots of foods.     Their Natura Evo Brands  Boast that they have the highest Protein Content of any food.  Angel Memorial  and the Vets in Windham  who removed a Lava soap sized Kidney stone from a dog we adopted (fed Evo exclusively by breeder, a cull due to eye injury but a healthy seeming 2 year old)    both say,  far too high a protein content for 90 % of Big Dogs, causes kidney damage. The boast of being 90 or 95% organic is not he only consideration in a dog food.  Blowing their kidneys at an early age from too much protein is a serious issue.  Large dogs who are very active go through a much greater amount of food for their body weight than small pet breeds,  and this is where the too high protein formulas are a problem.  All Evo studies (and some other brands)  and those for Purina Hi-Pro are for measured amounts a very sedentary dog would eat,  but serious trouble for a highly active dog who consumes lots more food.      There are several good dog food lines.  Our dogs have done well with Iams.  Mostly  we have not chosen Lamb and rice formulas because of the Rice.      Blue Seal also carries some excellent lines.     The folks at Skiptons may be nice, but when I saw them with the dogs of an old roommate who still lives in Waverly Sq.  Belmont (nearby) they were great about exercising dogs, and maintaining training, but had zip real knowledge of general dog breeding  or scientific/ medical knowledge of  nutrition beyond Pop science.
    Posted by whatawagSBNy[/QUOTE]

    Dogs can't digest Corn.  Corn is added to increase the protien content of food.  The problem is, dogs can't process the protien from corn.  Wheat products are added for filler. 

    Here are the first 4 ingredients of IAMS:Chicken, Corn Meal, Ground Whole Grain Sorghum, Chicken By-Product Meal. 

    I tried to find the ingredients for Purina one, but they aren't list ed on their website by % content - just alphabetical.  However corn is in their products.  And what are they trying to hide by not list the ingredients on their web site as they are required to list them on the packages.

    The ingredients for EVO:  Beef, Lamb Meal, Potatoes, Egg, Sunflower oil, Buffalo, venison, Lamb, Beef Cartilege, apples, herring oil.

    Red meat is hard to find in good quality dog food because good quality red meat is hard to find.  Good high quality chicken is easier to find.

    A dog digestion system is much shorter than a human's.  Food doesn't stay in their systems very long.  Food that is hard to digest stresses their systems and causes damage.  The enzynes in meat aid in it's breakdown.  Raw meat is the easiest food to digest for a dog because it has all of it's enzymes.  As meat is cooked, the enzymes get killed.  The higher the temperature for cooking the meat, the fewer enzymes left and the harder it is to digest by a dog.

    Most commercial dog foods with beef use the meat that is not fit for human consumption.  It's from diseased and dying animals.  To kill any possible disease in the meat, it has to be cooked to a very high temperatue - think very well done.  This not only kills the disease in the meat, it kills all of the enzymes in the meat.

    And as far as vets and labs recommending Iams... the studies performed by the labs are paid for by..... large pet food companies like Iams.  As for vets, vets sell Science Diet.  They sell it because they make a lot of money on it.  Truth is, science diet is terrible.

    Here are the first several ingredients of Science Diet W/D formula (for diabetic dogs)..Ground Whole Grain Corn, Powdered Cellulose 17.1% (source of fiber), Chicken by-product Meal, Chicken Liver Flavor, Soybean Mill Run, Corn Gluten Meal, Soybean Oil, Dried Beet Pulp, Soybean Meal

    17.1% Powdered Cellulose.  Do you know what powdered cellulose is?  A few years ago you would have found Powdered Cellulose on the list of ingredients.  instead, they listed "Peanut Shells".  They didn't replace peanut shells with powdered cellulose, they just changed what they called it. 

    And why to they add peanut shells to thier perscription dog food for diabetic dogs?  Because diabetics need fiber so they add peanut shells to increase the fiber content.  Now, I don't know about you, but if i saw my dog reach down and pick up a peanut shell I would remove it from their mouth.  But Vets are prescribing it for sick dogs.

    Instead of adding peanut shells to dog food, why don't they add pumpkin to the food?  Pumpkin has the highest content of fiber of any veggie and is something that is actualluy good for your dog.

    The point being, why would I listen someone that wants to charge me a lot of money for peanut shells to feed my dog about dog nutrition?

    If you want to learn more about canine nutrition, I recommend the book, "Dogs, Diet, and Disease.  Read this book and you'll never feed a dog commercial dog food again.
     
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    Re: Housebreaking Question

    Our pup hated the food we were giving her so much that she was actually starving herself (we didn't know how underweight she was until we went to the vet for something else).  If we followed the recommended guidance of mixing new food in, she wouldn't take a single bite of the new food.  Once it touched the old food it was damaged goods.

    I mention it just in case anyone else is in the same boat.  Whata, as usual with pet advice, is 100% correct - I'm not in the least bit contradicting or pooh-poohing her advice (get it? Pooh? HA!).  Our puppy did have digestive upset.  But, it was livable - she only had soft stools for about 2 days (not "emergency" diarrhea or pain that I could perceive).  So, if you can't follow the recommendation it will be OK...at least it was for her.  I was very nervous about it, knowing what we should do, but she was so thin and refused to eat, I had to just give her what she'd eat.
     
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    Re: Housebreaking Question

    Thanks, DWL!  It shouldn't be this hard to feed a puppy...  Sigh.
     
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    In Response to Re: Housebreaking Question:
    [QUOTE]the corn is digestable, but just like high fructose corn syrup, it has too many calories, too much glucose and not enough nutritional value for it to be a primary ingradient. It's empty calories and sugar. Bran, barley and brown rice are far more appropriate to feed a dog than corn meal. They have whole grains, full of fatty acids that are good for the skin coat and heart, tons of nutritional value. Corn doesn't have any of that. Cornmeal leads to health problems and obesity. as far as the dog liking it, the hollistic and natural foods are far more palatable. even the pickiest dogs love Solid Gold and Blue Buffalo. But I've never seen a lab turn down any food. Labs are extremely prone to weight gain and bloat because of that. Even more reason to keep corn out of their diet.
    Posted by pinkkittie27[/QUOTE]

    Corn Gluten, rather than whole corn, is commonly found in pet food.  Corn Gluten is the by-product of removing the sugars from corn (used to create corn syrup).  They add the gluten because it increases the protein content of the food.  The problem is, the dog cannot break down the protein from corn.  I'm not sure if the corn products by themselves contribute to obesity in dogs because dog food that contains corn products are usually bad in other ways.

    The bottom line that is that feeding your dog a good quality dog food is the best way to go.  Corn and wheat can be used to identify pet foods that are poor in quality.

    Probably the best way to go is to find a couple of different brands of dog food, and mix them.  A pet is best served by a diet that has a variety of ingredients.  Red Meat has things in it that chicken or fish do not and vice versa. 

    I primarily feed my dogs raw food from 2 different producers.  One is beef the other is duck.  I also use dry food as training treats which accounts for about 1/2 of my dogs' diet.  I combine dry dog food from several different brands (Innova, Wellness, Evo, as many others) and from several different main ingredients: Red meat, chicken, fish, lamb, etc. 

    For additional fiber, I add a dollop of canned pumpkin to their raw food.  I add in a little olive oil for their coats and their evening meal gets a teaspoon of the supplement, "Missing Link".

    For puppies, a dollop of cottage cheese increases the calcium content of their food.
     
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    Re: Housebreaking Question

    We have a nutty lab, I guess, for having starved herself when she hated her food.  I had heard that labs eat tons of anything...I was stunned when she refused to eat! 

    Although, I think now we have a new problem.  She's getting so much training a day that she's not that hungry for regular food of any sort.  Her bones will be strong - we use a lot of cheese.  But, obviously, that's not remotely complete nutrition and is far too salty.

    Any suggestions for healthy training treats that would complement her regular dog food from a nutritional standpoint? 
     
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    Re: Housebreaking Question

         Any dog trainer will tell you, nothing so great as dried liver bits,  and oh how wonderful your coat pockets smell forever when you carry packets for training. A combination of eau de vomit and 5 day old fish!

         Since we always have finely shredded fresh Parmesian or provolone in the house, I toss Rice or Wheat Chex  and cheerios on a cookie sheet,  sprinkle a fine small amount over the top, either 1 min  or til cheese has melted and slightly toasted under the broiler or nuke. (I think the drying heat of under the broiler helps them stay toasty crunch and not spoil, but in a hurry, nuke.)   In a pinch, a 1oz slice of cheese cut in to small pieces- like 64 (8 x 8) to 100 - one per  small  oyster cracker, chex or cheerios.
        Parm, and non-oily cereals  keep a while with no mold, so a small container done 1 time a week is great.  Not so filling as straight cheese!  1 oz cereal and .5 oz cheese will do for days.
         I keep a  7 day pill reminder  in the XL or XXL sixe in a pocket - each section will hold chex or smaller treats.  No smell escapes!
     
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    Re: Housebreaking Question

    Thanks!  I'll see what our farm co-op sells.  I'm out here in the boonies, but they seem to have endless bags of dog food.  They must sell at least one of these.
     
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    Re: Housebreaking Question

    Petco carries them all too, so you can always order online. It's probably cheaper to buy the really really big bag for you, since your pup is probably getting so big so fast! :)

    Look for a food that has glucosamine and anitoxidants in it, for a large breed dog that helps stave off joint problems, cancer and heart disease. Or you can always supplement with Omega-3 fatty acids for those too. Dr. Fosters & Smith has the best and the cheapest supplements.

    In Response to Re: Housebreaking Question:
    [QUOTE]Thanks!  I'll see what our farm co-op sells.  I'm out here in the boonies, but they seem to have endless bags of dog food.  They must sell at least one of these.
    Posted by kargiver[/QUOTE]
     
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    Re: Housebreaking Question

    What should we feed our puppy then?  We thought we were doing the right thing with the Puppy Chow!
     
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    Re: Housebreaking Question

    kargiver-  you are right. I will amend what I said.  When changing feeds by the owner's choice, mixing old and new may save GI upset and ease transition of foods over a week's time.
         But if a dog rejects or eats little of their regular food, or has a medical change- you swap over. And be prepared for gas, urgency, or a few days constipation.
         I did not realize your dog ate the old food minimally.  Why make him reject new by association?
        
         Lots of Aggie stores carry Blue Seal feeds and pet foods, and their Active Dog feed will do for older than 3 month pups like labs, where you want some extra carbs for energy, and a higher quality combination of protein,   not an excessive quantity more  that harms kidneys and bladder.  They also have a pup and regular adult dog formulas.  But I cannot imagine a lab pup not fitting the higher carb,  but not higher fat, protein or residue, desired  profile. 
         Lots of people give larger working and active dogs mostly Active Formula  in active season,  regular in winter when indoors and cooped up (except sled dogs who get active in winter!)
         Iams mini chunk  Pro - Active health, mixed with pup food or not, I still recommend.  1/3 of the meat is not from poultry. 
        And corn , when ground, is  highly digestable by dogs as well as people-  a CUP is 123 g useable carb, 16 g protein, 8 g fat and only 12g fiber  ,  not a useless ingredient of indigestable fiber.  The carbs in grain sorghum molasses and the quality of soybean protein mixed with lamb or beef or pork  is better  and less concentrated than all poultry. [ DWL's  and Natura's info does not match with any of our Vet, feed research, Dept. Agriculture or other non-company sponsored published data.]

        I never had a dog that would eat Hills more than in small amounts, then scrounge.  And I know our Northern Arctic/sub-arctic dogs probably do not handle rice well because it has not been in their diet any time in 5000 years.  Our springers, parents old lab  have some plain rice mixed in with their meal when we give them actual meat (not pet food) and yours may do fine with rice formula, or be a corn, barley oatmeal fan.

    Let pup try a couple of kinds.  He has to like it, or what point?

         I meant to say before- avoid ones like Kibbles and Bits- high flavorings and salt-  for a very active dog eating a lot,  they can  pig it down because of the high flavoring, and  get ill.  Like Eukanuba which is too high fat and salt for any but a dog getting small measured portions, just wrong for young lab.
     
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    Re: Housebreaking Question

    Oh, love the broiled cheese/rice idea, whata.  And CT - yeah, I think you're right about the pocket effect! ;)

    I'll make some cheesy cereal treats today.  It's only 61 degrees in here so that will kill two birds with one stone.
     
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    Re: Housebreaking Question

    the corn is digestable, but just like high fructose corn syrup, it has too many calories, too much glucose and not enough nutritional value for it to be a primary ingradient. It's empty calories and sugar.
    Bran, barley and brown rice are far more appropriate to feed a dog than corn meal. They have whole grains, full of fatty acids that are good for the skin coat and heart, tons of nutritional value. Corn doesn't have any of that. Cornmeal leads to health problems and obesity.

    as far as the dog liking it, the hollistic and natural foods are far more palatable. even the pickiest dogs love Solid Gold and Blue Buffalo. But I've never seen a lab turn down any food. Labs are extremely prone to weight gain and bloat because of that. Even more reason to keep corn out of their diet.
     
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    Re: Housebreaking Question

    As a puppy Max got Eukanuba. It made him very fat, and my vet told me to switch. I went to Polka Dog and they recommended Evo by Innova because of it was high protein.
    I fed Max Evo by Innova: Red Meat kibble for 3 years. He dropped the excess weight in just a couple of weeks. He's very healthy, the only issue we've ever had to make an extra trip to the vet for was an ear infection.
    Max cannot have any food with chicken in it because he's allergic. It makes him itchy, and he'll lick his paws incessantly.
    I recently switched him to Just A Wee Bit by Solid Gold because it's a little cheaper, but still high quality. It's a hollistic food, and he's doing quite well on it.
    Max also suffers from seasonal allergies, they can lead to ear infections, skin infections and the like. So I give im Omega-3 fish oil supplements, and they work wonders. His coat is super shiny, and no itchy-ness problems, even int he dry dry Boston winters.

    Iams and the like do have way too much grain in them. That makes dogs fat, and because of the high glucose levels in the food, can make them diabetic later in life.

    Blue Buffalo, Solid Gold, California Naturals, Avoderm, Innova, Spot's Stew are all very good natural or hollistic brands.
     
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    Re: Housebreaking Question

    Kargiver, you can also use pieces of her hard food for training.  Honestly, anything that comes out of your pocket tastes special for most dogs! So for the harder things to do (stay/wait, leave it, come) you may want to use cheese or liver pieces, but for easier things for her, use her kibble. 
     

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