1. You have chosen to ignore posts from GoneToTheDogs39. Show GoneToTheDogs39's posts

    Indoor, sedentary cats need less food

     

    By John de Jong / Ask the Vet | Sunday, October 21, 2012 | http://www.bostonherald.com | Lifestyle

    Dear Dr. John,

    We recently adopted a cat from a local shelter and we are very pleased with how well he has adapted to our home and our other cat. We have had several cats over the years and never have we had one that is so mellow and easy to cuddle with. The reason for writing is because this cat has had an enormous appetite since arriving at our home. We saw these rice grain-looking things around his backside and were told that he had tapeworm so we had him treated. Could tapeworm really cause that huge of an appetite? On another note, we give our cats both canned and dry food. To look at the recommended amount of food that a cat should have is crazy. The brand we use states that each cat should have one small can per every 2 1/2 pounds of body weight twice daily. Does that sound right? That would mean I would feed this cat 3 cans twice a day! What is the right amount of food to give a cat? Thanks. K.F.

    Dear K.F.,

    Tapeworm can cause a ravenous appetite, as can several other intestinal parasites since the parasites are competing for the energy that the food supplies to the pet. As for the right amount of food to feed a cat, I would point out several things. This also applies to dogs. Pet food companies are in the business of selling food. The more they sell the more profitable they are. However, I also believe that the large majority of pet food producers want to do what is right for the animals for which they produce foods. The quantity of food recommended for consumption that is often listed on cans or bags would potentially be appropriate for an outdoor animal that has a lot of exercise and burns off lots of calories. Most cats are indoor pets with sedentary lifestyles, and typically 1/4 cup of food given twice a day should suffice. You can always feed more as needed but once an animal is overweight, getting the pounds off can be tough, to say nothing of potential secondary problems such as heart disease and diabetes. Enjoy the new cat, and now that he has been treated for the tapeworm, feed the amount I suggest and take it from there.

    Article URL: http://www.bostonherald.com/entertainment/lifestyle/view.bg?articleid=1061169174

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from miscricket. Show miscricket's posts

    Re: Indoor, sedentary cats need less food

    In response to Robin39's comment:
    [QUOTE]

     

    By John de Jong / Ask the Vet | Sunday, October 21, 2012 | http://www.bostonherald.com | Lifestyle

    Dear Dr. John,

    We recently adopted a cat from a local shelter and we are very pleased with how well he has adapted to our home and our other cat. We have had several cats over the years and never have we had one that is so mellow and easy to cuddle with. The reason for writing is because this cat has had an enormous appetite since arriving at our home. We saw these rice grain-looking things around his backside and were told that he had tapeworm so we had him treated. Could tapeworm really cause that huge of an appetite? On another note, we give our cats both canned and dry food. To look at the recommended amount of food that a cat should have is crazy. The brand we use states that each cat should have one small can per every 2 1⁄2 pounds of body weight twice daily. Does that sound right? That would mean I would feed this cat 3 cans twice a day! What is the right amount of food to give a cat? Thanks.— K.F.

    Dear K.F.,

    Tapeworm can cause a ravenous appetite, as can several other intestinal parasites since the parasites are competing for the energy that the food supplies to the pet. As for the right amount of food to feed a cat, I would point out several things. This also applies to dogs. Pet food companies are in the business of selling food. The more they sell the more profitable they are. However, I also believe that the large majority of pet food producers want to do what is right for the animals for which they produce foods. The quantity of food recommended for consumption that is often listed on cans or bags would potentially be appropriate for an outdoor animal that has a lot of exercise and burns off lots of calories. Most cats are indoor pets with sedentary lifestyles, and typically D cup of food given twice a day should suffice. You can always feed more as needed but once an animal is overweight, getting the pounds off can be tough, to say nothing of potential secondary problems such as heart disease and diabetes. Enjoy the new cat, and now that he has been treated for the tapeworm, feed the amount I suggest and take it from there.

    Article URL: http://www.bostonherald.com/entertainment/lifestyle/view.bg?articleid=1061169174

    [/QUOTE]


    What is a D cup of food..? I have never heard this term used.

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from GoneToTheDogs39. Show GoneToTheDogs39's posts

    Re: Indoor, sedentary cats need less food

    Obviously a typo   :)   

    PS: It is best to use a quality food...  

    http://community.petco.com/discussions/Cat_Discussion_Forum/fd03p00v02d1?q=hills+science&nav=search

        Blue Buffalo Wilderness is the top of their line as far as low carbs and high protein, but there are other superior foods, like Evo-Innova, Young Again, Wellness Core, and Nature's Variety Instinct.

     

     

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from miscricket. Show miscricket's posts

    Re: Indoor, sedentary cats need less food

    So..that being said..what amount do you think he is suggesting? At first I thought he was suggesting a cup..twice a day. That would be an awful lot for a cat.

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from miscricket. Show miscricket's posts

    Re: Indoor, sedentary cats need less food

    duplicate

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from GoneToTheDogs39. Show GoneToTheDogs39's posts

    Re: Indoor, sedentary cats need less food

    I'm not sure, I left a message about the error,  if I had to guess 1/3 cup dry twice a day or a 3oz can of wet food twice a day,  does that sound right? 

    I will update if I get clarification.

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from miscricket. Show miscricket's posts

    Re: Indoor, sedentary cats need less food

    In response to Robin39's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    I'm not sure, I left a message about the error,  if I had to guess 1/3 cup dry twice a day or a 3oz can of wet food twice a day,  does that sound right? 

    I will update if I get clarification.

    [/QUOTE]


    Yes...1/3 cup twice a day is what I give and what my vet recommends.

     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from Winter2011Bride. Show Winter2011Bride's posts

    Re: Indoor, sedentary cats need less food

    Different vets give different amounts. My vet suggested 3/4 cup of food a day. He gets it in two servings.

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from GoneToTheDogs39. Show GoneToTheDogs39's posts

    Re: Indoor, sedentary cats need less food

     Update:  Just spoke to someone at The Heraldcorrection made: 

    "Most cats are indoor pets with sedentary lifestyles, and typically 1/4 cup of food given twice a day should suffice. You can always feed more as needed but once an animal is overweight, getting the pounds off can be tough, to say nothing of potential secondary problems such as heart disease and diabetes."   (excerpt from article)

    PS: That will be one lean, mean cat!

     
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