1. You have chosen to ignore posts from AGOODDOG. Show AGOODDOG's posts

    Is Your Dog Biddable or Non-Biddable?

    Knowing if your dog is biddable or non-biddable makes a huge difference on how willing they are to be trained, and what methods you may need to use, to get through to them.  A biddable dog is one that is willing, even eager to please their owner.  Non-biddable dog is one that believes the older they get, the dumber we get.  Which one is your dog?
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from Maldenlady. Show Maldenlady's posts

    Re: Is Your Dog Biddable or Non-Biddable?

    Golden Retrievers.  If someone broke into the house, they'd be in grave danger of being licked relentlessly. 

    *So* eager to please.  Very trainable.  Not the sharpest knives in the drawer, but great sould and spirits.  They are guided by their nose, so I'd say that's about the only competition you're going to have for his/her attention!
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Is Your Dog Biddable or Non-Biddable?

    Our lab is headstrong but as eager to please (and sad and apologetic when she doesn't) as every other lab.
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from Maldenlady. Show Maldenlady's posts

    Re: Is Your Dog Biddable or Non-Biddable?

    Hey, kar!

    Deeply apologetic when she doesn't please?!?  I love it!  Awww, give Gracie a hug for me!

    I've noticed an interesting thing with the puppy, Cora (7-month, female) Golden Retriever..we are trying to work on "come", and at first she has absolutely no idea what we're talking about.  Then her Dad, Eli (6-year old male) will do it, and the look in her eye is like "Ohhhhhh!!!  *That's* what you wanted!"  and she'll do it...

    Now, if we can get them to actually retrieve something...




     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Is Your Dog Biddable or Non-Biddable?

    Hi, ML!  :)

    Interestingly enough, Gracie (also a retriever) had to be taught to retrieve (I felt ridiculous retrieving FOR her when she was a puppy).  And, "come" was her worst command, as well, and she didn't have an older dog to learn from! I did train her to come without fail if I ring a cow bell by giving her copious amounts of high value treats whenever she heard it.  It workes every time, and I only use it in emergencies.  It was more valuable before we had the electric fence because she could have been anywhere in the neighborhood, but once in awhile I still use it.

    Oh, yeah, if I so much as raise my voice to Gracie to correct her she jumps on me to try to knock me over so she can lick my face so hard I can barely breath (tongue up my nose!).  She has also been known to run in her crate (even though I've never used it as a punishment) to give herself a time out for bad behavior.  I've learned to be very gentle when I correct her, basically, just speaking a soft, "No," or other correction command like "Leave it," so she doesn't have a nervous breakdown.  
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from Maldenlady. Show Maldenlady's posts

    Re: Is Your Dog Biddable or Non-Biddable?

    Awww...Grracie!!

    About retrieving:  I've had several conversations with both dogs, explaining that they have this inbred, genetic predisposition to bring back what's thrown for them, hence the "retriever" part of their name.  They give me a look like:  "huh??  What the heck are you talking about??  *What* predisposition??  Bred to do *what*?"  I, too, have had someone throw something, retrieved it, and brought it back to the person who threw it in an effort to try to get them to understand.  Again, "the look".  As if to say, "Well, if you wanted it, why'd ya throw it?  If it's thrown, it's mine..."
     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Is Your Dog Biddable or Non-Biddable?

    Ha, Maldenlady, that's hilarious!!  We had the *exact* same conversation, to the letter in the same back yard scenario. LaughingLaughingLaughing
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from AGOODDOG. Show AGOODDOG's posts

    Re: Is Your Dog Biddable or Non-Biddable?

    Most Sporting and Herding class dogs are biddable.  To them, their handler's approval is paramount.  It's usually "Watch me! Did you see that?  Want me to do it again!"

    Scent and sight hounds are notorious for being non-biddable. Their philosophy is, "You aren't the boss of me!"

    Dogs learn good and bad manners and behaviors from other dogs. As trainers, we love having a biddable, well-trained dog available when teaching newbies.  There is a lot of "Monkey see, monkey do" going on.  May as well do it right the first time!
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from spoogedog. Show spoogedog's posts

    Re: Is Your Dog Biddable or Non-Biddable?

    I remember thinking about I would train my first lab to retrieve. He REALLY had the inbred, genetic predisposition to bring back what's thrown for him. He knew the difference between his ball and his Frisbee, and DON'T try to change the toy! That was 20 years ago. Today I have, supposedly two border collie/retrievers. Neither one has any clue about retrieving. Although, the more border collie of the two wants to please like no other dog I've ever had. Command him to come and he's flying towards me. Have any of you had a cat come on command? Ralph (gray tiger rescue) and I had a connection unlike I’ will ever have again. I would just whistle, and if he was in ear shot, he’d come running, answering my whistles with his mewing. I really, really miss him (he was my very first pet as a adult).

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Is Your Dog Biddable or Non-Biddable?

    Hi, spooge!  Sorry about Ralph. :(  I know I'll feel the same way when Gracie passes...I'll never have another pet like her.
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from Maldenlady. Show Maldenlady's posts

    Re: Is Your Dog Biddable or Non-Biddable?

    It's so interessting to me...

    If you observe how a dog behaves, either with humans or among other dogs at the dog park, for example, you really get a sense of dog etiquette and*their* sense of appropriate behavior.  Some of it is kinda cross-breed, some of it seems to be specific to breed.  Some of it is very individual to the specific dog.  An example:  certain dogs are perfectly OK with approaching another dog for the first time and just automatically playing; other dogs are not entirely OK with that.  Some just kinda know who's OK to approach, and who to stay away from.  It's as if there's a "dog code" of some sort...I know a Great Pyrenees who gets along great with all humans and other dogs, really a sweetie.  But there's one dog in the neighborhood -- I think he's a Shepherd mix..and oh, boy...the two of them have such words for each other whenever they see each other!  No fisticuffs; but a whole lot to say!  Something about each other just ticks them both off!  Curious thing...I'm not so sure it's a matter of manners per say, but it just seems to be a violation of some code that we humans don't quite get...anybody else notice this kind of thing?

     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Is Your Dog Biddable or Non-Biddable?

    If there's a code, Gracie is oblivious to it!  She always wants to say hello.  I have to decide for her who she can approach and who she should leave alone.
     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from ambergirl. Show ambergirl's posts

    Re: Is Your Dog Biddable or Non-Biddable?

    spoodog, I have 2 cats but only one will come on command.  It is actually the second cat I have owned that has done that.  I also found both of them highly affectionate. 
     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from ambergirl. Show ambergirl's posts

    Re: Is Your Dog Biddable or Non-Biddable?

    My dog Amber is 13 1/2 and deaf and blind in one eye and I have noticed when i take her to the groomer, the other dogs come to say hello and she is not interested and they actually leave her alone. I do believe they have their own language. 
     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from AGOODDOG. Show AGOODDOG's posts

    Re: Is Your Dog Biddable or Non-Biddable?

    Ours is not to question why...dogs are no different than people.  For reasons known only to them, occasionally they just don't like another dog.  Sometimes we need to simply respect and accept their feelings about that particular dog.
     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from Maldenlady. Show Maldenlady's posts

    Re: Is Your Dog Biddable or Non-Biddable?

    Note to all retrievers out there:

    Fetching a stick, prancing around triumphantly with it, then laying down 15 feet away from me and happily chomping on it does not constitute "retrieve".  Sigh.
     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Is Your Dog Biddable or Non-Biddable?

    In Response to Re: Is Your Dog Biddable or Non-Biddable?:
    [QUOTE]Note to all retrievers out there: Fetching a stick, prancing around triumphantly with it, then laying down 15 feet away from me and happily chomping on it does not constitute "retrieve".  Sigh.
    Posted by Maldenlady[/QUOTE]

    Could you repeat that a little louder so Gracie can hear you?  She doesn't listen when I tell her that.  Thanks! ;)

     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from SSBride09. Show SSBride09's posts

    Re: Is Your Dog Biddable or Non-Biddable?

    "Scent and sight hounds are notorious for being non-biddable. Their philosophy is, "You aren't the boss of me!"

    I'd say this is definitely true of my hound mix.  Actually I would describe both she and my schnoodle as non-biddable.  They are both fairly obedient now due to extensive training, but mostly because they know I control the treats/food/play time and anything else they value.  In fact if I show either of them that I'm too pleased by excessively patting or praising them they will "shake it off" or pretty much yawn in my face. 

    Overall they are great dogs... just not naturally inclined to want to please me.
     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from ruthcatrin. Show ruthcatrin's posts

    Re: Is Your Dog Biddable or Non-Biddable?

    My Tibetan Mastiff pup is like that.  He enjoy's the praise, but its definetly not his goal in life.

    And no, he doesn't fetch very well.  Maybe a 3rd of the time he'll bring the ball back to us, but even then he may not drop it.  He does play a mean game of keep away though....which is pretty typical for the breed.  Don't get a TM if you want to play lots of fetch!  DO get one if you want to spend 15 minutes chasing the dog to get the ball back so you can throw it again!  Ah well, it means I get as much exercise as my dog does, which isn't a bad thing.  Its not that he's not nessecarly biddable (when he wants to be), its just that sometimes he doesn't care to understand.
     
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