1. You have chosen to ignore posts from SSBride09. Show SSBride09's posts

    Nails

    Is it ok not to trim a dogs nails... ever? 

    Despite several attempts I have not been able to get Penny's nails cut since adopting her 6 months ago.  The groomer has told me they are fine each time I've asked them to take a look (but I now wonder if that is really the case of its because she gets so crazy if you try to).  I brought her to the vet this week and they tried at the vets office (they even tried muzzling her but she fought back so hard they were only able to trim 3 nails and in the process cut her in 3 places). 

    The vet said they weren't too too bad and said in order to cut them they'd probably have to sedate her.  I really don't want to have to do that.  She does run around a lot and her nails don't really look that long.  I just always thought every month was the rule of thumb.

    I guess the second part to my question is how to get her more comfortable with it?  I know with a puppy your supposed to handle them a lot so they get used to this stuff but we missed that phase for her.  The vet said she seemed fear aggressive but I really haven't seen that side of her outside the vets office.
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from GoneToTheDogs39. Show GoneToTheDogs39's posts

    Re: Nails

    Some dogs are extremely adverse to it,  it's usually the small breeds that you have to watch,  sometimes their nails tend to curl under, so it's important to trim them every 4-6 weeks.

     But the larger dogs may never need their nails trimmed, as long as you walk/run them on pavement for at least 30 minutes per day,  this will cause the nails to naturally wear down.

     All you can do is gently touch/handle their paws every day during routine grooming,  so hopefully they get used to it, and less freaked out......but some dogs never cooperate.

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Nails

    There's not a dog out there that doesn't NEED it's nails trimmed regularly.

    Like Robin says, they get too long and either curl under or otherwise are putting too much pressure on the nailbed when they walk.  That is painful in and of itself and makes them prone to split nails.  

    Also, the longer the nail gets, the longer the quick gets!  So, if you don't cut them often enough, the quick gets longer and you can't simply cut them back to where they should be without hitting the quick.  If that happens, you'll have to cut them back as far as possible (just up to the quick) and then recut every two weeks until the quick recedes back to where it's supposed to be so the nail can be as short as it's supposed to be.  I know because I made that mistake with Gracie.  It was a BIG MISTAKE, but it's corrected, now, and we are back to once a month trims.

    It took me about a year and a half to be comfortable cutting Gracie's nails and for her to allow me to do it.  It took persistance, patience, and lots of treats and praise.  And, at first, my husband had to help; he held her, and I cut her nails.

    I've hit the quick twice.  It happens, but everyone gets over it.  Not that I didn't feel terrible (I cried, actually), but the mistake can be overcome, and I learned from it.  I feel pretty confident now that I won't let that happen again - I know what I'm doing and what I'm looking for, finally, and she doesn't squirm and pull away as much.

    I recommend the scissor type (not the guillotine), but do NOT use the quick guard on the scissors; it allows you to go too far and, ironically, is what caused me to get her quick once.  Push the quick guard out of the way so you can see what you're doing.

    I wish I had good advice about making her happy about it, but I don't have anything other than enlist the help of someone she trusts as much as you to hold, comfort, and feed her treats while you do a couple of nails a day until they are all trimmed (it might take a week per month to get them all).  Don't try to do all the nails in one sitting.  I was happy to get ONE in one session when I first started with Gracie.  It took about 6 months before we could even attempt (as a husband wife team) to do all her nails at once.  

    ETA:  Oh, yeah, I would manipulate the scissors near her nails because it made a bit of a noise.  I'd praise her and give her a treat as if I'd actually made a cut.  She learned to associate the scissor noise with something good.  She still doesn't LOVE the process, but she tolerates it.
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from GoneToTheDogs39. Show GoneToTheDogs39's posts

    Re: Nails

    I have one dog that never gets her nails clipped, I tried once or twice,  the groomer tried, the Vet tried....everyone said just walk/run her on pavement/concrete for 30 minutes a day and she'll be fine , she is a medium size dog, almost 8 years old, all is ok.

      It is not mandatory that they get their nails clipped.  If the Vet and the groomer tell you it's ok,  don't worry about it.

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from RedFishBlueFish. Show RedFishBlueFish's posts

    Re: Nails

    Kargiver, some dogs really don't. My parents have had large breeds for over 30 years and have never cut a dog's nails. They live in Boston and walk the dogs on concrete for long periods of time daily. The nails just don't get very long and the dogs have never appeared uncomfortable walking on them.

    If they were in a more suburban or rural setting, that would be a different story. They have regular vet visits and it's never been considered a problem.
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Nails

    Robin and RFBF, thanks for the correction - I had no idea!  The dogs in our area don't spend much time on pavement.  The smaller dog next door has nails like talons because they don't cut them, and you see what happened to Gracie, too, when I avoided it too long, so I figured that was that.

    Good to know!
     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from RedFishBlueFish. Show RedFishBlueFish's posts

    Re: Nails

    Theirs are longer than Gracie's, but not dangerously. They aren't sharp either, although they do scratch the wood floors a little. It just feels like they are filed. No talons! Smile

     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Nails

    My DH installed and finished our soft pine floors himself so he's super crazy about them.  I told him if he wanted a lab and perfect wood floors he should have put in maple, LOL. 
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from SSBride09. Show SSBride09's posts

    Re: Nails

    Funny since we're in the suburbs so she actually doesn't spend a ton of time walking on pavement since its mostly grass.  But they do have a cement area she runs around at at doggie daycare a few times a week and there is a stone wall near our entryway she loves to perch herself on.  I've attached a pic of her nails standing normally on that wall.  Think they look too long?  This is after 6 months of no trims.

    A friend recommended trying to start by just filing her nails with a regular nail file so she just gets used to her paws being handled.  I might try that approach.

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from SSBride09. Show SSBride09's posts

    Re: Nails


     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from GoneToTheDogs39. Show GoneToTheDogs39's posts

    Re: Nails

    No! They're not too long!   Some dogs have one nail higher up on the inner side [dew claws], and those can curl.  Do you have a sidewalk you could run her on, even 20 minutes a day would work.  Her nails look fine,  look,  they're not even touching the ground.

      Whatever your doing now,  appears to be adequate,  I wouldn't bother with the file,  it would be easier to drive her to a sidewalk and have her walk/run for 30 minutes, at least every other day.  If she can't tolerate nail clipping, she won't put up with filing.

     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from SSBride09. Show SSBride09's posts

    Re: Nails

    We do have lots of sidewalks/side streets in our neighborhood and I have been meaning to take up running.  So maybe this is just another reason to get in shape!

     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from GoneToTheDogs39. Show GoneToTheDogs39's posts

    Re: Nails

    Exactly!  Think of her as your personal trainer.

       Funny thing is,  I have a dog with a slight weight problem, so I walk her 3 miles per day,  the reality is, I'm probably getting more out of it than she is!

      I do this on sidewalk,  so no nail clipping needed, the winters are a challenge, however.

      It's also an excellent way to get to know your neighbors,  and if your dog ever gets loose, they will recognize her.

        Don't forget,  bring plastic bags and pick up after your dog,  people are watching.

     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from DirtyWaterLover. Show DirtyWaterLover's posts

    Re: Nails

    Dogs that frequently get taken for walks on pavement are less likely to need their nails trimmed.

    One way to make dogs less bothered by the process of getting their nails clipped is to regularly rub their toes and give them treats. 

    One way to make a dog even more adverse to having it's nails clipped is to trim them too much and hit the quick.  Very painful.
     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Nails

    I think her nails look like they are the perfect length and in good health.
     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from ruthcatrin. Show ruthcatrin's posts

    Re: Nails

    her nails look good to me too, and yes walking on concrete will help keep them short.  Just watch out if she has dew claws (thumbs basically, possible on both back and front paws), as those won't get worn down and WILL need to be trimmed before they curl around and pierce the skin.

    Is it handling her paws at all thats the problem, or just the trimming her nails?  If she won't let you handle her paws at all, or only a little before freaking out, you DO have a potential problem that you'll want to see if you can over come.  For health and safety reasons of both her and anyone who may have to handle her.

    To help desensitize her to letting you touch her paws, carefully and slowly run your hands down her legs to her paws, JUST before she freaks out, stop and give her a treat (something really really nice that she doesn't normally get, a small peice of cheese, or turkey or something) and tell her how good she is.  Repeat as often as possible, but watch out, pushing to hard may push her freakout point sooner.  You should (eventually, it make take a long time) be able to push a little further and further till you can handle her paws in general.  Once you can, rub a little Musher's Secret or Bag Balm into the pads (just a little, unless they're dry and cracked, you don't want to mess them up, plus it can get messy on your floors), which should feel good to her, as well as giving her treats.  With lots of time and patience you should be able to work her to the point where handling her paws isn't a scary issue any more.
     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Nails

    Ruth, great advice!  I have to agree about topical paw stuff makes a mess of floors, though.  You get paw prints galore that are VERY hard to clean.

    (If cracked pads are an issue, what works best for Gracie is an oral zinc supplement.  She has chronic problems in the winter that clear up dramatically with the zinc, and this is the first summer we've had her on it, and her feet are noticably healthier even in this non-harsh weather.  This is the exact stuff we use:  Zinc for Dogs)
     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from ruthcatrin. Show ruthcatrin's posts

    Re: Nails

    Definetly, in this case though I ment it as kinda a massage "oil" type thing rather than a treatment.  You want to use just enough to make it easy to rub her pads, so that it feels good, but not enough to really soften them or leave a noticable residue.  We do that with our puppy to KEEP him used to having his paws handled and rubbed and he seems to like it.

    If she does have problems with her pads then definetly use what you need to.
     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Nails

    I found that the tiniest amount smudges wood floors, and these floors are the bain of my existance as it is.  I wish they were finished with oil instead of poly.  
     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from ruthcatrin. Show ruthcatrin's posts

    Re: Nails

    Hm, never noticed smudges here with the little bit we use, but then we have laminate fake wood floors and I know the gloss is different.

    Something else you might try (and might be a bit easier to get) is Vitamin E oil.  Its sold in small bottles in the hand/nail care sections at the store.  I use it alot on my hands, and I don't see why it wouldn't work just fine on the dogs paw pads.  You'll only need the barest little bit at a time though, a drop or two will probly do the whole paw just fine, but it should soak in no problem with little to no residue.
     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Nails

    Ah, and that would be better for her, too, because she actually like to eat Bag Balm out of the can (gross!) if I turn my back a second.  Thanks!
     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from jharvey31. Show jharvey31's posts

    Re: Nails

    In Response to Re: Nails:
    [QUOTE]Some dogs are extremely adverse to it,  it's usually the small breeds that you have to watch,  sometimes their nails tend to curl under, so it's important to trim them every 4-6 weeks.  But the larger dogs may never need their nails trimmed, as long as you walk/run them on pavement for at least 30 minutes per day,  this will cause the nails to naturally wear down.  All you can do is gently touch/handle their paws every day during routine grooming,  so hopefully they get used to it, and less freaked out......but some dogs never cooperate.
    Posted by Robin39[/QUOTE]

    My dogs nails started to due this when he turned 9. The vet cut them on one of his check ups and I could here the poor dog screaming his head off it was awful. He never got to have it done again tho, he had an appointment but died of a seizer 4 days before. I miss him so much. I did however try to keep up with pedipaws in between visits so that they wouldn't get too bad
     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from pinkkittie27. Show pinkkittie27's posts

    Re: Nails

    Okay, so everyone here knows I've had a hard time with trimming my dog's nails. I had just about given up on ever bringing him anywhere, since I was so worried he might bite someone, and he never ever tries to bite in any other situation.
    Then, just last weekend, my friend watched him for me while I was out of town. She decided to try and use a grinder on his nails (she works at a doggie day care and does this all the time.)
    To  my surprise, she said that after the front paws, he let her do the back ones without a struggle at all.

    I think that, even though the sensation must have been weird to him, it was so different than what it usually feels like to get his nails done that he just didn't care.
    With the grinder, there isn't any pressure really put on the nail, which is always uncomfortable for some dogs, especially those who've had their quicks cut before. So, they're not as afraid of getting cut since it's a different sensation.

    So maybe bring her to a groomer that has a grinder next time and see how that goes.
     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from Novembride. Show Novembride's posts

    Re: Nails

    Good point pink.  I've always had Jax's nails grinded (ground?), never cut or clipped.  I get it done at PetSmart grooming. Its only $11.  I've watched and he doesn't seem to mind it at all.
     
  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from GoneToTheDogs39. Show GoneToTheDogs39's posts

    Re: Nails

    In Response to Re: Nails:

    In Response to Re: Nails : I miss him so much.  Posted by jharvey31

     Sorry for your loss.

     Consider getting another dog ASAP,  check your local shelters first.

        PS:  He wouldn't want you to be sad.
    Is this the same dog that had the dental work?    

     

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