1. You have chosen to ignore posts from ambergirl. Show ambergirl's posts

    Re: Nails

    Did jharvey say when her dog passed?  I don't think I could get another dog ASAP if my Amber died.  You need time to grieve IMO.
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Nails

    jharvey, so sorry for your loss.
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from pinkkittie27. Show pinkkittie27's posts

    Re: Nails

    grief is valid and important. unprocessed grief can lead to a world of problems.
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Nails

    grief is the most damaging of stress emotions; sidestepping it can cause it to manifest in any number of emotional and/or physical ways.  It doesn't just go away w/out dealing w/it head on.
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from Amethyst2. Show Amethyst2's posts

    Re: Nails

    I'm sort of between the two points of view...I have a great respect for grief as a process that needs to be acknowledged.  On the other hand, I've seen people *stay* in their grief and isolate themselves.  I think that can be incredibly damaging, and I fully believe that overall health can be compomised that way.  There is a mind/body connection.  The goal should be to get it out of your system, and prepare to move toward the future.
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Nails

    it's like any negative emotion, undealt with or over indulged are both problematic
     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from GoneToTheDogs39. Show GoneToTheDogs39's posts

    Re: Nails


    Everyone is different,  but  I find grief to be a wasted emotion,  I think it is healthier and more constructive for all involved to pour those feelings and energy into helping and caring for another living thing.

        Sadness can affect your immune system in a negative way.

       Just my opinion,  but I wouldn't hesitate to get another dog right away.

      Not everyone has the need or desire to grieve.

        Some people just dust themselves off,   and move on.

    For those who think they may benefit from some counseling and support regarding the loss of a pet:    www.mspca.org/programs/pet-owner-resources/counseling-support-services/   

     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from jharvey31. Show jharvey31's posts

    Re: Nails

    In Response to Re: Nails:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: Nails :  Sorry for your loss.                                                                                                       Consider getting another dog ASAP,  check your local shelters first.     PS:  He wouldn't want you to be sad. Is this the same dog that had the dental work?    
    Posted by Robin39[/QUOTE]
     
    Thank you
    Yes that was him, he had just had a check up in March and they said he was in good health. He wasn't even showing any signs of being ill, he was his normal self up until that day. :( I am definantly going to adopt, I am going to look for one that is close to my other Bostons age (1 1/2).
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from jharvey31. Show jharvey31's posts

    Re: Nails

    In Response to Re: Nails:
    [QUOTE]jharvey, so sorry for your loss.
    Posted by kargiver[/QUOTE]

    Thank you
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from jharvey31. Show jharvey31's posts

    Re: Nails

    In Response to Re: Nails:
    [QUOTE]Did jharvey say when her dog passed?  I don't think I could get another dog ASAP if my Amber died.  You need time to grieve IMO.
    Posted by ambergirl[/QUOTE]

    He passed on June 1st. At first I didn't want to get another dog but seeing my other Boston looking for him and then she tries to play with my landlords 2 dogs and they aren't really much for playing it's sad. I am going to sign her up for doggy daycare so she can make friends. When I do adopt another dog I am not going to get another Boston tho, I am thinking a pug. I know there will never be another one like him ever. He was smart, so well behaved never a problem dog at all and everyone he met fell in love with him. The whole neighborhood knows his name and not mine lol
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from GoneToTheDogs39. Show GoneToTheDogs39's posts

    Re: Nails

    Glad your ok,  I know it can be rough.   Let your local shelters and animal control officer know what you are looking for,  they will keep you in mind.  

      They are all different with unique personalities,  that's what makes it so interesting getting to know a new one,  when your ready of course.  Take care.

     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from Novembride. Show Novembride's posts

    Re: Nails

    jharvey, I too am sorry for your loss. 

    Not sure where you live, but in addition to doggie day care there is a Boston Terrier Meetup that meets once a month at DoggyDay, and another playgroup for Bostons once a month at Fenway Bark. I have taken puppy to the Fenway Bark one.  Its a great time for the dogs, and a riot for the humans to watch all those BTs running around.
     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from jharvey31. Show jharvey31's posts

    Re: Nails

    I did have him cremated and returned to me, his aunty bought a nice urn and the vet that was working when I rushed him in sent a card and inside was a little paper with his dates on it and his paw print. I also got a tattoo of his name and paw prints on the inside of my wrist which I had planned on doing before but never got around to it. He will never be forgotten and I just keep trying to think about all the fun stuff we did. I don't like grieving (no one does) but I have to do it to deal with it. It's not good at all to keep it in. Even if you do keep busy eventually it will all come back on you.
     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from jharvey31. Show jharvey31's posts

    Re: Nails

    In Response to Re: Nails:
    [QUOTE]jharvey, I too am sorry for your loss.  Not sure where you live, but in addition to doggie day care there is a Boston Terrier Meetup that meets once a month at DoggyDay, and another playgroup for Bostons once a month at Fenway Bark. I have taken puppy to the Fenway Bark one.  Its a great time for the dogs, and a riot for the humans to watch all those BTs running around.
    Posted by Novembride[/QUOTE]

    Thank you
    oh we may have to check it out. I am in Worcester and I drive by Barkwood Inn everyday on my way to work, it looks nice from the website so we are going to take a tour and see if she will be good there.
     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from jharvey31. Show jharvey31's posts

    Re: Nails

    In Response to Re: Nails:
    [QUOTE]It's sounds like he was your favorite,  he was very lucky to have had 10 years with you,  and know he was loved.   You may dream of him occasionally,  I hope that brings you comfort.    I would like to think that love never dies,  and that someday we will see our loved ones again [4 footed included].
    Posted by Robin39[/QUOTE]


    Thank you, it does help to talk about him, which is weird because I hardly ever talk about stuff that upsets me to anyone really. My cousin told me that people in heaven never get sick of throwing the tennis ball and that helped thinking about that. He would play fetch for hours on end. lol
     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from pinkkittie27. Show pinkkittie27's posts

    Re: Nails

    Everyone needs to grieve, regardless of whether or not they have the desire to. That's not an opinion, that's a fact.

    From PubMedHealth ncbi.nlm.nih.gov:
    "Grief should not be prevented because it is a healthy response to loss. Instead, it should be respected. Those who are grieving should have support to help them through the process."

    avoiding grief, or trying to move on before you're ready can lead to a lot of problems. It's not wasted time, it's important time spent dealing with healthy, normal emotions in response to a loss.
    And frankly, I think it's irresponsible to suggest that grief is anything but normal, healthy and worthy of respect. People who are grieving should not be made to feel guilty about their feelings.
     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from GoneToTheDogs39. Show GoneToTheDogs39's posts

    Re: Nails

    My cousin told me that people in heaven never get sick of throwing the tennis ball and that helped thinking about that. He would play fetch for hours on end. lol
    Posted by jharvey31[/QUOTE]

    Not sure if this would be convenient for you,  but if you would like to have a memorial service for your pet:   www.calvaryepiscopal-danvers.org      click on pet ministry,   they have a cookout coming up,   might be a nice day trip for you and your other dog.

       They also have a pet loss support group you may be interested in,  I think they meet once per month.   www.boston.com/community/pets/articles/2011/05/30/ministry_embraces_owners_and_pets/

     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from SSBride09. Show SSBride09's posts

    Re: Nails

    Just a quick update to let you all know Penny had her nails trimmed yesterday!  I was so proud!

    I was talking to the groomer at the doggie daycare I bring them to about her issues.  She said she had a lot of experience with dogs who were skittish about having their nails done and asked to give it a try.  Success!  Even though her nails don't get too long naturally, at least now I don't have to worry about it.
     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Nails

    Great news, SSBride!  I think all dogs can learn to accept the process, but it takes time and commitment like you've shown.  Congrats on the victory!!

    (And, I totally agree with Pinkkittie regarding the suggestion that grief is useless.  To suggest that is a personality-based, person by person need (desire?) is detrimental to anyone who subsequently tries to sidestep the grieving process.  That person can end up with unexplained headaches, digestive issues, even heart problems because of it even while they are "enjoying" ignoring their loss and "moving on" without working through it in a healthy manner.  No one is suggesting wallowing in grief indefinitely is healthy, which it isn't, but grief has a very necessary place in the human experience whether we like it - who does - or not.)
     
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