1. You have chosen to ignore posts from minipup. Show minipup's posts

    Re: Obedience classes?

    Cooper is starting to drive me nuts!!! I love the little guy, but man, is he starting to act like a real puppy!!! Lots of chewing, nipping (we are working on that HARD), couple of accidents a day, and now, whenever we bring him outside to go potty all he wants to do is chase leaves and eat EVERYTHING in sight. How did you guys keep that from happening? I swear this dog would eat anything.

    Don't worry, I still love him.

    But he can not start his classes until his third round of shots, which isn't until January....ahhh!

    He is still great with the crate, though!



    I only look innocent....
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Obedience classes?

    I maintain that he's not having accidents because he hasn't made the connection yet and, therefore, can't go "by accident" in the house.

    To get him to go when you go outside, you have to be stearn and put him on a leash.  Take him to his potty place and give the command until he performs his duty.  Then, treat and praise like crazy as you go back inside.

    He should be showing signs of avoiding things you shake a can every time at.  Gracie learned to not step on the oriental rugs within a week because she hated the sound of the coins.

    GL!!

    ETA:  I have to say that if he's going 2 times a day in the house you are not being careful enough about the timer and/or insistent enough (leash and command, no playful tone) that he go when told.  What is happening the 20 minutes before he goes in the house?  Was he allowed inside without having done his business because it looked like he just wanted to play?  Going outside to pee should not resemble going outside to play, and a leash and stearn, solid tone will convey that.

    Sounds like you are discovering why I didn't think having a puppy was a boatload of fun.

    Oh, and Gracie had 2 episodes of going in the house a day at first, too.  Just thinking about it gives me a headache.
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from bigpuppy. Show bigpuppy's posts

    Re: Obedience classes?

    I guess I was really lucky with Bosco because he had so few misses in the house. One thing that I did was get the puppy piddle pads and used them for 1 week only by the door that I use for him to go out (a short enough time that he didn't learn it was ok to go in the house). That way I knew when he needed to go and could scoop him up and right out the door to his pee spot and he got used to going to the door when he needed to go. He really learned quickly.

    The chewing is another matter and I wish I could help you there - Bosco just grew out of it, but not before he took the corners off of most of the window sills in the house (along with at least 4 bathroom rugs, 3 or 4 dog beds, etc.). I still don't give him stuffed toys because he just eats them. He does get a rawhide chew a day, but those aren't good for puppies.

    This time of year will drive everyone with a dog nuts - I don't know what it is about leaves, but it takes 5 times as long to go for a walk since he has to inspect every leaf that's fallen.

    There are just a lot of things that you have to let go. Bosco gets away with some things that I know other dog owners won't allow (such as getting on the furniture), but I pick my battles with him and overall he's a really good boy.

    If you feel you really can't wait for another month or so before his shots are finished and he can start the classes, look into a couple of private sessions with a trainer that comes to your house. You only need to wait for his shots to be completed for him to go to classes with other puppies.

    That photo of Cooper is fabulous, though - it's as if they know how cute they are and use it every chance they get! Bosco still has it down pat ...
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Obedience classes?

    The thing about their destroying things is that you can't leave them alone unless they are in their crate.  If you're against putting them periodically in their crate while you can't watch their every move, the consequence is destroyed things.

    We haven't had one thing destroyed, and it WASN'T because she wasn't highly willing and capable of destroying everything within reach.  It was solely because I was either on top of her every move with the can of coins to correct bad behavior and redirect and praise immediately for subsequent good behavior OR she was in her crate.  She went in her crate while I showered, used the restroom, etc.  No surprises of destruction that way because no chance of her getting a hold of anything long enough to destroy it.

    Now that she's not a puppy anymore and knows and obeys the rules, we leave her out of her crate alone.  I even leave the house and don't always crate her.

    I don't judge those who don't believe in crating - everybody is entitled to handle their dog their own way.  But, we were unwilling to accept the consquences of not crating while Gracie was a destructive puppy.  She grew up with a wire crate, but now has this one DH built.





     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from minipup. Show minipup's posts

    Re: Obedience classes?

    Kargiver, the thing is though, he peees every time we bring him out, but it seems like out of no where he will have an accident. But, I guess we are just not taking into consideration that he is still a puppy and can't feel it coming on.

    All in all, he is doing great and we are lucky that he isn't a crazy puppy. I have heard absolute horror stories. At least he lets us sleep thru the night!

    And as for the leaves, I guess it is all just fun distraction. And bigpuppy I am actually looking into having a trainer come to our house, thank you for the suggestion!
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from DirtyWaterLover. Show DirtyWaterLover's posts

    Re: Obedience classes?

    Puppies are tough.  I think that's why God made them so cute.

    I think the best way to house break is to take him out of his crate and go outdoors on a leach to take care of his business.  Pick a word to use like "potty".  Take him the spot where you want him to go, and say "potty" over and over until he goes.  When he starts to go potty, give him lots, and lots of verbal praise and maybe even a treat. 

    If he doesn't go potty after a few minutes, then it's back into the crate for 1/2 hour.  If he does go potty, let him play for a few minutes - never go back into the house directly after he goes potty.   He'll associate peeing with going back into the house and if he doesn't want to go back into the house, he'll delay the peeing.

    If you have a fenced in back yard, it's a good idea to still put him on leash and take him to a spot where you want him to go potty.  This will train him to go in the one area every time - saving your yard from brown spots in the summer and well savving you from having to avoid the little turd mines all over your yard.

    As a puppy, he shouldn't left unattended.  You might want to get a shot 4 ft lead for him to wear around the house.  After he's gone potty, it's ok to let him run around, but after an hour or so, you might want to put him back in his crate for a nap, followed by a trip outside to potty.

    If you see him go potty in the house, then a sharp, "no", and take him outside to the spot where you want him to go potty where you can set him down and say "potty".

    Here's the controversial part - if he does go potty in the house and you catch him after the fact, take him to his accident, show it to him, and a sharp no, no, no.  You don't have to stick his nose in it or anything.  Just show it to him and give him a "no".  I had to do this with one dog in every room of the house.  He hated going potty outside, particularly when it rained.  He figured out he couldn't go potty in the living room, so he thought maybe the dining room was OK.  Then the kitchen.  Then the bedrooms.

    Treats/praise when he does it right and correction when he does it wrong.

    Oh, one last thing.  teach him to tell you when he wants to go outside.  Some people use a bell.  I taught my dog to bark.  I first taught him how to speak on command.  (I say speak.  When he barks, he gets a treat).  Then I took him to the back door, said "speak", and when he barked, I shoo'ed him out the door.  I did this a few times and he got it.  Well, I should say, one of my dogs got it.  The one that needed to be taught the he couldn't go potty in each room never got it.  He just comes over to me and gives me a "look".

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Obedience classes?

    If he goes every time you take him out and he's still going in the house, you aren't taking him out often enough preemptively.  Boy dogs, especially, can always pee.  Take him out more times per day, always on a leash, and ONLY give him the potty command, no playing, petting, or whatever until he pees.  When he pees, give him plenty of praise and play.

    ETA:  It's not out of "nowhere" it's out of bladder size.
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from pinkkittie27. Show pinkkittie27's posts

    Re: Obedience classes?

    I agree that tethering him to yourself will help with the accidents. that way, when he starts to pee or pooo, you can pick him up straight away and say "No! Outside!" and then go outside, where if he finishes, you can praise him.

    it's just like the re-directing with the chewing. it will work, just be patient.

    the tethering will also make it so that he can't have an accident that you only discover later. I firmly believe that showing a puppy their accident doesn't work, and is, at best, far less effective than correcting them while they're in the act.
    if you can't be watching him every second, tether him or crate him. you'll catch him in the act and he'll put 2 and 2 together a little quicker.
    it's tough, but it won't last forever.

    when Max was a puppy he had a bad habit of sneaking off to go pee in the house. so, we just started putting him in his crate or holding his leash if we couldn't give him 100% of our attention. Two times he wet the bed in his crate, and after having to sit in his own pee for a little bit AND get a bath afterwards, he leaned his lesson. from then on the only times he ever had accidents was when we would forget to walk him at the 6 hour mark.
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Obedience classes?

    Yes, be patient.  It took 3 months for Gracie to be considered somewhat reliable, and even at that point her signal that she had to go out was very weak.  I was so frustrated and disappointed that I wrote to a animal behaviorist on Just Answrer.com and paid $15 to ask about it!  He said she was absolutely right on track for her age.  I know there is a bell curve, and some dogs are quicker, some slower, but he said our experience with 3 months is average.
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from minipup. Show minipup's posts

    Re: Obedience classes?

    Thank you all for the suggestions. Kargiver, we will start bringing him out more often, because he is still too young and not trained enough to give us singles yet. DWL, thank you for all of your help, it was so helpful! I will do everything you have suggested, and let you know it works out. He has a home evaluation with Compatible Canines out of Brookline on December 2nd. They will come to our home, and tell us everything we need to do to help him in his early years, also, they will evaluate his behavior, then start training at home until he is old enough to be with other dogs (i.e. all of his shots are done). We are very excited about it!

    We are not perfect, but we are trying very hard.
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Obedience classes?

    If you expect him to signal too early you'll be constantly disappointed.  Just accept that he can't do it yet, take him out more often, ensure he pees, and you'll have fewer times he goes in the house because physiologically he only has to pee/p00 so often.

    And, remember, signaling doesn't start off being very clear.  It's not like suddenly he'll start going to the door and crying when he needs to go out.  He'll start to put it together that he isn't supposed to go in the house, but what to do about it won't come immediately.  He might start suddenly losing interest in playing, wander off, wimper wherever he is (not at the door), etc.  Be extremely attentive to his subtle behavior changes.

    It's really a many stepped process that's quite complicated:

    Step 1:  feel the urge to pee/p00 before it's happening (totally involentary, completely physiologically driven)

    Everything after Step 2 is totally unnatural for a dog who isn't trying to preserve the cleanliness of his sleeping area.

    Step 2:  understand that when you feel the need to go you can't just go (the psychological component to holding it)

    Step 3:  learn to hold it (the physiological component of contracting the muscles necessary to hold it)

    Step 4:  understand the difference between "inside" and "outside" with respect to elimination issues  (and that "inside" means house, car, store, etc)

    Step 4:  learn that you only "go" outside

    Step 5:  learn how to let the human know that he has to go outside in time to make it (they need to experiment with you to find the signal that works every time by getting you to understand right away that he has to go out)

    Step 6:  do it every time
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from DirtyWaterLover. Show DirtyWaterLover's posts

    Re: Obedience classes?

    In Response to Re: Obedience classes?:
    [QUOTE]Thank you all for the suggestions. Kargiver, we will start bringing him out more often, because he is still too young and not trained enough to give us singles yet. DWL, thank you for all of your help, it was so helpful! I will do everything you have suggested, and let you know it works out. He has a home evaluation with Compatible Canines out of Brookline on December 2nd. They will come to our home, and tell us everything we need to do to help him in his early years, also, they will evaluate his behavior, then start training at home until he is old enough to be with other dogs (i.e. all of his shots are done). We are very excited about it! We are not perfect, but we are trying very hard.
    Posted by minipup[/QUOTE]

    I've worked with one of the trainers from Compatible Canines and he's very, very good.  They share the same philosophy about dogs that Pawsitive Dog has.

    When I first started going to training, I was amazed at how obedient the dogs were.  They have dog beds along one wall with dog lying quietly in the beds - no leash.  If one started to rise up, the trainer would call it's name and say, "down" or "go to bed" and the dog would lie back down.  At the time, I couldn't even walk my dog because he strained at the leash.  I never thought my dog could lie on a bed like that without getting up.  Now, no problem.  I can put him in a sit and walk away and and he won't move until I call him.  We regularly do this at the Commons and Public Gardens with all of the duck, geese, and squirrels.  He won't budge.  And he's a terrier so he's overcoming his natural prey instinct, which is very strong - he's killed squirrels before.

    You'll be happy with Compatible Canine.  If I weren't going to Pawsitive Dog, I'd be going to Compatible Canine.
     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from revdani. Show revdani's posts

    Re: Obedience classes?

    I show my dog in obedience, rally and agility and we're still working on things that he decides he's not going to do. Today he nearly pulled me off my feet going after a squirrel.  And he absolutely knows how to heel.  My trainer says that when you fix one thing another thing pops up.  Just be consistent. And, as another of my trainers told me years ago, when you praise your dog do it in a way that will make everyone around you think you've lost your mind :) Also, regarding house breaking....years ago it took me three years to house break my Yorkie. I think terrier breeds, especially males are really difficult to housebreak. My current dog is a Wheaten Terrier and he actually would go in his crate! I never had a dog do that before.  I have found that the more time I spend training and working with my dog the stronger bond I have with him.  It builds a great relationship. RevDani
     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from katie2101978. Show katie2101978's posts

    Re: Obedience classes?

    In Response to Re: Obedience classes?:
    If you live on the South Shore, try K-9 Daycare.  They have puppy and obedience training.
     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from DirtyWaterLover. Show DirtyWaterLover's posts

    Re: Obedience classes?

    I think it's incredible how different 2 dogs can be, even dogs that are the same breed.  My guys are only 10 days a part in age and share alot of the same genes.  They couldn't be more different.

    One sits like a champ - right beside me.  If he's too far back, all I have to do is tap my leg and he slides forward.  The other one, I think passive aggressive is an understatement.  He'll sit, but it's always in a relaxed manner, slouching to one side.  If I try to put him the correct position, he just melts like he doesn't have a bone in his body.  He knows how to do everything - just getting himn to do it is the tough part. 

    One needs stiff correction and lots and lots of praise and reward.  Constant reward and praise.  The other one just gets it.  He needs a little correction and praise but nearly as much as the other one.

    The one that's easy to train will walk all over someone that doesn't know how to handle him.  The lazy one can be frustrating.

    The secret to training a dog is persistence and calmness.  If you get frustrated, your dog will sense it and will shut down.  Positive attitude is a must.  You have to be upbeat. 

    Some dogs require more praise and stiffer corrections.  And some dogs just love to obedience training.

    If it isn't fun, then it isn't effective training.  If it isn't fun, then stop for the day or at least give yourself a time out to center yourself and become enthusiastic about what you are doing.

    It's OK to decide to cut the training session short every now and then.
     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from pinkkittie27. Show pinkkittie27's posts

    Re: Obedience classes?

    DWL- I couldn't agree more that one of the most important part of training a dog is knowing when to take a break for yourself. It can be so exhausting and frustrating at times, and those are the times when you've got to just stop for 15 minutes and then try again. One of the hardest things my DH had to learn was that Max won't respond to a command if he thinks you're angry or upset, and that repeating the command over and over or saying "No!" over and over works against you in the training process. Say it once, say it calmly.
     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from BreedTrust. Show BreedTrust's posts

    Re: Obedience classes?

    It sounds like you've received plenty of good advice and have a plan in place with Compatible Canines, which is great!

    You may be interested in this new article in Psychology Today published yesterday by best-selling animal behavior author and psychologist Stanley Coren, about reward-based training vs. discipline-based training.  In the article he also discusses the benefits of classical conditioning. 

    I'm a big proponent of clicker training, which is a form of reward based training based on operant conditioning that I've used for my own dogs.  The pioneer of clicker training, Karen Pryor, is world-renowned and is based out of Massachusetts.  Her training academy (for trainers) was featured in an article in BARK Magazine last month about Finding a Good Dog Trainer.  She has an academy in Waltham to train dog trainers from around the country in clicker training.  If you google Karen Pryor or clicker training you'll find tons of articles about the great benefits of this for your dog. 

    Good luck from the pet lovers at Breed Trust - a website dedicated to pet owners and the businesses that serve them.
     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Obedience classes?

    I wish we'd started out with clicker training.  The edible treats are difficult to manage from a weight perspective especially for our chow hound.  I swear, when we were teaching her to stay downstairs she'd run upstairs just to get a treat when she came down.  She'd do it 3 times in a row before I simply put her in her crate for a few minutes to end the up/down/treat cycle.  That put the kibosh on that plan, but it took awhile for me to catch on.  She's crafty when it comes to food.  I doubt she'd have hatched that plan if we'd used a clicker.
     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from pinkkittie27. Show pinkkittie27's posts

    Re: Obedience classes?

    if you clicker-train, do you always have to have a clicker on you?

     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from BreedTrust. Show BreedTrust's posts

    Re: Obedience classes?

    Clicker training does require that you use food rewards initially, but it works and gets the attention of dogs because its positive.  It typically shouldn't be difficult with chow hounds because the dog associates the "click" with the food reward so when there is no click after running up and down a set of stairs they quickly realize there is no reward. 

    The food rewards should be a special treat (and anly use very tiny pieces of it to prevent excess calories).  A treat that they would otherwise never get works best; something they think is really special.  It is best to try clicker training after going to a class since there definitely is a skill to it and it is best to learn when and how to click properly from experts so as not to confuse the dog.

    You do need to carry the clicker with you when you're training and successful training (of any kind) requires constant repetition.  The clickers are very small and fit in the palm of your hand.  They're easy to carry in a pocket and some even have a little ring hole attachment so you can attach it to your keychain. 

    This short video by Virginia Broitman and Sherri Lippman is a good introduction to clicker training if you're considering it.
     
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