1. You have chosen to ignore posts from ambergirl. Show ambergirl's posts

    Re: Questions about adopting a dog

    Just sad nobody got what I was saying about the new breed of dog owners.. and it turned into a verbal slug fest. My thoughts and experience is very valid. Wanted to hear from others like me that think this hovering over our pets ridiculous. Ugh...
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Questions about adopting a dog

    Start a new thread on it - great subject!
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from ambergirl. Show ambergirl's posts

    Re: Questions about adopting a dog

    Thanks Kar. Too tired though and thinking the new generation of pet owners won't get it. Just missing Amber and want other pet owners that don't feed into the pet Guilt garbage that they are not alone and they are good pet owners.
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from ambergirl. Show ambergirl's posts

    Re: Questions about adopting a dog

    DL, please stop deleting your posts. Makes me crazy.. you have the right to post. Good, bad or ugly. Ok? I or others may not agree but we do not have the right to deny your posts. Unless the ugliest happens like LL's debacle happens again... then you should feel free. I am so amazed I should tell grown woman to be respectful. What do you give a sh@t about older womans conversations?? Really? You are better than that I'm sure. Seriously trying ti make peace. And thank you for your kind words about Amber. But this is not about that..
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Questions about adopting a dog

    Apparently, she'd rather delete her posts than admit she posted an article that included advice she vehemently disagrees with but didn't bother to point out as something to be wary of or downright ignore.

    It would have been so easy to just say, "Yes, we do have a responsibility to make sure the articles we recommend are acutally what we believe, and if they are not (in their entirety) to qualify them by pointing out the parts we disagree with.  I missed that bad 8 week old puppy advice in that one, thanks for pointing it out - I wouldn't want it to look like I believed or endorsed that part of an otherwise good article."  And, that would have been that.  But, noooooo.
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from dog-lady. Show dog-lady's posts

    Re: Questions about adopting a dog

    In Response to Re: Questions about adopting a dog:
    DL, please stop deleting your posts. Makes me crazy.. you have the right to post. Good, bad or ugly. Ok? I or others may not agree but we do not have the right to deny your posts. Unless the ugliest happens like LL's debacle happens again... then you should feel free. I am so amazed I should tell grown woman to be respectful. What do you give a sh@t about older womans conversations?? Really? You are better than that I'm sure. Seriously trying ti make peace. And thank you for your kind words about Amber. But this is not about that..
    Posted by ambergirl


    ? The only thing I deleted on this thread was a suggestion to listen to WBZ talk radio at night in response to your complaint of insomnia, I knew you had read it and it was off topic, everyone deletes!  Especially if something is repetitious.
     If it was such a bad thing it wouldn't be offered as an option.
      I appreciate it and use it respectfully, in my opinion.
     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from ambergirl. Show ambergirl's posts

    Re: Questions about adopting a dog

    It's not a bad thing DL.. just not necessary is what I'm saying.. thank you for the road map to Ache. He is liked on CC more than you think. That post you told me where to find Ache and then deleted is what bothered me. But all is good I hope :)
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from dog-lady. Show dog-lady's posts

    Re: Questions about adopting a dog

    Sure, no big deal!  What can I say, I'm a habitual deleter!  When I think things are off topic or of a personal nature I have a tendency to delete.              

    ETA: I used to delete my comments when I was being bullied by other posters...but most of them have stopped, plus I've learned to ignore and take comments that don't make any sense with a grain of salt, after all, this is the internet!

        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-b5aW08ivHU
        (music in the background)
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from ambergirl. Show ambergirl's posts

    Re: Questions about adopting a dog

    I have done it : ) rethought something I wrote and worried about hurt feelings. I hope to hear from Ache. I posted over there : )
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from pinkkittie27. Show pinkkittie27's posts

    Re: Questions about adopting a dog

    deleting only makes things worse because it's hard to follow the conversation or make sense of who's said what. It's one of the big reasons I don't bother to weigh in on most things here anymore (that and the woeful lack of newcomers). I would prefer if the forums only allowded the mods to delete comments. You can't take back your comments in real life, deleting them online makes it feel disingenuous or manipulative.
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from GoneToTheDogs39. Show GoneToTheDogs39's posts

    Re: Questions about adopting a dog

      Guest Post: veterinary perspective on adopting your cat or dog

    This month's topic is pet adoption and Dr Riggs talks about his experience with dog adoptions from a veterinary perspective.

    ________________________________________________________________________________________

    Rescuing or adopting has become the "new" way to acquire a new pet these days. People have seen or heard too much of the horrors of puppy mills and pet stores, and many have decided not to go this route. I could not be happier!

    In 27 years of practice I cant tell you how many sick and genetically defective animals I have seen from pet stores and poor breeders. Ohio has dubiously become a national supplier of puppy mill puppies in recent years, most commonly coming from Amish farms in the north central part of our state. Yes the Amish.

    It is not uncommon for me to not recognize the breed of the pet simply because of over breeding and poor genetic selection of parents; many of these animals have little resemblance to the breed they are supposed to be. It is sad. Sad for the animal. Sad for the family. The family who comes in to my hospital excited about their new pet, only to be told they have a seriously sick or congenital defective animal. So do not buy animals from a pet store. Do not even go in because you will be hooked.

    Ossa 11My wife and I have two rescue dogs. Ossa is a release dog from Canine Companions for Independence (CCI), a wonderful organization which I am honored to be associated with. CCI has very stringent requirements for their companion service dogs and Ossa was just a little shy. She is a golden retriever.

    This is a good place to stress that no matter what breed you are looking for; there is a breed rescue group. So you cant let the excuse of looking for a purebred dog exclude you from rescuing a dog.

    My other dog is Maggie, our pride and joy. I remember the day we got her at a local shelter. We went there to pick up a dog we had seen the day before, and we did. We were almost out the door when my wife spotted this adorable and pathetic mutt of a puppy, sitting at the door of her cage. I did not have a chance. We left with two new additions to our family. That was 17 years ago and Maggie the wonder dog is still with us and doing just fine.

    MaggieThis brings up a good point. Mix breed dogs are often healthier and live longer than purebred dogs. This often surprises people. Mix breed dogs have what is called hybrid vigor, which means they get best traits of both, or many breeds, of their parents. Purebred dogs have a decreased gene pool, due to breeding with the same breed over and over. Recessive genes are hidden genes, which can be expressed when breeding for a desired trait and resulting in unwanted genetic disorders. There are good breeders who try very hard to breed these defects out, but it is difficult.

    So what is the first thing you do when you get your new rescue pet? No you do not go to the pet store and buy all the things you dont need or get the food du jour from the teenager working that day!

    You take it to your vet to get a good exam and professional recommendations of what you need.

    HanThis first veterinary exam should be from head to toe, looking at the eyes, ears, teeth, skin, palpating the abdomen and listening to the heart. You should also have a fecal check even if this was just done.

    You need to realize the doctor might find some problems, ranging from minor to life threatening. You need to be informed of any possible problems. If problems are detected, you need to determine if you can deal with them. That is a personal decision. My hospital manager just adopted a 1 year old, deaf and partially blind dog. Many people would not be able to handle that, but Han (the white dog on the right) has found a great and loving home.

    I often say that dogs and cats have other senses that we do not have. I think they know when they are given a second chance. Rescue dogs just seem happier to me. You will be happy too, if you give an animal a second (or third or fourth) chance at a happy life.

     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from RogerTaylor. Show RogerTaylor's posts

    Re: Questions about adopting a dog

    "So do not buy animals from a pet store. Do not even go in because you will be hooked."

    Ha, ha, ha...Soooo true!  How do I know? I worked in a pet store as a kid for 4 years part -time. Selling a dog and thousands of dollars of crap with it - No problem. When parent's brought the kid in the store and the kid would get all excited by a puppy, I would pull it out of the display and let the kid play with it. Sometimes, not always, the kid begged and pleaded - Dad was no, Mom was yes as was the kid or kids, so Dad became the bad guy, Mom saved the day and the kid got a dog - oh yah, the pen, brush,food, collar, leash, suppliments, harness, dog line, toys, etc, etc,...a $50 "puppy mill" mutt for $2 grand! with AKC papers too!

    NEVER BUY A PET SHOP DOG!

     

     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from GoneToTheDogs39. Show GoneToTheDogs39's posts

    Re: Questions about adopting a dog

    I agree, except some of the shelters need to lighten up about the application/screening process.

    Often extensive personal information is requested,  have the people you are giving the info to had CORI checks (I doubt it).  Sometimes a home check and meeting with your entire household is required.

    They take multiple applications to evaluate who the best owner would be (in their opinion) especially for young dogs/puppies.  They don't get back to you in a reasonable amount of time to let you know if you've been rejected.

    They discriminate against single people, they assume they won't make arrangements for the dog to go out,  and if you tell them you work full time...forget about it.

    This is why many people turn to the Pet Shops, where all they have to do is pull out a credit card.    Granted, this is the other extreme and contributes to impulse buying and no screening.

    At those Pet Shops there is always at least 1 sad dog that is starting to get big and has been there too long, many times you can negotiate a low price and even get a bag of dog food thrown in!

    In my opinion,  that's a rescue too!

    PS: Not all shelters are difficult to deal with,  I'd start with local Animal Control, MSPCA, ARL. many of the Pet shop impulse buys end up there anyway.

    (The above comment is based on my experiences and also those of friends, not directed at any particular agency)

     
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