1. You have chosen to ignore posts from DirtyWaterLover. Show DirtyWaterLover's posts

    Re: Separation Anxiety/Howling

    Try this.

    Put the dog in a crate.  Put a prong collar on the dog and attach the leash with the leash hanging out of the crate.  Whenever the dog makes a noise while in the crate, say "quiet".  If the dog continues to make noise, say "quiet, quiet, quiet" over and over as you walk to the crate and give the dog a correction by tugging on the leash.  Don't be angry or frustrated, and don;t even look at the dog.  Just says "quiet" and give it a tug.  If the dog still makes noise, say "quiet" and give the leash 3 tugs.  Make the tugs harder if the dog continues to make noise.

    When the dog is in the crate and isn;t making noise, toos in some kibble.  The lesson is that being in the crate and making noise gets a correction but being quiet in the crate gets a reward.

    As the dog gets better about this and understands that it's getting a correction, then put the dog in the crate and leave the room, then leave the apartment/house.  Stay within ear shot and re-enter the apartment if the dog barks or howls and give a correction.  Say "quiet, quiet, quiet while you are still outside and as you approach the crate .  After a few minutes with the dog not barking/howling, then re-enter and give treats.

    Wait longer and longer between re-entering to give treats.  Remember, no anger or frustration.

    Ok, use this as a last resort.

    Use an e-collar with a remote.  Use one with variable settings and always check the level by zapping your own hand before you put it on the dog.  Put the dog in a crate.  If he howls/barks, give him a zap and say quiet.  Go outside, and if the dog starts to howl/bark, give him a zap.  If he doesn't bark/howl, give him a treat.  You may want to enlist the help of the neighbor that can hear the howling with this, particularly if you discover the dog stays quiet when you go outside, but starts howling when you drive off or walk away - it's amazing what they can hear.

    Yes I know the ecollar sounds horrible, but it's certainly better than being sent back to the shelter.
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Separation Anxiety/Howling

    DWL, love your correction/reward idea with the collar.  Gracie has one of those barbaric looking collars, and it works wonders on her walk.  She never complains about it and even sits nicely to have me slide it on her 'cause she knows it means we're going somewhere fun for her.  I would never have thought of crate training an adult dog that way, but it sounds like a place I'd start.
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from sunshinemrs. Show sunshinemrs's posts

    Re: Separation Anxiety/Howling

    I would certainly check with the shelter she got the dog from.  I'm sure this is not the first rescue dog to experience separation anxiety and I bet they have some good tips in helping curb the behavior.
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Separation Anxiety/Howling

    Gosh, that's too bad, easy.

    Does she use a crate?  Of course, she can't solve the problem by putting the dog in a crate and leaving, but if introduced correctly over time it becomes a special, calming den even for adult dogs who have never had one before.  Maybe then, in its crate, it would feel comfortable when she's away. 
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from pinkkittie27. Show pinkkittie27's posts

    Re: Separation Anxiety/Howling

    I've heard that you can try and train it away by leaving for short periods of time, waiting outside, and coming back in and praising the dog if it didn't bark/howl.
    Other methods include giving the dog a "distraction" right before you leave. a special treat like a kong with peanut butter or treat ball that the dog only gets right before you leave. The dog will start to realize that good things happen when you leave.
    We had a treat ball for Max that allowed you to record sound onto it. when he rolled it, he heard me saying "good boy!". that helped keep him occupied when we'd leave him alone as a puppy.

    if you decide to do a crate with a dog who has separation anxiety, you must also put the dog in the crate when you are at home occasionally. if you don't, the dog beguns to associate the crate with you leaving, and will hate it. so, put the dog it when you cook dinner, or when you go to bed as well as when you leave.
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from easydoesit2. Show easydoesit2's posts

    Re: Separation Anxiety/Howling

    Good ideas!  My own dog has always willingly entered her crate when she seems to be feeling anxious or "threatened".  And the shelter told us that the way they got the dog was that he was seized by the police when his owner was sent to prison: poor animal had his only previous owner "vanish"! Talk about separation!  They should be sensitive to this dog's situation.
     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Separation Anxiety/Howling

    Yes, Gracie is dealing with paw issues right now, and if she sees me coming with the bag balm she runs in her crate, her safe zone, and curls up in the back. But, she's had it her special place since she came home with us at 8 weeks old.  She's almost 9 months, now.

    I think your MIL will have to spend a considerable amount of time and training to get her dog to take to a crate as an adult dog.  Introduced too quickly or poorly and then it will be crate shy as well as anxious.

    That poor dog.  Your MIL is a dear to take it in.  I don't envy her, but I think with time, proper/slow crate training, and plain ol' love, it will work out.
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Separation Anxiety/Howling

    easy, that's GREAT!!!

    Sorry, I missed this news 'til today.  Hope it's still working like a charm.  And, the house ought to smell nice, too. :)
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from pinkkittie27. Show pinkkittie27's posts

    Re: Separation Anxiety/Howling

    good points CTDC. my mom has her dog (who is extremely excitable and hyper) in a crate when she's not at home. when she returns, the dog is not let out of the crate until it is calm. as long as the dog is calm, it receives attention/praise. if it gets excited, the attention/praise stops. it's worked wonders, and now the dog is much calmer when she returns home.
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from pinkkittie27. Show pinkkittie27's posts

    Re: Separation Anxiety/Howling

    a squirt bottle full of water is another method of correction that carries no risk of inflicting pain, in case you don't know if the dog was abused and might lash out if it perceives violence.
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from easydoesit2. Show easydoesit2's posts

    Re: Separation Anxiety/Howling

    I now have a 6 page detailed behavior survey questionnaire to complete and return.  I'll have to work with MIL on it. I can answer some of the questions, but she lives with him, not me.  Lately, MIL hasn't been going out too much, and is rarely gone for long (she is 87), so Jake hasn't been alone or howling, and we have some time to work on this. I'll have her start on some of the suggestions here.  That way, we can tell the Behaviorist Jake's reaction to them and maybe narrow things down a bit. 
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from easydoesit2. Show easydoesit2's posts

    Re: Separation Anxiety/Howling

    MIL doesn't like the idea of crating, and going in and out especially in winter,   and some of the other ideas sounded like too much work for her.  (She is 87!) I consulted an animal trainer.  She suggested a "spray collar".  The sound of a bark or howl causes the collar to emit a very strong citrus smell.  She says dogs hate the smell of citrus and this is a very strong scent.  The theory is that Jake will quickly learn that silence avoids the smell.  He is normally a very quiet animal, so MIL can even leave the collar on so he doesn't learn to associate putting the collar on with the fact that she must be planning to leave him.  We'll see.  
     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from easydoesit2. Show easydoesit2's posts

    Re: Separation Anxiety/Howling

    Thanks, Kar.  I'm sure that something will work.  MIL had a dog before Jake that was the most hateful mean spirited little creature you would ever want to meet. No one in the family liked that dog, but MIL was crazy about him and was very upset when he had to be put down.  Jake is a really good dog so he's worth the effort.  I had to laugh about Gracie being under your feet when you were cooking.  My poodle, Nowelle, sticks to my wife like glue when she cooks.  I have seen Nowelle scoop up some strange things- a slice of pepperoni, raw potato, partially cooked hot pasta- that the bride drops, though they otherwise have little use for each other.  And my wife's frequent orders of, "GET OUT FROM UNDER MY FEET!" have no effect.
     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from pinkkittie27. Show pinkkittie27's posts

    Re: Separation Anxiety/Howling

    lavendar and chamomile are naturally comforting herbs. you can spray that scent in a crate or on a bed. they also sell pheramone sprays that are comforting to dogs.
     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from CT-DC. Show CT-DC's posts

    Re: Separation Anxiety/Howling

    Also, when your MIL returns to the house, she MUST ignore the dog when she gets home.  Just walk in, take off coat, and move about the house and ignore the dog until the dog is calm.  This makes it be 'no big deal' when she leaves, but also when she returns.  We often lavish hugs and kisses and attention on our dogs when we return, giving too much emphasis on the returning, which for a sep. anxiety dog is even worse. 

    So, no touch, no talk, no eye contact when she returns (yes, that's Cesar's saying!) until the dog is in a calm state. Then she can pet the dog, but NOT when it's bouncing around, jumping on her, and being so HAPPY to see her!

    Honestly, I think she should work with a good behaviorist dog specialist who can coach and work on her based on the specific dog's needs, because this is a tough one given it happens when she isn't there.  Therefore, it's harder to correct - you can give correction when a dog jumps up on you, but correcting a dog for barking when you aren't there... much harder.

    Although I would say that you could SLOWWWWLLLY introduce the crate - again, though, when she opens the door to let the dog out of the crate, it's just open the door and walk away, not lavishing love on the dog when she lets it out, because then the focus is on getting OUT.  Eventually you will pet the dog, but not when it first comes out.

    Now, when it's in the crate giving it kibble for being "good" is fine, but not when it gets out.

    Perhaps she could read Cesar's (The Dog Whisperer) book to give her ideas?  Or another dog training book if she isn't a Cesar fan?
     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from easydoesit2. Show easydoesit2's posts

    Re: Separation Anxiety/Howling

    SUCCESS!!!  MIL can now come and go as she pleases. It seems Jake would rather suffer in silence than smell that collar.  Thanks everyone for your help and suggestions.

     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Separation Anxiety/Howling

    easy, while you were posting, I was asking for an update in my crates thread!

    Gosh, that's too bad people have the wrong/outdated idea about crates being cruel.  I had to insist on getting a crate myself because DH was also under the impression it was cruel.  You can see how he feels about it, now...

    Anyway, I hope that works, but I have to add that Gracie doesn't seem to mind the smell of citrus that much.  I make hummus and was juicing lemons for it yesterday, and she was sniffing away just as if I had meat up there.  Maybe she was just curious, but when I wanted her out of there, I let her lick my fingers, and she didn't even run away then.  I thought she'd head straight for her water and then somewhere other than under my feet.  Nope.  But, maybe the concentrated smell would be more unpleasant and work.

    Thanks for letting us know.  I think of her and her rescued dog often.

    ~kar

    P.S.  Has she thought about finding it a new home?  I know she must be attached, but it sounds like she might have bitten off more than she can chew with this particular dog.  Am I a monster?  Sigh.  Anyway, I would think she'd be much happier with a dog that doesn't have emotional problems, a nice "easy" lap dog, and this dog would be happier with someone better equipped to handle its issues.
     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Separation Anxiety/Howling

    I hope we gave you good advice, easy.  You are a thoughtful person to go through all this with her.  Thanks for the update and please remember we care to hear how it goes.
     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Separation Anxiety/Howling

    LOL, easy!  It was cute when she would literally fall asleep on my feet at 8 weeks old and 15 lbs while I was chopping veggies or whatever.  Now, her nose reaches the edge of the counter and her constant sniffing and stepping on me...not so much!

    I'm glad you expect a positive outcome.  You are a realist as far as I can surmise online so that gives me hope. :)
     
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