Sleeping ShihTzu

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from kat yubs. Show kat yubs's posts

    Sleeping ShihTzu

    My shih tzu is 6 years young and all he does is sleep.  I had him checked out at the vet and nothing is wrong.  He is perfectly healthy.  Does anyone have a shih tzu that does this?
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from dog-lady. Show dog-lady's posts

    Re: Sleeping ShihTzu

      Low thyroid levels hypothyroidism can cause this [more common in spayed females],  Is he left alone for long periods of time?

     Sometimes they get in the habit of sleeping till you return.

     Dogs do sleep a lot,  especially as they get older,  6 is not old, but he is mature.

     Does he have other dogs to play with?  Maybe going to a dog park or play dates with a neighbors dog would help,  even just going for a ride with you while you run errands.

     More walks, even brief ones around the neighborhood to stimulate him.  New toys?  Good luck.

         PS:  How about doggy day care once or twice a week?  Just so he can socialize with other dogs,  might perk him up a little!  

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from ambergirl. Show ambergirl's posts

    Re: Sleeping ShihTzu

    I have a Shih Tzu and she does sleep when I am gone.  She is much older now than your dog, going on 14, but I find she def sleeps more, even when I am home.  I always regretted not getting another dog to keep her company. I have 2 cats, but not quite the same.  Would you be able to give him a roommate?  I know 2 dogs is not for everyone.  But if your vet said your dog is fine, then I wouldn't worry so much.  A puppy is full of energy, but they slow down when they are "dogs"

    ETA: My dog has never given "kisses" and she doesn't bark unless someone is at the door.  I thought there was something wrong with her.  Every dog acts different : )
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Sleeping ShihTzu

    Yes, as dog-lady said, dogs of all breeds sleep for more than just being tired.  If the vet ruled out medical problems (did they check the thyroid?), he might just be bored.  Dogs who are left alone a lot sleep to pass the time. And, even though they might snore and dream (like ours does), they don't ever really sleep as soundly as humans can; they always have "one ear" on for predators.  So, they can nap a lot and still sleep at night, too.  However, sleeping all day is not the healthiest thing - they need exercise and playful attention.

    ETA:  Ambergirl, didn't see your post until mine posted, but glad you saw this, too, since you have Amber.  Gracie, a rambunctious Lab, also sleeps when we're not around.  When she was a puppy she'd have occupied herself by tearing up whatever she could find and throwing around the pieces like confetti, but thankfully those days are long behind us.  We don't even crate her when we leave the house anymore...but she sleeps, anyway, usually in her crate with the door wide open.
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from ambergirl. Show ambergirl's posts

    Re: Sleeping ShihTzu

    Amber did some damage when she was a puppy too Kar.  I couldn't wait for her to outgrow it and now that she did, I wouldn't mind seeing the puppy again : )  Like us, they slow down and 6 is young but still 42 years old in human years.  Amber will be 78 in Human years.  Wow huh?

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from kat yubs. Show kat yubs's posts

    Re: Sleeping ShihTzu

    Thank you for your thoughts.

    He does get exercise.....he is walked regularly and he is not home alone too often.  Someone is usually home with him but still he wants to sleep.  When he does engage in play it is not for more than 5 minutes.   When we leave the house and come home he does not greet us as he use to.
     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from dog-lady. Show dog-lady's posts

    Re: Sleeping ShihTzu

    That's what happened with my female,  she would act like she was in a coma.

     Did the vet do lab work to rule out a medical cause?

      If there is no medical cause , he may be bored, lonely or depressed, talk to your vet about medication, they actually prescribe a low dose of antidepressants sometimes, not expensive and you may see a significant difference.

      

     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Sleeping ShihTzu

    If this is a dramatic change in behavior, I'd press the vet to find out what is the matter; it's clearly not "nothing."
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from ambergirl. Show ambergirl's posts

    Re: Sleeping ShihTzu

    I agree to go back to the vet.  The behavior has changed which is the difference.  If your vet is not willing to run tests, get a second opinion. 
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from dog-lady. Show dog-lady's posts

    Re: Sleeping ShihTzu

    Dogs are pack animals, so I would try the doggy day care or dog park option first and see if he perks up.   He may simply be lonely for  canine companionship.

      BTW: Being on medication is not a bad thing,  if that's what he needs to get over the hump and enjoy life,  so be it.

     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Sleeping ShihTzu

    I agree - nothing wrong with that type of medication, but those meds for a non-depressed/anxious dog would do more harm than good so everything other than that has to be ruled out first, and that can prove difficult for a creature who can't talk.
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from dog-lady. Show dog-lady's posts

    Re: Sleeping ShihTzu

    Exactly, that's why I stressed ruling out medical causes for his symptoms first,  but it sounds like the poster has already done that, so if that's the case it may be a good time for the poster to discuss other treatment options that are available.  

    If an animal is suffering from depression it doesn't mean anyone did anything wrong or that he was mistreated in anyway,  sometimes it is simply a chemical imbalance that can be treated with medication.

     I know there is a stigma regarding humans getting treatment,  does this apply to pets to? 

     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Sleeping ShihTzu

    I hope not.

    ETA:  It does sound like they got at least some tests, but there are some that are more expensive (titers) than others, and possibly they didn't opt for those.  I'd get everything ruled out, and I understand you are saying the same thing.
     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from dog-lady. Show dog-lady's posts

    Re: Sleeping ShihTzu

    A vet has a trained eye and can determine what tests need to be done or not ...  just by examining the animal.

     Lab work is expensive.

      They are doctors,  they go to school for 8+ years and then continue to receive training and education to be better able to serve you.

       PS: No I'm not saying the same thing as the above poster,  I don't think the vet would recommend testing the dog for everything under the sun for a minor problem.

     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Sleeping ShihTzu

    Yeah, maybe what has been done already really is enough to rule out everything medical that could cause excessive sleepiness...  I'm sensitive to starting depression meds without knowing for sure, though, because I've taken them and if dogs are anything like people they can really make you sick even if you do need them.  Maybe dogs don't generally react that way...I really don't know.
     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from dog-lady. Show dog-lady's posts

    Re: Sleeping ShihTzu

    Sleep disturbance [either too much or too little] is the #1 symptom of clinical depression.

      For people anyway,  I can only assume it may be the same for dogs.

       PS:  At the age of 6 he should have a little more pep,  if he was over 10 ... well then you might see a gradual decline.

     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Sleeping ShihTzu

    Yeah, I wanted to sleep 24/7.   I don't have any personal experience with a dog that needed that kind of support (that I know of), though, so I'm at a loss here.
     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from dog-lady. Show dog-lady's posts

    Re: Sleeping ShihTzu

    I did have a small dog on a low dose of Clomicalm [Anafranil] due to separation anxiety and thunderstorm phobia,  she had trouble adjusting to a move we made, and her symptoms presented as an agitated depression.

     She was on the medication for about 6 months and then tapered off of it with excellent results and remained calm.

     It took about 2 weeks to see a subtle difference in her behavior,  but the real test was the 4th of July celebration complete with loud contiuous firecrackers ... she napped right through it!

     That's when I realized the medication was effective and the dog was comfortable.

      

     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Sleeping ShihTzu

    That's really cool.  It takes 2 - 4 weeks in humans to feel a difference, too.  The side effects in that time can be awful (they were for me), but when it "kicked in" and started working for the depression the nasty side effects went totally away.  So, sticking with it despite less than pleasant results at first was crucial.
     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from dog-lady. Show dog-lady's posts

    Re: Sleeping ShihTzu

    Canine Depression - 10 Common Signs and 10 Simple Suggestions to Help Your Dog



     
    Expert Author Karen Soukiasian

    Yes! Absolutely! Dogs can get depressed. There are a number of sources that can ebb the life out of your canine buddy.

    1. Loneliness...you may be too busy, or they may have lost a dear human or animal friend. 
    2. Sudden changes in routines and schedules. 
    3. More than usual tension in the home. Your dog may be sensing YOUR mood changes. 
    4. Illness, yours or theirs. 
    5. Ageing. They can no longer physically do, what they were once capable of doing. 
    6. Dietary problems (wrong food).

    10 Common Signs of Canine Depression

    1. Weight loss/Lack of thirst 
    2. Regression in house training...soiling inside 
    3. Lack of sociability 
    4. Lack of enthusiasm and motivation 
    5. Anxious 
    6. Impulsive aggression 
    7. Phobic 
    8. Nervous 
    9. Grief 
    10. Chemical imbalance

    10 Simple Suggestions to Pump That Zest for Life, Back Into Your Dog

    1. Have your veterinarian determine if there is a physical or chemical problem causing your dog's mood change.

    2. Talk to your veterinarian about your dog's diet. A simple change of diet may help.

    3. Talk to your dog! Don't worry, no one is looking. Many owners rarely talk to their dogs...other than to scold them. Your dog loves the sound of your voice...be up beat. Praise them as many times a day as possible. They can never hear it enough.

    4. As much as possible, stay on a scheduled routine. It offers your dog a sense of security.

    5. If your dog has lost a human or animal friend, socialize them. Take them where they can interact with other dogs, preferably daily. Dogs need dogs.

    6. Enroll in a positive reinforcement, punishment-free obedience dog training class. You will benefit by toning up your leadership skills, and your dog will benefit from the socialization with new people and dogs, not to mention the added bonus of spending quality time with his or her best friend, YOU! Make the commitment, you will both enjoy it...and it works!

    7. Have an adventure with your dog...do something fun, and different. Challenge them...build up their self-esteem. Keep it short and keep it fun. Keep them interested, so they will be open for new challenges.

    8. Walk him or her in a different neighborhood. Vary the pace of your walk. Make it interesting. The change may spark focus back into your friend.

    9. Take your dog with you when possible. Include him or her in your activities outside the home. Take them to work with you if possible. Take them with you when you visit friends or run errands. Make it fun!

    10. If the time is right for you, consider getting him or her a canine companion. Let your dog pick out their new friend! If you are not ready to assume the responsibilities of another dog...don't do it!

    The most important thing you can do to help your dog over this bump in the road...let them know how much you love them. They need to see it in your eyes, hear it in your voice, and feel it through your actions. Their lives are too short. Being a dog should be fun. It doesn't take much to make them happy!

    Karen A. Soukiasian, GOOD DOG! - DOG TRAINING - Owner/Trainer, St. Augustine, Florida - AKC CANINE GOOD CITIZEN Evaluatorhttp://www.freewebs.com/gooddogsite

    Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Karen_Soukiasian


     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from bethanyrosevear. Show bethanyrosevear's posts

    Re: Sleeping ShihTzu

    My Shih Tzu Bella tends to sleep when she wants too.  Unfortunatly it does not usually coinside when I want to sleep.  Bella is home alone 2 days a week and we noticed very fast that when we get home those days, she is about as hyper as a dog can get and has no intention of sleeping that night.  This would all be ok except that she wants to spend our sleeping time playing!  Jumping on our head, licking our face, no sleep to be had for us!  We soon figured out that she is sleeping all day while we are not there and the vet told us that it was typical because she is bored. 
     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Sleeping ShihTzu

    What if you take her for a long walk right after you get home those two nights?  Of course, it's getting dark early, now, but with reflective clothing and/or flashing LEDs (for joggers) you could walk her safely at any time.  Or, is there some way you could have someone come in and have her go for a long walk in the middle of the day?  She's got to use energy during the day to be remotely tired at night, of course.

    In addition to exercising her, you could try crating her on those nights with soft toys or something else to sooth her.  She'd fuss at first, but would get used to it w/in a couple of weeks imo, and her fussing wouldn't keep you any more awake than her physical presence does in your face right now.  If you go this route, I'd recommend crating her at night every night, not just on the 2 nights it's a problem - she might never accept it, otherwise.

    GL!

     There's not much you can do other than that if you must leave her alone all day.  She's going to sleep all day if left to her own devices.
     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from bethanyrosevear. Show bethanyrosevear's posts

    Re: Sleeping ShihTzu

    Thanks for the advise.  It is appreciated as always.  We decided before we even bought her that we would not be using crate training.  I know that some people prefer it and that is fine, but we never wanted tot put her in a cage.  We do spend most of the time after work playing with her and running around, it just doesn't always work.  You can certainly tell who rules the roost at our house! Laughing
     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Sleeping ShihTzu

    Well, besides exercise and crating I'm at a loss as to what you could do to solve the problem...maybe someone else can help. :)
     

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