1. You have chosen to ignore posts from BDCKristi. Show BDCKristi's posts

    Your thoughts on dog bites

    According to this story, about 4.7 million people are bitten by dogs each year and $479 million in dog bite claims were paid by all insurance companies in 2011.

    What are your thoughts on this?

    http://www.boston.com/community/pets/articles/2012/05/17/leading_insurer_pays_109m_for_dog_bite_claims/
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from dog-lady. Show dog-lady's posts

    Re: Your thoughts on dog bites

    Dogs bite, they always have and they always will. It is the responsibility of the pet owner to protect others from being harmed by the dog.  Accidents happen, it is still up to the owner to financially take care of any harm or damage the dog causes via insurance or whatever.  I discourage strangers from handling my pets and I warn children approaching not to touch, if a parent is there I allow the child to extend a hand, let the dog sniff and say hello. I have been on antibiotics twice for dog bites from my own 15 pound dog!   When you are treated for a dog bite the dr has to report it to Animal Control.  If I owned an aggressive breed I would probably put a muzzle on him when around others. That's why homeowners insurance will ask what breed your dogs are, and some won't insure you.  It helps to have a high fence with a locked gate and a "Beware of Dog" sign on your property, no matter what breed or size your dogs are.  It shows you have at least warned people of the possible danger.
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Your thoughts on dog bites

    The burden is definitely on the dog owners to prevent bites by muzzle, isolation, or other method to keep their dog's teeth off kids or anyone else.  

    However, one thing I've noticed that helps, too, is how parents are teaching their kids to politely ask me if they may pet Gracie before approaching her.  I thank the child for asking and tell them it's OK then thank the parents for raising their kids with good manners and good sense.
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from Maldenlady. Show Maldenlady's posts

    Re: Your thoughts on dog bites

    All the above are excellent points. 

    The only thing I'd add, is that sometimes dogs bite when they're just plain scared/freaked out.  Remember that story of the hero dog, who saved the owner?  A news anchor heard the story, and brought the dog into the studio.  Lots of lights, lots of strangers right near the dog -- and the dog bit the anchor during the interview.  Major lesson here:  if you're taking a dog into an unfamiliar environment,  do so with a little caution -- let the first exposure be calm.  You want a confident dog.  I think a lot of dog-owning viewers who saw the video of the incident could understand where the dog was coming from, and (rightly, I think) held the news anchor at least partly responsible.  As a matter of fact, I think she did an editorial on the incident when she got back to work, accepting some responsibility for it.  A dog has its teeth and claws to defend with...and, if the dog feels threatened, will use 'em...
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from dog-lady. Show dog-lady's posts

    Re: Your thoughts on dog bites

    I think parents should tell their children not to pet strange dogs... no matter what the owner tells you.  How would you like a stranger touching your head?  Take the kids to a petting zoo instead.  www.winslowfarm.com
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from DirtyWaterLover. Show DirtyWaterLover's posts

    Re: Your thoughts on dog bites

    I saw a lady plop her toddler daughter in front of a strange dog.  I was horrified.

    While I agree that parents shouldn't let their children approach strange dogs, it's ultimately the dog owners responsibility to protect their dogs.  If a dog bites a kid for whatever reason, the owner runs the risk of being sued and having their dog put down.

    People have to know their dogs and be aware of what's going on.  When I'm waking my dog and I see over stimulated children coming my way, I'll position myself to be between the child and my dog.

    I don't let children pet my dog.  I'll give them dog treats to give to my dog so that my dog associates children with getting treats.

    Adults have a tendency to hover over dogs, which the dog sees as the person trying to dominate the dog.  A person bending over to pet a smaller dog on the head is very threatening to a dog.  Sure, a dog may take it for a while, but it could blow at any time.

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from dog-lady. Show dog-lady's posts

    Re: Your thoughts on dog bites

    @DWL, I agree except for the offering of dog treats, my dogs instinctively will not accept food from strangers and I think that's a good thing.  So I discourage people from shoving food in their faces.   Plus they all have specific diets.  Thanks but no thanks!    http://voices.yahoo.com/poison-training-dog-589521.html
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from pinkkittie27. Show pinkkittie27's posts

    Re: Your thoughts on dog bites

    I agree with Kar that asking *before* petting or approaching is crucial. It always baffles me when people start to lean down or get really close to a dog *while* they're asking if it's okay. If that dog's got issues, you're going to get the answer too late.
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Your thoughts on dog bites

    Hey, pinkkittie - hope you and Max are well.  Yes, that's exactly what I meant and have been experiencing, thankfully.  People are nutty.  I suppose it goes to show that those kids who reach out to pet the dog as they are asking if it's OK always get what they ask for so there's no instilled need to wait for and respect the answer.
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from pinkkittie27. Show pinkkittie27's posts

    Re: Your thoughts on dog bites

    In Response to Re: Your thoughts on dog bites:
    [QUOTE]Hey, pinkkittie - hope you and Max are well.  Yes, that's exactly what I meant and have been experiencing, thankfully.  People are nutty.  I suppose it goes to show that those kids who reach out to pet the dog as they are asking if it's OK  always get what they ask for so there's no instilled need to wait for and respect the answer.
    Posted by kargiver[/QUOTE]

    I know, on one hand I'm happy they've never been bit, but part of me knows one day they'll get a rude awakening. It's scary to have a dog snap at you, whether you're 6 or 60.
     

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