1. You have chosen to ignore posts from GoneToTheDogs39. Show GoneToTheDogs39's posts

    Re: Isn't Age Discrimination Against the Law?

    Yes it is, but it's very difficult to prove. 
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from Amethyst2. Show Amethyst2's posts

    Re: Isn't Age Discrimination Against the Law?

    I know a lot of 50-somethings who have been out of work for a long time...yeah, the economy's a mess, and jobs aren't that plentiful, but ya can't tell me there isn't age discrimination going on!  Many of the people I know who have been laid off, and have been unemployed for a while, are going the self-employment route...I also know a few people who have given up altogether, but they have life partners who are working.  Of course, they're scaling back big time, and they're doing things like yard sales, taking care of people's dogs while they're away, things like that...of course, their age plays a role in their employability!  These are good people, hard workers who have made a point of doing it right by keeping up with their skills, etc...but Robin's right.  Legally, it's hard to prove.  If I say "you didn't hire me because of my age", it's very easy for the interviewer to come back with *something, anything" to counteract that. 
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from Jim-in-Littleton. Show Jim-in-Littleton's posts

    Re: Isn't Age Discrimination Against the Law?

    "Maybe new efforts by the government to encourage businesses, hospitals and institutions to fill a certain quota of the new hirees with people over 50 is now in order. Maybe a tax perk or two and some serious monitoring might help in motivating them to reconsider the older worker."

    You've jumped from age discrimination being illegal (which it is...) to a form of affirmative action here.

    Making something illegal and mandating steps to reverse it are two very different things.  I don't think you can make the case that discrimination against those over 40 (which is the age-line drawn in Federal law) is that pervasive or that it has historically blocked future generations from employment, etc... which has been the standard used to justify affirmative action programs in the past.

    The biggest obstacle I faced ws getting HR people to understand that I was willing to take a job that paid less than what I had been making.  They always seemed to have a mindset that everyone's goal was to climb the corporate ladder.  They'd look at my resume and just assume that I wanted a job that was at a higher level (and salary of course...) than what I'd had previously.
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from Maldenlady. Show Maldenlady's posts

    Re: Isn't Age Discrimination Against the Law?

    Great post, Jim-in-Littleton...

    This is why one of my pet peeves is the code term "overqualified"!

    There was a time when I was working full-time, but still needed to earn more money.  So I applied for some part-time, evening work.  In my case, that meant lower-level retail work...I was asked why I wanted to work at that kind of job, when i also had full time work...The truth?  My full-time job was pretty low pay, and I had just come out of a period of unemployment, which meant I had to do some living off my credit cards, and I wanted to get them paid off.  And honestly, I thought it would be fun (which it was...I got the job, but the suspicion at the interview was a surprise!  Oh -- I was over 40 at the time...so no, this wasn't really about job discrimination, but it just underscores Jim's point about age, and in some cases willlingness to take a lower-level job...
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from ALF72. Show ALF72's posts

    Re: Isn't Age Discrimination Against the Law?

    Employers do not want to hire overqualified people because they are afraid they are going to jump ship once the economy improves.  Interviewing and hiring is a PITA and hiring managers don't want to do it more often than they have to.  So if they have a choice of hiring a qualified person w/ potential to grow w/ that company for several years as opposed to someone who is overqualified but can't find a 'better' or more desirable job for their qualifications b/c of the economy and who is willing to 'slum it' b/c they have been out of work for a while, they are more likely to hire the former over the latter simply b/c they seem like less of a flight risk.  It generally means that older workers are passed over.  But age discrimination [not hiring someone BECAUSE they are old] and selecting a younger worker over and older worker for other, legitimate reasons are 2 very different things.  Your situation seems to indicate "I didn't get the job, but Sally did and I just so happen to be older than Sally".  You need a situation where you were not hired because of your age to have any sort of valid age discrimination case. It does not sound like you have that.  And these cases are very hard to prove and win.
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from Maldenlady. Show Maldenlady's posts

    Re: Isn't Age Discrimination Against the Law?

    Hey, Alf!

    So, you've got me thinking...for someone who is "overqualified", would it make sense to try to allay the fears of potential employer, by offering to sign something promising to stay on for (insert length of time here)?  In one of my former jobs, I was asked to do that.  I promised 2 years, and was there about 6!  Ya never know.  The person you think may be overqualified may end up really enjoying it, and wanting to stay...

    But on the point about age discrimination.  I think probably some interviewer would have to pretty much outwardly say something like:  "we're only considering people under the age of (whatever) for this position..." and what employer's gong to do that!!  However, I'm petite, and I was once outwardly asked how tall I am during an interview! 

     
     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from ALF72. Show ALF72's posts

    Re: Isn't Age Discrimination Against the Law?

    Offering to sign something may be overkill.  I would recommend mentioning in an interview that you are very excited about the prospect of working for that company and finding a way to convey that you think it's a great fit and why you want to work there. Something that convinces the company why they should choose you.  You could also ask them if there are any questions or concerns they have regarding your candidacy and what you can do to answer those questions or allay their fears.  GL!
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from GoneToTheDogs39. Show GoneToTheDogs39's posts

    Re: Isn't Age Discrimination Against the Law?

    They are never going to admit that your age is the reason you did not get the job.   Just to get an interview they advise people to limit their experience only to the last 10 years,  keep it simple, ie: 1 page resume,  and do not put down the year you graduated high school or college.  Maybe Alf has some better ideas,  I just wanted to share.   PS:  I think signing anything to say you will stay a certain length of time would not be legally binding.    A woman I knew,  went on about 20 interviews with no call backs,  she was  well groomed, 50ish, with short grey hair,  she had her hair dyed a youthful golden brown and was hired after the next interview she went on.
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from ALF72. Show ALF72's posts

    Re: Isn't Age Discrimination Against the Law?

    If you are in your 50s, limiting your experience to the last 10 years is going to be a major red flag to an employer.  What were you doing for the other 20? Were you in jail?  Seriously, you need to include all relevant information on your resume. Leaving out information is fraudulent.  You don't need to include the gig at Burger King you had while in college, but you do need to include all information that is relevant to the position, even if you need to go back 15 or 20 years.  If you were w/ a company for 15 years, include that information. Number 1, it shows you have staying power. Also, if you held an upper or mid level position for the last 10 years, but you leave out all other information before that, they are going to wonder how and where you got the experience to hold that job and why you are leaving it out. Gaps or questions on a resume are going to hurt you more than experience is. 
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from Maldenlady. Show Maldenlady's posts

    Re: Isn't Age Discrimination Against the Law?

    Ugh!  So here's a problem -- several of my former workplaces no longer exist, and I've got no way of contacting people who worked there...as a matter of fact, several have passed away. 

    I should clarify -- I'm not really looking.  I've got a fair enough job right now, been here for about 9 years.  It's OK, not great, but it's a job in a bad economy, and again, being 50+, with problems getting former references just seem like a pretty insurmountable obstacles...I'm thinking self-employment might be my only hope if I ever (heaven forbid) end up in a situation where I need to look...It's ironic, because I've been a good emplyee, with a lot of longevity at former positions.  But bosses have passed away; supervisors have disappeared off the face of the earth.  Lesson learned:  if a supervisor/boss/coworker let you know they're leaving and you want them to be a reference for you, for heaven sake ask them to write a letter for you before they leave, and guard it with your life!

    At this poiint, again if I were looking, the best I could do would be to show 9 very complimentary annual reviews, and hope that would be OK. 

    One thing I think about:  My current position is a solo practitioner medical  pracitce.  i shudder to think what would happen should he tell me one day that he's going to retire fairly soon!  I've got a 401K, but if I'm going to be around for another 30 years, it ain't nearly enough! 

    Dear Congress:  Please don't mess with my social security and medicare!!  Pretty please!!
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from GoneToTheDogs39. Show GoneToTheDogs39's posts

    Re: Isn't Age Discrimination Against the Law?

    When a friend of mine went on an interview recently and asked for extra paper to include all of her experience on the application,  she was told they were only interested in the last 10 years of her employment.  You can tell them about all your experience verbally if and when you are granted an interview.   Have you been out there lately?   BTW: Everything is online now, they won't even accept a paper resume,  most of the time it will get filed in the trash.  You need 3 recent references that can be reached by phone or e-mail, old ones don't count. Do what you can to give off a youthful appearance including cosmetic surgery if you can afford it,  that goes for men too!.
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from ALF72. Show ALF72's posts

    Re: Isn't Age Discrimination Against the Law?

    Yes, honey, I've been out there. I just landed a job last year.  I put all my experience on there {I'm 39}. I was required to, per the posting and per my licensing requirements.  I also currently do employment law [employer side] for a living so I kind of have a sense regarding what employers are looking for.  If you leave out relevant information, there are going to be questions about it. 

    I'm sure some fields [such as IT] are only interested in the last 10 years of experience, but other fields [law, medicine, management] are interested in the whole kit and kaboodle b/c it is relevant.  If you are filling out an application by hand [ie, for Target or other box store], you really don't need more information than fits on the sheet. But if you are applying to something that requires a resume or any kind of advanced educational background or training, then you should include pretty much everything. 
     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from pinkkittie27. Show pinkkittie27's posts

    Re: Isn't Age Discrimination Against the Law?

    Just wanted to mention the other reason employers favor the young- they're cheaper! They don't get sick as often (allegedly), and they don't as much for pay because they're just starting out. I would get paid a lot more for my job if I had more experience.
    As Jim-In-Littleton points out, you may have to outright say that you don't expect to make what your former salary was.
     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from laryan. Show laryan's posts

    Re: Isn't Age Discrimination Against the Law?

    Yes, age discrimination is against the law, and yes its difficult to prove.  i am over 50, and have a wealth of experience in a wide array of industries.  I've experienced "ageism" firsthand.

    I've also seen a wealth of employers who only want the past 10 years, or most recent 3 employers.

    I've also seen younger friends with newborn or school aged children who are also discriminated against...because a potential employer is afraid they are going to have to leave work early because one of their children get sick in either daycare or school... 
     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from dog-lady. Show dog-lady's posts

    Re: Isn't Age Discrimination Against the Law?

    http://newoldage.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/01/12/age-discrimination-takes-its-toll/?pagemode=print
     
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