1. You have chosen to ignore posts from woobiewoo. Show woobiewoo's posts

    Re: strange advice on resume words and format

    what was the word???
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from tjmello. Show tjmello's posts

    Re: strange advice on resume words and format

    In Response to strange advice on resume words and format:
    [QUOTE]A "professional" once advised not to use a certain word in a resume and not to put the job experience dates on the right side of the page. However, a written resume guide I had received (enclosed with resume paper I bought) indicated that the word the professional had kibitzed about was one of the acceptable "action" words to use. Also, I have found many examples of people using resumes with the job experience dates on the right side of the page. It is frustrating to get this kind of "advice" from a person who has a good "professional" job, while I can only find a job at half my former income, doing "non-professional" work. Does every job hunt-advisor type of professional want to be a resume creator/advisor type of professional, no matter what their skills or training are? Or is it just that one person whom I happened to consult, as she provided a government sponsored, free service?
    Posted by Sara999999[/QUOTE]

    Even professionals have different opinions and advice to offer. There is no "one" resume style/format that is preferred by employers. As a professional career counselor, I've had some employers tell me they like a particular resume style, and others tell me they hate the same style. Some employers liked certain wording, others disliked the same wording. The advisor may have had reasons for making those suggestions.
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from Sara999999. Show Sara999999's posts

    strange advice on resume words and format

    A "professional" once advised not to use a certain word in a resume and not to put the job experience dates on the right side of the page. However, a written resume guide I had received (enclosed with resume paper I bought) indicated that the word the professional had kibitzed about was one of the acceptable "action" words to use. Also, I have found many examples of people using resumes with the job experience dates on the right side of the page.

    It is frustrating to get this kind of "advice" from a person who has a good "professional" job, while I can only find a job at half my former income, doing "non-professional" work.

    Does every job hunt-advisor type of professional want to be a resume creator/advisor type of professional, no matter what their skills or training are? Or is it just that one person whom I happened to consult, as she provided a government sponsored, free service?
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from ALF72. Show ALF72's posts

    Re: strange advice on resume words and format

    There is a difference between a C.V. and a resume.  A C.V., which is required for most professional positions [law, medicine], always lists the years of experience to the right. Each field has it's own preference for the resume/C.V. set up - you wouldn't use the same resume format for a creative position that you would for something in accounting or law. 

    Each resume should be customized for the particular job to which you are applying.  In other words, your 'action words' in your prior job descriptions should be modified to fit what they are looking for in a candidate. 
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from pinkkittie27. Show pinkkittie27's posts

    Re: strange advice on resume words and format

    I have always included month/year dates in regards to each position held. I do so because I've never had a gap in my employment, and employers usually see that as a good sign. Most resumes I've seen have dates on them. I work in marketing, it may be different for other industries.
    If you've had a gap in your employment, it makes sense to leave the dates off.

    The only word I've been told to refrain from using is "use/used/uses" if another verb can be substituted. If it can't, then "use" and its variations is fine.

    I agree with tjmello that there's no one "right" way to write a resume. It varies by profession and personal preference.

    The rules I was taught are: be concise, keep it to one page, make the important information stand out, avoid blocks of text.
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from cosmogirl. Show cosmogirl's posts

    Re: strange advice on resume words and format

    IMO, putting the dates to the right of each job listing is pretty strange, doesn't serve a purpose, and you'll distract the recruiter.

    Don't understand why you didn't give the word you're questioning.  I personally hate any of the buzz words like metrics, paradigm, or synergy.  Also avoid pseudowords like conversate, reengineer, etc. 

    As kar said, every recruiter has his/her preferences.

    The most important thing is to make sure that your resume is 100% error-free.  Have at least 2 or 3 people proof it for you.  Good luck! 
     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from pinkkittie27. Show pinkkittie27's posts

    Re: strange advice on resume words and format

    In Response to Re: strange advice on resume words and format:
    [QUOTE]Finally, and there are mixed feelings about this, but I can't stand it when people write a personal goal or mission statement.
    Posted by Prill[/QUOTE]

    I agree. It's obvious by submitting your resume that your goal is to get the job. Your reasons for pursuing that particular position are best left for your cover letter or interview.

    If there is any technology or software relevent to your profession or the position, it's always good to list your level of proficiency with those on your resume. Example:
    Proficient in Avid Express, Avid Pro HD, and Final Cut Pro HD.
    Working knowledge of Pro Tools, and Adobe CS2.
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from pinkkittie27. Show pinkkittie27's posts

    Re: strange advice on resume words and format

    In Response to Re: strange advice on resume words and format:
    [QUOTE]IMO, putting the dates to the right of each job listing is pretty strange, doesn't serve a purpose, and you'll distract the recruiter. Don't understand why you didn't give the word you're questioning.  I personally hate any of the buzz words like metrics, paradigm, or synergy.  Also avoid pseudowords like conversate, reengineer, etc.  As kar said, every recruiter has his/her preferences. The most important thing is to make sure that your resume is 100% error-free.  Have at least 2 or 3 people proof it for you.  Good luck! 
    Posted by cosmogirl[/QUOTE]

    I agree that, when in doubt, it's always best to avoid jargon and buzz words. Abbreviations, too.
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: strange advice on resume words and format

    It should be a reflection of who you are.  If one word choice feels more like what you'd say, choose that one.  Guidance is just that, a guide, not a definitive list of allowable words.
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: strange advice on resume words and format

    I'm sorry you're struggling to find work and are frustrated.  I'm not sure I understand your question, but if you go to Monster.com and look under "Profile and Resume" (top left) you'll find excellent tips and guidance regarding resume writing.
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from Prill. Show Prill's posts

    Re: strange advice on resume words and format

    Always include the month and year where you worked (be it to the right or left of the company and position name).   From a hiring perspective if I see something like:
    2008 - 2009 - XYZ Company, Marketing Assistant
    2010 - ABC Company, Marketing Administrator

    Then I have no idea as to the stability of their employment history.  Did they only work from November 2008 - Jan 2009 at XYZ, and then not work again until Nov 2010?  Make it as clear as possible.  There can be 100s of resumes coming across a hiring managers desk for any given position, if it can't be skimmed quickly to get a snapshot of your skills and experience, then yours will go to the no pile.

    To echo what others said - ALWAYS get a second or third pair of eyes to look at it.

    Use the KISS principle (Keep It Simple Sweetheart). Clearly state the company name and your position title, along with (no more than 7-8) bullet points about what you did/achieved while there.

    Keep it professional, once you have been in the workforce for 2+ years, you don't need to write your interests (EG - Interests: Reading, Softball, my pet Cat Harry).... as a recruiter, I don't really care.  The exception would be if you are the Treasurer of your childs ice hockey club or something (as skills used in such positions may be transferable to the workplace).

    Don't write your reasons for leaving positions, that can be discussed at interview.

    Finally, and there are mixed feelings about this, but I can't stand it when people write a personal goal or mission statement.
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from Sara999999. Show Sara999999's posts

    Re: strange advice on resume words and format

    Thanks for all the advice. I am sorry that at this time I do not have a record of the "debatable" word.

    I did have three people look at my resume, and one did not seem impressed, maybe because my resume is not a "hard sell" type of resume, or exhibit of bragadocio (hope I spelled that right).

    I have several times received advice to do what I would call a "hard sell" in my resume, which makes me feel uncomfortable. If one is going to brag, shouldn't that be done more in the cover letter and interview than in a resume?

    Also, since I have mostly been in non-managerial positions, I feel that my accomplishments are harder to define and "hard sell." A manager may save a company money and/or make radical changes for the good. A non-manager may be more of a person who maintains the  basic functions at work. In that case, it is more difficult to do a "hard sell" type of resume, even though one may be making a valuable contribution at work.

    Does anyone have an opinion regarding doing bragging in a resume as opposed to the less hard sell use of action verbs? I am considering revising my resume to make it more of the "hard sell" type, so am interested in getting feedback on this issue.

     
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