LED lighting - the Q & A's

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from jazz568. Show jazz568's posts

    LED lighting - the Q & A's

    Saw a news about a survey result saying most Americans don't know how to conserve energy. Since LED is an emerging lighting technology, and probably the cleanest and greenest, I thought I open up this discussion and hope I can help to clarify some of the common questions about LED lights.  
    Some general info : 
    - LED lights contains no mercury, no lead, no UV or IR (for household lighting) 
    - LED is solid state lighting and usually can withstand shaking/moving without damage. 
    - LED can produce light that is close to the conventional incandescent light (2700 K).  (Different brands and models vary so ask questions before you buy.)
    - Energy saving: LED usually can save 70-90% of energy comparing to incandescent, and save 40-60% comparing to CFL. 
    - Cost: Indeed the initial cost is high comparing to other lamps. However, the total cost of ownership will actually be lower for a 3+ year comparison.  
    - recoup initial cost: If you replace a light that is lit for 6+ hours a day, in general you can recoup the initial cost in about 15-24 months depending the bulb you are replacing. 
    Let me stop here and I will be happy to answer questions, if i can.   

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from Jim-in-Littleton. Show Jim-in-Littleton's posts

    Re: LED lighting - the Q & A's

    No idea where you are getting your numbers from but they don't match up with my math. (I used the cost of bulbs based on advertised prices from the Lowe's WWW site and the cost of electricity is based on my electric Co.'s rate of $.082/Kwh)

    A standard 60-watt incandescent bulb costs about $.40 each.  To run it for 6 hours a day for a full year would cost me $10.77.  To run it constantly for 25,000 hours I'd burn up 25 of them (average life = 1,000 hours) so replacement costs plus electric costs would total $136.

    The equivelent CFL would use 13 watts and cost about $2.50 each.  Again, to run it for 6 hours/day every day for a full year would cost me $2.33/year.  I'd use 3 of the CFLs (average life = 8,000 hours) to reach that 25,000 hour point so replacement costs plus electric costs would total $34.15. 

    The equivelent LED bulb would use 12 watts and costs $39.98.  To run that bulb for 6 hours/day every day for a year would cost me $2.15/year. The LED bulb is rated for 25,000 so the total cost over this bulb's entire life would be $64.58.

    So the break even point here between the LED and the incandescent is right about at the 12,000 hour point.  That'd be 5.4 years at 6 hours/day useage. 

    The break even point between the LED and the CFL is somewhere in excess of the 100-year range.  Mercury is an issue with CFL's but you almost double your cost to rid yourself of that problem by going with an LED.

    Just my view, but until the LEDs drop significantly in initial cost the CFL is still your best bet.
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from jazz568. Show jazz568's posts

    Re: LED lighting - the Q & A's

    In Response to Re: LED lighting - the Q & A's:
    You are very lucky living in a place where electricity costs only 0.082/Kwh. Here in California we pay 0.12 for Kwh within the base range, and 0.15 for Kwh beyond the base range. Commercial lighting costs even more at 0.13 for low season and 0.16 to 0.17/Kwh for high season.  Anyway, if we beef up the energy rate to 0.14/Kwh in average, then the 2 year payback becomes feasible.  Granted that it will take much longer to recoup if one is replacing a CFL type of bulb.  I personally could not wait to get rid of the CFL due to the potential hazard to health (if broken in a home) and the long term damage to the environment (people are just dumping them in the garbage cans!).    The cost of LED also matters a lot. Currently it is very chaotic in the market with so many brands of products and price ranges. A typical LED PAR30 lamp can range from $29 to $85 and you don't really how they perform until you put it up in the fixture then turn it on.  For sure the price will come down. In Japan, the A19 bulb price came down from $89 to $19 within a 15 month time period. At $19 they are selling bulbs by the millions.  I think eventually it will drop down to about $12 or so for a 60w replacement. 


     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from EnjoyEverySandwich. Show EnjoyEverySandwich's posts

    Re: LED lighting - the Q & A's


    Another issue with CFLs, which can make LEDs worth the cost, is the quality of the light.  Now that incandescents are being phased out, the thought of living with flourescent light only is unpleasant for light-sensitive people like me.

    Also, LEDs can be dimmed, but that does increase the cost, since it seems you have to replace the switch as well to get the dimming to work -- at least that's what we've found.

    We have CFLs in most of our nondimmable lamps and fixtures, but probably half of our lamps and fixtures are dimmable, and in those we mostly have incandescents, and a few LEDs.  I'd love to see the cost of all green technology to come down, that's for sure.


     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from qo. Show qo's posts

    Re: LED lighting - the Q & A's

    CFLs are also toxic to those who have migraines, seizures, etc. I hope that LED costs can somehow be subsidized on the national level, if the over expenses of producing them cannot eb brought down.  Get rid of fossil fuel subsidies and switch to renewables and post-incandescents!
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from jazz568. Show jazz568's posts

    Re: LED lighting - the Q & A's

    Indeed.  For now try to keep the CFL far away from your body as possible. 

    As to the dimming function, many LED bulbs are now capable of smooth dimming but you need to select carefully.  Make sure it says it is compatible with standard household triac dimmers.  


    They dim flawlessly. Well, perhaps not down to 5% but I don't mind it cutting off at about 20% or so.  

    You almost have to test it to find out. I have tested many so called dimmable LEDs and they are not created equal. 
     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from Jim-in-Littleton. Show Jim-in-Littleton's posts

    Re: LED lighting - the Q & A's

    CFLs can be bought in dimmable versions as well and there is no need for anything other than the same dimmer switches you've been using for incandescents.

    You can also find 3-way CFLs that will work perfectly in lamps that have 3-way switches.
     

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