September 2012

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from toytrumpet. Show toytrumpet's posts

    Re: September 2012

    Thanks for posting the recipe for the Lemonade Cake, Pingo.  I've tucked it in with my possibles for Sunday dessert.

    Made up another banana bread with leftover choc chips, half small semi sweet and half large dark chocolate!  Don't like to get down to nothing in the freezer or under the cake dome for drop in guests.

    Toyroom got a spiffing, not much else to do, will wash down the woodwork in there tomorrow, but most of the "clutter" is actually toys.  Try to rearrange them so ones they haven't played with in a while are noticed the next time they come.

    What a gorgeous day.  Lots of joggers going by, taking advantage of the sun and comfortable temps.

    The Asian pears (apple pears) I bought at T.J.'s yesterday are delicious.  Very mild, but crunchy and very juicy.  Glad I fell upon them.  Of course, after a healthy snack of Asian pear, I topped it off with Brigham's coffee ice cream!

    Banana bread is smelling good, better go check the oven and timer.  Banana bread is one of those things that you never (at least I never) can pinpoint down to an exact time it will take to bake.  Hope everyone is enjoying this beautiful day.  --  Amber, thinking of you and hope you are out on your patio, soaking up the sun and fresh air.

     

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from Ihavemyhats. Show Ihavemyhats's posts

    Re: September 2012

    So, from the banana bread and wowie cake instances, we can draw the lesson that almost any cake or quick bread can be prepared in a smaller size by adjusting the baking time. 

    For example, my mom used to make little blueberry cheesecake tarts in a min-muffin/cupcake pan/paper liner, but Paula Deen makes them in a regular size cupcake tin. 

    Sometimes, you may question whether greasing the tin or using a paper cup cake liner is best.  If one were converting an apple bread or other fruity recipe, greasing may be the best way to go.

     

     

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from toytrumpet. Show toytrumpet's posts

    Re: September 2012

    John  decided to go skiing with his buddy, Dan. So  they  loaded up John's minivan and headed North.   

    After  driving for a few hours, they got caught in a terrible  blizzard, so they pulled into a nearby farm and asked the attractive lady who answered the door if they could spend  the night.

    "I realize it's terrible weather out there and I have this huge  house all to myself, but I'm recently widowed," she  explained. "I'm afraid the neighbors will talk if I let you  stay in my house."   

    "Don't  worry," John said.  "We'll be happy to sleep in the barn, and  if the weather breaks, we'll be gone at first light."  The  lady agreed, and the two men found their way to  the  barn and settled in for the night.

    Come morning, the weather had cleared, and they got on their way.  They  enjoyed a great weekend of skiing.  But about nine months later, John got an unexpected letter from  an attorney.  It took him a few minutes to figure it out, but  he finally determined that it was from the attorney of that attractive widow he had met on the ski weekend.    

    He  dropped in on his friend Dan and asked,  "Dan, do you  remember that good looking widow from the farm we stayed at on our ski holiday up north about 9 months ago?"

    "Yes,  I do," said Dan.

    "Did  you, er, happen to get up in the middle of the night, go up  to the house and pay her a visit?"

    "Well, um, yes!," Dan said, a little embarrassed about being  found out,  "I have to admit that I did."

    "And  did you happen to give her my name instead of telling her  your name?"

    Dan's  face turned beet red and he said,  "Yeah,  look, I'm sorry, buddy. I'm afraid I did." Why do you ask?"

    "She  just died and left me everything."  

    (And  you thought the ending would be different,  didn't  you?... You know you smiled...now  keep that smile  for  the rest of the day!) 


     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from pingo. Show pingo's posts

    Re: September 2012

    Good Sunday morning,
    Oh how I love these mornings, when I wake up in a cool bedroom, with a breeze coming in the windows. Unfortunately, it also means, I cannot share my cuppa witht the birds. Later today, when the sun gets power, it will be nice to sit outside and read. Could always pour myself another one.

    Heard that joke before, tt, but it still made me chuckle and I forwarded to friends, who - like I - are up in age and may have forgotten it.

    Nothing much on the docket today. DH has to go to the office; we have a couple of guys working overtime trying to make a deadline. I might go in for a couple of hours later. There is always work for me.

    Hope youall will have a good day - Pingo

     

     

     

     

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from toytrumpet. Show toytrumpet's posts

    Re: September 2012

    Good Sunday morning,

    Yeah, Pingo, most of the email jokes that come around have been around long enough that you and I have already heard them - LOL  Never hurts to take a chance on giving someone a smile tho.

    Breakfast just finished, coffee and choc chip banana bread, paper read, and can hear sounds from what probably is a game somewhere in town.  Most likely the younger kids.  My house is cold, and I dread changing out of this nice warm fleecy robe.  Time to bring down the heavier sweats and sweatshirts.  Will finish up the last of the chicken pie I bought.  That's served me well, with several meals.  Laundry to do today and a changing around of some of the lighter weight clothes to upstairs, and vice versa.  Cheerio has already disappeared, I'll be willing to bet under the comforter on my bed.  At least I did get the bed made this morning before she claimed her spot!

    Hope you all have a good day.

     

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: September 2012

    That was hilarious, and I hadn't seen it before! :)

    Dh is out with Gracie, it's 63 in the house, and I'm still in my fleece with more coffee...brrr!  I doubt the house will get above 66 unless I bake something.  I made the first pumpkin bread of the season yesterday with sprouted flour.  Came out fabulous, but now nothing to bake today...hm.

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from toytrumpet. Show toytrumpet's posts

    Re: September 2012

    Have you noticed ALL the recipes out already for pumpkin baked goods?  It's like pumpkin has made a resurge in popularity the last couple of years, claiming flavor in every baked good you can think of.  

     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: September 2012

    Yeah, tons!  I have no shortage of things to make, but we already have pumpkin bread I want to finish first.  For some reason dh didn't plant as many sugar pumpkins this year so instead of 50 we have 15...  I have no idea why since he happily ate pumpkin goods through February last year.

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from pingo. Show pingo's posts

    Re: September 2012

    tt, I noticed the same. I guess pumpkin have gained popularitry with the newer pumpkins. They are tastier - especially the smaller sugar pumpkins. It is not the old tasteless mushy stuff any more. They also hold up much better when using them in a cassarole f. ex.
    Also pumpkin have a loads of nutrition, that is good for you. It is one of the highest sources of Vit-A and it is low cal.
    For years, I have made my own pumpkin pure for my TG pies and bread. And no matter what people say, the canned stuff doesn't compare at all. When I have left over, I freeze it, and surprise someone with a pie or a bread during the darkest of the winter. - Pingo

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from toytrumpet. Show toytrumpet's posts

    Re: September 2012

    Along the same track, only a different ingredient - had just a few leftover dried figs from the last batch of fig squares, and since they don't have all that much flavor in that state, was keeping them in the fridge til I found something to do with them.  Flicking channels yesterday or the day before came to the Food channel and a chef was cutting them in half and tossing them in the tomato gravy mixture around his oven pot roast!  Said it lended a nice sweet flavor to the acidity.  I'm thinking even beef stroganoff (which I'm more likely to make for myself than a roast) might be good with a couple thrown in to simmer.  Especially paired with the sour cream?

     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: September 2012

    Sounds good!

     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from pingo. Show pingo's posts

    Re: September 2012

    Ummm! That sounds tasty, tt. If you like  sweetness to your Stroganoff, add a Tbs. or two of Trappist's Red Current Jelly. That's my secret ingredients to my meat gravies. It's a staple in my refrigerator. - Pingo

     

     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from toytrumpet. Show toytrumpet's posts

    Re: September 2012

    I wasn't actually looking to add sweetness to the stroganoff, just looking to use those leftover figs in some way that would enhance their flavor.  Simmering in the gravy sounded good to me.  Have stroganoff on my list for next week, beef, mushrooms, sour cream, broad noodles - I'm salivating already!

     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from pingo. Show pingo's posts

    Re: September 2012

    I know, tt. You were trying to use your figs, and it does sound wonderful.
    But if you don't have figs around, try the Red Currant Jelly. I get lot of praise for my gravies ("Could eat it with a spoon") - and no one can figure out, what make it exeptional. LOL
    - Pingo

     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from Ihavemyhats. Show Ihavemyhats's posts

    Re: September 2012

    Kar, do you have butternut or other winter/firm squashes from your garden?  Because you can peel and prepare them just like pumpkin and use them as you would pumpkin puree.  Pumpkins are squash, you know.  Some people, me among them, prefer squash pie to pumpkin pie.  Of course, our ancestors prepared it for one meal, took the leftovers and added eggs, cream and sugar, and put it in pie crust. 

    The people who settled Massachusetts were mostly from places where fireplaces had ovens - what we call beehive ovens because of their shape -and anything could be put in pie crust - and transported to fields or school if made in turnover shapes - leftover meat, stewed fruit, leftover veg - combinations of two or three - and that's why New Englanders like pie.  In fact, pie for breakfast was a NE staple because it was made while the fire was burned down to ashes, and could be eaten in the am before the fire was kindled/hot enough to cook.  Add a slice of cheese and you have your protein..

     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from toytrumpet. Show toytrumpet's posts

    Re: September 2012

    Interesting, Hats.  My son and DIL were at Rockport Friday and there was a woman selling "pork pies" (really the size of small turnovers, my son said).  I forget what else besides the pork was in them, but noted were pistachios!  She said it was an old English recipe, made so people could take them with them to eat.  (They didn't buy any, she was selling them out of a basket - no refrigeration).

     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from pingo. Show pingo's posts

    Re: September 2012

    That is interesting, both Hats and tt. Great history lesson. Never heard of pork pies. Wouldn't buy them "out of a basket" either. I googled it and found, it is an English New Years tradition, eaten with ketchup and mustard. Have to ask UK son, if he has tried them. He finds British food pretty tasteless and w/o any imagination. He just came back from a trip to Luxemburg, where he delighted in lots of delicious food. Interesting, how such a small distance can make such a culinary difference. - Pingo

     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: September 2012

    Thanks, hats, we can definitely use butternut.  I like those in soup or whipped like mashed potatoes, though.  

    Tt, I saw a show on the Food Network all about those pies, very interesting.  The crust was tough to hold together in lunch boxes and the meat cured to not spoil.  They looked and sounded horrible!

    Pingo, culinary anthropology is fascinating, indeed.  English cooking is awful, and French...well, oui oui to that!

     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from Ihavemyhats. Show Ihavemyhats's posts

    Re: September 2012

    No No Englsh cooking is great done the right way!  Apple pie is English! Baked beans are English! Roast Beef and Roast Lamb -English. In fat, the French used to call the English "les rosbifs."  And the English returned the favor by calling the French, "the frogs." 
    Which would you rather eat?

    Cornish pasties are English, plum pudding, English.  Have you ever had a raised pie?  A foot tall cylinder of crust, inside, veal and ham with an aspic type  gravy poured in through a hole in the top?  Delicious, but no one cooks that way any more.  If you think English food is bad, you've only had the low-grade stuff.

     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from toytrumpet. Show toytrumpet's posts

    Re: September 2012

    My mother made a "plum pudding" - English - tho it really was a steamed pudding, no plums were in it.  I still make it at Christmas, tho I've had to give up using the empty coffee can, now they all have a lip on them that makes it impossible to slide the pudding out.  Not the same in a dish as molded in a coffee can.  Knew I should have held onto that last one I had!

     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from Ihavemyhats. Show Ihavemyhats's posts

    Re: September 2012

    The Brits use "plum" for what we call "raisin."  So plum pudding is a pudding made with raisins and what we call white raisins and they call "sultanas."  Other dried fruits can be  added as well.


    My dad used to go over the river to get a "Plum loaf" which we would call "raisin bread."

     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from toytrumpet. Show toytrumpet's posts

    Re: September 2012

    Ours has mincemeat in it which of course consists mainly of raisins.  I love it.  She made a sweet sugar sauce we served hot over it.  Only 2 of my boys like it, and then one slice does them for the year, so I end up freezing slices and pulling it out when I want a treat.

     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: September 2012

    I'm 1/4 English.  I like bread pudding a lot.

    Anyway, dh went to bed at 8 and I'm getting sleepy earlier than usual myself...company was great, but I think we're both worn out.

    Monday tomorrow, and we could really use another day to chill.  But, I'll be off to the chiropractor befre we know it.  Then, friend in town is coming over to walk with me and Gracie.  Might make more salsa verde with the green tomatoes that are left.  It's getting cool so they'll probably not turn red.

     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from Ihavemyhats. Show Ihavemyhats's posts

    Re: September 2012

    TT, do you have the sauce recpe? I ask because my mom had a pudding sauce recipe for which I am looking...it had butter, sugar and cornstarch....

     
  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from princess-cal. Show princess-cal's posts

    Re: September 2012

    Good Morning All,

    Been reading up on the posts, but haven't had anything exciting to say.  Just plugging away at work, etc.

    TT - Stroganoff is one of my favorites.  My mom mad it when I was a kid and now I make it.  It really is delicious!!!!

    Funny thing, as you probably know, I am such a big veggie lover, however, I just don't like pumpkin.  Too sweet for  me.  I wish I could get into sweets, but I really have such an aversion for anything sweet - strange!!

    Hope to hear about Winter's trip.  I love TX!!

     

     

     
Sections
Shortcuts

Share