What We're Reading

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from toytrumpet. Show toytrumpet's posts

    What We're Reading

    Good morning,

    We mention books a lot so thought I would start a separate thread.

    Had a wonderful experience of going to the Used Books store in Danvers yesterday. It was while we were in there that my friend got a call about a family emergency and we had to leave, so I can't give a detailed description of what they carry, but I can tell you it is a very well stocked, organized, neat, clean bookstore with all the books on shelves - no bins to paw through. All categories, even audio books. I had just got started on the alphabetical paperback (all $1.99) shelves, and picked up a couple that I'll let you know how they were when I've had a chance to read them.

    "This Cold Country" by Annabel Davis-Goff, about a young Irish woman during World War II. The author was born in Ireland (mothermitzi take note) and also wrote The Dower House and Walled Gardens.

    The other book is a 1989 vintage, "Brighten the Corner Where You Are"
    by Fred Chapell. "A story about a North Carolina mountain man, schoolteacher, sly prankster, country philosopher, and family man"
    says the write up. But it was the inscription on the inside cover that made me want to pick it up: "To my dear friend, The Bear, a true surgical savant, Love and Joy at Christmas." If this guy picked out this book as a Christmas gift for his "dear friend", I figured it must be worth reading.

    The Used Books also has one other branch in Burlington.

    Hope this information is of use to some other book reader out there.

    tt
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from pingo. Show pingo's posts

    What We're Reading

    Good morning tt, where in Danvers is this book store? Addy please? - Pingo
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from toytrumpet. Show toytrumpet's posts

    What We're Reading

    [Quote]Good morning tt, where in Danvers is this book store? Addy please? - Pingo[/Quote]

    Endicott Plaza, where M.B., Savers, and Big Lots is. It's next to Savers.

    tt
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from putt1. Show putt1's posts

    What We're Reading

    Great thread tt

    There was also a used book store on Jefferson Ave in Salem called Annie's Books but they closed. Could never understand why as they always seemed busy. Will have to check the one in Danvers. Fortunately our local COA has a wonderful lending library and seem to have the latest in book titles.

    Right now I am reading "Whitethorn Woods" by Maeve Binchy. Not one of my favorites. I did read another Ken Follett "Night Over Water" and am still struggling with "Sarum". I also have "Saving Graces" by Patricia Gaffney but something tells me I've read it before. My friend goes to the library quite often and after reading a book she puts a very light check mark someplace in the book that she would remember. Not a bad idea.

    Have a nice weekend.

    putt

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from Ken1935. Show Ken1935's posts

    What We're Reading

    I just finished reading Follett's "World Without End". It was voer 900 pages and took me forever, but it was a great book.

    Now I am into James Patterson's "Cross Country", a murder mystery. His main character that is in several of his books is called Alex Cross.

    I have a stack of about 10 or so more that my wife ordered for me. I tell her what authors I like and she keeps a list of ones i want and ones i have read and I am way behind because it took me so long to read that Follett book.

    I read "Night over Water" a short time ago. My son had the paper back and i read it while waiting for new books to come in.
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from pingo. Show pingo's posts

    What We're Reading

    Could anyone please tell me, what "Night over Waters" is all about? Is it a historic novel like Pillars - which I loved. Took time to read, but I loved it.
     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from putt1. Show putt1's posts

    What We're Reading

    Hi pingo

    "Night Over Water" takes place in 1939. England is at war with Nazi Germany. The worlds most luxurious airliner, which they call a floating hotel, is on it's final flight to America. You have the cream of society and the not so nice. The people on board and their circumstances make it a great mystery. I should tell you there are 524 pages.

    putt
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from pingo. Show pingo's posts

    What We're Reading

    Thanks putt! Somehow the Nazies and the second WW is not on my list of books to read. Had too many bad memories from that time. I am glad I asked and I am glad you gave me a good picture. Thanks again - Pingo

    [Quote]Hi pingo

    "Night Over Water" takes place in 1939. England is at war with Nazi Germany. The worlds most luxurious airliner, which they call a floating hotel, is on it's final flight to America. You have the cream of society and the not so nice. The people on board and their circumstances make it a great mystery. I should tell you there are 524 pages.

    putt[/Quote]
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from shetaz0028. Show shetaz0028's posts

    What We're Reading

    Authors really depend on my mood. If I want something rather light and non thought provoking I like Jude Deveraux or Nora Roberts. I read a lot of W.E.B. Griffen so I can discuss them with the hubby. But, military books tend to wear me out. I do have some favorites that I can read over and over though. Archangel by Sharon Shinn, anything by Dickens, Memoirs of a Geisha. My daughter brought home the "Memoirs of a Geisha" movie and it was horrible. So much was lost. I would much rather read than see a movie.

    The used book store in Burlington..I LOVE that place. I've donated a lot of books there and have brought home even more. We are going to have to keep the extra room when my youngest moves out and turn it into a library..haha
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from toytrumpet. Show toytrumpet's posts

    What We're Reading

    Good morning Shetaz (still haven't gotten off the computer, hope my company comes much later this morning!),

    Reading the books you like, I have a wonderful book to recommend: The Samurai's Garden by Gail Tsukiyama. I read that at least once a year. I end up with a very peaceful feeling each time after reading it. It's about a young Chinese man who on the eve of World War II is sent to his family's summer home in Japan. If you've never picked up a book by G.T., I think you'll find you like her stories. She also wrote "Woman of the Silk", another wonderful book about the young girls put to work in the silk factories. When you read her books you feel as tho you're there with them.

    Enjoy.

    tt
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from toytrumpet. Show toytrumpet's posts

    What We're Reading

    Good morning,

    I highly recommend Elizabeth Berg's collection of short stories, "The Day I Ate Whatever I Wanted" - particularly the one I just read, "Mrs. Ethel Menafee and Mrs. Birdie Stoltz". It's the kind of friendship women of my generation can relate to - two old ladies growing older together through good times and bad.

    tt
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from Ken1935. Show Ken1935's posts

    What We're Reading

    I just finished John Sanford's Heat Lightning. My next one is David Baldacci's Divine Justice.
    I used to read alot of W.E.B. Griffin, but have stuck mostly to mystery now.

    I can't recall the author but there was a series of books by a woman writer and they all started with 'The Cat Who....". They were mysteries with some comedy.
     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from pingo. Show pingo's posts

    What We're Reading

    Bump!
     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from toytrumpet. Show toytrumpet's posts

    What We're Reading


    "I can't recall the author but there was a series of books by a woman writer and they all started with 'The Cat Who....". They were mysteries with some comedy"

    Her name is Lilian Jackson Braun. We have her series at the library. Did you read any of them? Enjoy them?

    tt
     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from Ken1935. Show Ken1935's posts

    What We're Reading

    [Quote]

    "I can't recall the author but there was a series of books by a woman writer and they all started with 'The Cat Who....". They were mysteries with some comedy"

    Her name is Lilian Jackson Braun. We have her series at the library. Did you read any of them? Enjoy them?

    tt
    [/Quote]

    I think I read them all. Loved them all too
     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from Ken1935. Show Ken1935's posts

    What We're Reading

    [Quote]Bump![/Quote]

    What does that mean?
     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from mothermitzi. Show mothermitzi's posts

    What We're Reading

    [Quote]

    What does that mean?[/Quote]


    Hi Ken -

    Because it takes bdc an inordinate amount of time for some postings to appear, one way to make them appear is to post yourself. That forces the previous post to appear. TT came up with "bump" and we use that word for this purpose.


    mothermitzi
     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from pingo. Show pingo's posts

    What We're Reading

    Bump! means I/you cannot read the latest posts - so in order to get them, one has to submit a post. If I don't have anything interesting to say - I go Bump! -- and voilá there they show up.


    [Quote]

    What does that mean?[/Quote]
     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from toytrumpet. Show toytrumpet's posts

    What We're Reading

    "but there is something thrilling about perusing shelves of old/used books and finding a book, long out of print, "

    I love to poke around in old book stores. In Laconia or Meredith NH on a rise on the main highway, there was a wonderful old Book Barn filled with all sorts of treasures. Summers when we would vacation up there, that was always a stop of mine. The proprietor was so helpful and would let you know whether the book you were looking for was one she could scout down for you. Lots of times I just went in to poke through the shelves, with nothing particular in mind. They even had a children's room with old and new editions of the Golden Books I used to buy weekly at the supermarket for my boys. Unfortunately this past summer there was a big "closing" sign. She had died and the heirs were selling off everything. I expect next summer the old house and barn will have been torn down to make room for some developer's grand scheme of things. I hate to see changes like that that to me aren't necessarily progress.

    tt
     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from LeasyII. Show LeasyII's posts

    What We're Reading

    Im smack in the middle of The Life of Edgar Sawtelle - it took me forever to get into it, (because I'm not a fan of dogs) but now its getting really good. Its about a family that owns a dog breeding farm, and one day the dad dies, the son is convinced its murder, even though the docs said it was an aneurism - and that's about as far as I've gotten...
     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from circles82. Show circles82's posts

    What We're Reading

    I just finished The Whiskey Rebels by David Liss.

    It takes place in PA in 1792. There are two parallel stories which inevitably meet up - one from each side of the story of the whiskey runners from Pittsburgh and the Hamiltonians in Philadelphia working on establishing a national bank and a tax on whiskey.

    As the official review says, "Both are patriots in their own way, and, as each is swept up in the dramatic events unfolding, the will be faced with redemption - or death."

    It was hard for me to put the book down. 544 pages in the hardcover, although I read mine digitally. Greatly prefer the paper experience, but the digital was free and I can't argue with that right now. Would highly recommend.
     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from mothermitzi. Show mothermitzi's posts

    What We're Reading

    Hi circles -

    This looks like a book I'd like. I enjoy historical novels - fiction or non-fiction. I loved David McCullough's book, 'John Adams.' He won the Pulitzer for it. Of course, it's been out six or seven years now but an excellent read if you missed it.

    mothermitzi
     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from toytrumpet. Show toytrumpet's posts

    What We're Reading

    For those of us who like to cook, and enjoy a book of reminiscences along with recipes, try, "A Homemade Life: Stories and Recipes from my Kitchen Table" by Molly Wizenberg (The Creator of Orangette). She is a regular contributor to Bon Appetit and has her own blog.

    I brought it home from the library this week and am really enjoying the stories that go along with the recipes from her childhood. Light, enjoyable reading, with quite a few chuckles thrown in.

    tt
     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from Ken1935. Show Ken1935's posts

    What We're Reading

    You guys read such SERIOUS stuff. After I retired I vowed never to read serious stuff again. Takes too much brain power. Time to let the old brain cells rest and read mysteries.
     
  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from icer. Show icer's posts

    What We're Reading

    Reading huh...i used to get read to ,to fall asleep....I read to my son to get him to fall asleep...Everytime I pick up a book...I read a pragraph or two and....fall asleep
     

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