I need a really good chili recipe!

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    I need a really good chili recipe!

    The best chili recipe I have found is Craig Claiborne's in The New York Times Cookbook.I use it as my guide and then add my touches.�I do not eat red meat so�I do not typically use ground beef in the actual chili. I brown some very lean (ground sirloin for my italian butcher) on the side for my son and husband. I add lots of chilli powder (3 tablespoons) no Cayenne. Lots of fresh ground black pepper, a teaspoon of adobo and a teaspoon or 2 of ancho chilli either ground or buy the dried pepper and crush a teaspoon or 2 of �it in a mortar and pestle. I add both ground cumin ( 1 teaspoon) and fresh ground cumin seed (2 teaspoons) again in a mortar and pestle.�If you want it hotter ( this is spicy but not hot) add a� teaspoon of good quality� cayenne to taste. Use 1 large can of crushed tomatoes ( i think it 20 oz) and use the 3 cups of water he calls for. It will cook down to a lovely consitency it does take awhile.Make sure all your spices are very fresh. If you need a good source Pensey's is wonderful spice house.�Do not let it get beyond a simmerIt will burn on th ebottom and you will taste it. Let it simmer till you like the texture. Serve it in bowls with or without rice(I perfer it without)�Add some grated sahrp cheddar and some low fat sour cream if you like.�Bon Apetite!

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from rdigiacomo. Show rdigiacomo's posts

    I need a really good chili recipe!

    I'd start by scrapping the ground beef in favor of either stew beef or better yet, sirloin tips cut up in small pieces (if you buy it on sale, it's the same price as stew meat and infintely better). You can also add pork (dice up a pork chop), lamb and chicken for added flavor. Also, one slice of bacon, cut into small pieces.Buy some ancho chiles (dried poblanos) and maybe add some dried anaheims as well.� Rehyrdrate them in hot water for about 30 mins along with a couple of whole cloves of garlic (remove the seeds first).Brown the bacon and then brown the meat(s) in the bacon drippings (season the meat with some kosher salt first).� You'll need to brown the meat in small batches otherwise the liquid released will end up steaming the meat and you won't get caramelization.� Some like to dredge the meat in flour first... it thickens things a little and is a matter of personal taste.��Once the meat is browned, transfer the rehydrated chiles, garlic cloves & as much of the water (which will be a deep red/brown by now) into either a blender or food processor and liquefy.� Using a strainer, pour this concotion over the meat and bring to a simmer.�Pouor the remaining water in as well.� You can use a plastic spatula to push the mixture through the strainer and don't forget to scrape off the paste on the outside of the strainer and add it to the chili - what's left inside the strainer will be the�skins of the peppers which you'll be picking from your teeth if you skip this step.�Add one bottle of beer, preferably a lager or pilsner�(not anything dark or amber).� Add either a small can of tomato paste or some canned crushed tomatoes (tomatoes are optional for the purists).� Add cumin, oregano, chili powder, a packet of Sazon Goya if you have it... salt... to taste.� Add one diced onion.� Oregano is as important as cumin in chili and often overlooked.Simmer for a few� hours (at least four).� Add more�seasonings about�when there's about an hour left of cooking time.� Serve w/ a dollop of sour cream and some chopped cilantro or chopped scallions (or both).� It's more of a stew than a�usual ground beef chili but more traditional too.� This recipe has plenty of variations.� You can�add some diced, sauteed fresh poblano peppers (adds nice color and flavor).��You can try toasting then crushing cumin seeds instead of ground cumin.� Lightly toast the dried chiles before hydrating them.� You can even make your own home made chili powder by toasting ancho, anaheim or other dried peppers and grinding them with some garlic powder and oregano.� You can add cayenne if this isn't hot enough for you, but it's a pretty good flavor/heat combination as is - again, a matter of personal choice.���You can even add a small can of chipotle peppers but this can overpower the dish... if you like chipotles then it's not a bad thing.� Sometimes I'm in the mood for them, sometimes�not.Enjoy

     
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