Salt oer Seasalt?

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from pingo. Show pingo's posts

    Salt oer Seasalt?

    For years and years I have used Kosher Salt. The large red box with a diamond on it. I have a beanpot next to my stove, where I just put my hands in, pick up salt and sprinkle to my liking. No measuring, no tasting - everyting comes out great  - at least that is what they tell me.
    My DIL introduced me  to Sea Salt. She was totally upset, that I don' t use Sea Salt. "You are using THAT stuff?"
    So just to please her and maybe learn something new and better - I went to the market and bought seasalt for $$/lbs.
    I have been using it in several of my recipes - but truly, honestly - i do not find it taste better. What are you great cooks' take on this?
    Ps. I have never, ever used the round boxed iodized salt.
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from johnath. Show johnath's posts

    Re: Saly oer Seasali?

    Pingo, I use the round box to salt the water for pasta. I use Kosher salt for everything else. Why? Because that is what I started with. It would be interesting to hear from people who use both. Can you tell the difference?
    Here is another thing I do because my parents did it. I break my long pasta in half and then put it in the pot.  I find it easier to eat and it taste the same. I do not know anybody outside of my family that does that.
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from pingo. Show pingo's posts

    Re: Saly oer Seasali?

    Interesting. I break my pasta in half too. Who has a pot large enough to hold the large "sticks"?  Like you say, they taste the same and are a lot easier to eat. I know one can buy a pasta pot. I never understood why someone would clutter up the kitchen with a pot, that can only be used for one thing only.

    Pingo, I use the round box to salt the water for pasta. I use Kosher salt for everything else. Why? Because that is what I started with. It would be interesting to hear from people who use both. Can you tell the difference? Here is another thing I do because my parents did it. I break my long pasta in half and then put it in the pot.  I find it easier to eat and it taste the same. I do not know anybody outside of my family that does that.
    Posted by johnath

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from Txgrl82. Show Txgrl82's posts

    Re: Salt oer Seasalt?

    I've wondered the same thing for a while...I found this on Food Network:

     What is the difference between kosher salt, sea salt, and table salt?

    A: For the cook's purposes, the main difference between salts is in their texture. Table salt's fine granules dissolve quickly, making it the preferred salt of bakers.

    Sea salt and kosher salt possess larger, irregular grains that add a delightful crunch and hit of briny flavor when sprinkled on food at the last minute. Generally, savvy cooks prefer kosher salt when cooking, since its coarse texture is easier to take a pinch of when seasoning savory dishes.


    Chemically there is little difference between kitchen salts. All are at least 97 1/2 percent sodium chloride. But there are significant differences in the provenance and processing of these salts.


    Table salt is mined from underground salt deposits, and includes a small portion of calcium silicate, an anti-caking agent added to prevent clumping. It possesses very fine crystals and a sharp taste. Because of its fine grain a single teaspoon of table salt contains more salt than a tablespoon of kosher or sea salt.


    Sea salt is harvested from evaporated seawater and receives little or no processing, leaving intact the minerals from the water it came from. These minerals flavor and color the salt slightly. However, because these salts are usually expensive, it is worth keeping in mind that they lose their unique flavor when cooked or dissolved.


    Kosher salt takes its name from its use in the koshering process. It contains no preservatives and can be derived from either seawater or underground sources. Aside from being a great salt to keep within arm's reach when you are cooking, it is particularly useful in preserving, because its large crystals draw moisture out of meats and other foods more effectively than other salts.

    Pingo, sounds like you were doing it the right way all along Smile Hope this helps!

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Salt oer Seasalt?

    Good info, Txgrl, thanks.  My aunt is a chiropractor and nutritionist, and I've learned the same things from her so sounds Kosher to me (get it?!  HA!).

    pingo, if you don't want to break your pasta to get it to fit, what I do when it matters, like for lasagna noodles for instance, is put the pasta in the boiling water and then after about 10 - 15 seconds, gently press the noodles into the pot, curving them around the sides.  They succumb with gentle pressure.  If you can't stand the steam on your hands, of course you can use a wooden spoon or something, but I find they tend to break more easily that way.

    As Txgrl pointed out, all edible salt is essentially chemically the same so it acts the same way in your body and does the same thing to the boiling point of water (why you add it to pasta aside from taste).  If you do not use iodized salt, though, make sure you get your iodine somewhere else.  A multivitamin is the surefire way.  It got added to table salt for a reason - we just don't tend to get enough.

    Pingo's DIL has a right to be horrified by anything she wants, but the health benefits of sea salt are mainly hype.  To your blood pressure, it's all the same.  And, as far as minerals go, see Txgrls fab post.

    Wow, this is disjointed, sorry.  No energy to edit today. :)

    ~kar
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from johnath. Show johnath's posts

    Re: Salt oer Seasalt?

    kargiver, I use noboil noodles. It is a lot easier.  
     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from Txgrl82. Show Txgrl82's posts

    Re: Salt oer Seasalt?


    Awe, thanks kargiver! I try to make thoughtful contributions when I can :-)

    I do have a can of sea salt at home and it does say that there's no iodide in it, to go back to what you stated re: proper iodine intake...

    My sister uses the no boil noodles, they are delicious! For some reason I feel like the consistency is much closer to fresh pasta...I loooove my sister's lasagna...

    I also wait till the water has started to soften the pasta a bit before I "squish" it down....my grandmother and everyone else in my family breaks it in half. I go back and forth depending on my mood...
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Salt oer Seasalt?

    Awe, thanks kargiver! I try to make thoughtful contributions when I can :-) I do have a can of sea salt at home and it does say that there's no iodine in it, to go back to what you stated re: proper iodine intake... My sister uses the no boil noodles, they are delicious! For some reason I feel like the consistency is much closer to fresh pasta...I loooove my sister's lasagna... I also wait till the water has started to soften the pasta a bit before I "squish" it down....my grandmother and everyone else in my family breaks it in half. I go back and forth depending on my mood...
    Posted by Txgrl82


    You always contribute great things!

    There is iodized sea salt - I've seen it at Whole Foods, but they must sell it elsewhere, too.

    If you want, try bending the pasta after just 10 seconds or so - I think you'll be surprised to find it doesn't tend to snap even though it's not softer.  I know what you mean about cooking mood.  There are times I have more patience in the kitchen than others.

    Have a savory day everyone!  Wink
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from pingo. Show pingo's posts

    Re: Salt oer Seasalt?

    Hi txgrl, thanks for your most excellent piece on the different versions of salt. I went back to use my Kosher Salt - but leave the Sea Salt box out, when my DIL is visiting - just to keep peace in the family. Haha!
    Kar, I also used to bend the spaghetti and lasagne noodles the way you do. But truly, who says spaghetti has to be a certain lenght. It is quite a surprise to me that the noodle industry hasn't even caught on and make spaghetti 'half size'. All the people I know break theirs in half.
    Ever since the 'no-boil' lasagna noodles came on the market ages ago, I have used them. Not only are they much easier to use, but their shape is also much easier to deal with. They just fit perfectly in my lasagna pan. The only time I use the long lasagna noodles, is when I make lasagna roll ups. (Roll the cheeses and stuff inside the lasagna noodle and have them stand on end tight together, then pour he sauce over them. Add cheese and bake). If you have a large party and a buffet, they are a lot easier to serve this way instead of cutting through the lasagna.
    Well, you made my taste buds swell. Think we will have lasagna for dinner tomorrow with a big salad and home made bread. - P
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from johnath. Show johnath's posts

    Re: Salt oer Seasalt?

    pingo, If you take the no-boil and soak them is warm water about 5 min you can roll them, cut them in thirds and bake the same way. They are just a little smaller.
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Salt oer Seasalt?

    Thanks, jon and pingo for the no boil suggestion - I'd never thought of that.  I'm intolerant to GMO wheat (I don't digest it well, I'm not a health freak), so we try to get USDA Organic pasta.  Do you have knowledge of a brand or where I can get no boil organic pasta?  Probably Whole Foods....

    1/2 size pasta, I love it, pingo!
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from pingo. Show pingo's posts

    Re: Salt oer Seasalt?

    Jonath my friend, you made my day!
    Will definitely try that. Kicking myself. How come I never thought of that? Thanks!
    You and others, is why I love the Chat. We give advice to each other, that is never publishes any where else, but can make so much difference in our day to day life.

    pingo, If you take the no-boil and soak them is warm water about 5 min you can roll them, cut them in thirds and bake the same way. They are just a little smaller.
    Posted by johnath

     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from pingo. Show pingo's posts

    Re: Salt oer Seasalt?

    Kar, I don' t know of any place that offer Organic Pasta, since I am not looking for it. Your best bet will most likely be Whole Foods or some other Natural Food store. Stop and Shop also have a section with natural stuff. I have bought their whole wheat pasta, but we don't like it. Too strong a taste, too chewy.
    But truly, we do not eat pasta more than maybe twice a month - max. So I don't think it will make much difference for us as far as allergies are concerned. I am the one with tons of allergies.
    Sometimes I feel one can do a disfavor to oneself by catering to ones problems. I am highly allergic to Egg Plant f. ex. But I have been trying for years to take just a bit of it, and as the years have passed by - I can eat it in a larger amounts. Not much, I tell you - but enough to not make my hostess uncomfortable.


    Thanks, jon and pingo for the no boil suggestion - I'd never thought of that.  I'm intolerant to GMO wheat (I don't digest it well, I'm not a health freak), so we try to get USDA Organic pasta.  Do you have knowledge of a brand or where I can get no boil organic pasta?  Probably Whole Foods.... 1/2 size pasta, I love it, pingo!
    Posted by kargiver

     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Salt oer Seasalt?

    Kar, I don' t know of any place that offer Organic Pasta, since I am not looking for it. Your best bet will most likely be Whole Foods or some other Natural Food store. Stop and Shop also have a section with natural stuff. I have bought their whole wheat pasta, but we don't like it. Too strong a taste, too chewy. But truly, we do not eat pasta more than maybe twice a month - max. So I don't think it will make much difference for us as far as allergies are concerned. I am the one with tons of allergies. Sometimes I feel one can do a disfavor to oneself by catering to ones problems. I am highly allergic to Egg Plant f. ex. But I have been trying for years to take just a bit of it, and as the years have passed by - I can eat it in a larger amounts. Not much, I tell you - but enough to not make my hostess uncomfortable.
    Posted by pingo


    Thanks, pingo, dear - I totally agree.  I do eat pizza and other wheat that I know isn't organic, what a pain life would be otherwise.  But, the bloating makes me feel fat, and the gas...my goodness, the gas.  LOL
     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from pingo. Show pingo's posts

    Re: Salt oer Seasalt?

    Haha Kar, the gas! You are so right. Lots of things make me gassy. I sometimes wake up at night and feel like a balloon taking off. But it is not enough to make me stop eating.
    However, eggplant makes my mouth tissues swell to a point, where I am worried about my throat swelling (thus cutting off my breathing). But I have trained myself to get better in the eggplant department.
    Funny thing - I can eat small amount of eggplant dip w/o any problems. A friend of mine told me it is the peel people are allergic to. I still try to avoid it altogether.

    Thanks, pingo, dear - I totally agree.  I do eat pizza and other wheat that I know isn't organic, what a pain life would be otherwise.  But, the bloating makes me feel fat, and the gas...my goodness, the gas .  LOL
    Posted by kargiver

     
Sections
Shortcuts

Share