Any recipes to contribute?

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from Grannyof7. Show Grannyof7's posts

    Re: Any recipes to contribute?

    Hi Kargiver, Thanks for sharing that information and I just called my daughter and told her to go check out what you said. Her husband has a lot of problems with certain things he eats and she will be sure to try out your suggestions. 

    Thanks again
    Granny
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Any recipes to contribute?

    Oh, that's great, Granny - I hope he finds them as tolerable (health wise) and tasty as my DH.

    P.S.  My aunt is a chiropractor and nutritionist, and she treats patients who have issues digesting genetically modified grains.  They are often misdiagnosed by MDs as being "gluten intolerant."  However, if it's really the genetic modifications, simply avoiding GMO foods (all corn, wheat, and soy that isn't marked otherwise).  If someone IS truly gluten intolerant, though, be aware that spelt does have some gluten, but not as much as all-purpose white wheat flour.
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from lemoncoke. Show lemoncoke's posts

    Re: Any recipes to contribute?

    Spelt is what the Ancient Romans ate, so perhaps it will make you, Kar, and DH as tough and strong as the old Republicans, like Cato and Scipio and the Gracchi were!
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from pingo. Show pingo's posts

    Re: Any recipes to contribute?

    Granny,
    I didn't mean to offend you. I am your age and grew up with all the "good" stuff, which they now believe is not so good for us any longer.
    I always use the "real" stuff, whenever I cook or bake. Have never used sweeteners. But I try to cut down. In Winter's banana bread f. ex., I use 1/2 cup of sugar instead of 1 cup. Taste fine to us. I also use butter instead of oil. Like the taste better. Will have to try the applesauce next time.
    I make my own jam. The recipe I use calls for 1 cup of sugar - I use only 1/4 cup. It is sweet enough for us and one can taste the fruit.
    I also make my own ice cream with a lot less sugar than the recipe calls for.
    I use real mayo, the fake stuff make me gag. But I only use a smidgen.

    1-1/4 cup of brown sugar plus 3 Tbs. of white sugar in your 12 Pumpkin Muffins, sounds like a lot of sugar to me. I will make your muffins (have two sugar pumpkins waiting), but I will probably cut down the brown sugar to 1/2 or 3/4 cup. Will let you know, how it comes out. I am quite sure, it will be fine.

    I think the taste of sweetness is such an acquired thing. Whenever we go out for dinner, we hardly ever order desserts. They are simply much too sweet for us. Makes our saliva glands hurt.

    I do not have any low sugar recipes to contribute. I use the regular ones, just make my own adjustments. - Pingo

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from Grannyof7. Show Grannyof7's posts

    Re: Any recipes to contribute?

    Hi Pingo, you did not offend me at all, I completely understood where you were
    coming from and actually welcomed the new info on old recipes.  I do agree nothing can compete with the taste of using real butter.  My youngest daughter would make all sorts of comments about my buttercream frosting being an atery clogger on a plate and then she took a course in cake decorating and found out the reason all the bakeries have such startling white frosting is because they use colorless, artificial vanilla flavoring, artificial butter flavoring and lots of lard in their icings.  UGH.  She now eats her cakes here and refuses to buy with icing on it at the bakeries.
    Granny
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Any recipes to contribute?

    lemoncoke - lol, DH is big and strong at least!  I'm 5'3'' and stopped being able to lug Gracie around when she hit 50 lbs.  At 85 lbs, DH can still tote her like a big sack o' love. :)  Yes, it is an ancient grain...it's interesting to think about what company through the ages we're in to be eating so much of it.

    Granny, even my aunt endorses the use of real butter - isn't that GREAT?!  We are all too happy to comply with that doctor's order. :)  It has Vitamin K, and not many other foods do.  The hydrogenated oils in "other stuff" is worse for you than the saturated fat in butter in her opinion.  We like Kate's (in the green and white boxes).  YUM, butter!!!! 
     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from Grannyof7. Show Grannyof7's posts

    Re: Any recipes to contribute?

    Here is one for the butter lovers in our group.
    Granny

      Gooey Delicious butter cake

    What's Gooey Butter Cake? You can find it in bakeries all over the St. Louis area, but what's someone from out-of-town to do? Here's the answer. Enjoy making one at home from this recipe.

    1/2 cup butter
    1 box yellow cake mix
    3 eggs
    1 - 8 oz. package of cream cheese
    1/2 t vanilla extract
    4 cups of confectioners' sugar

    Preheat oven to 350. Lightly grease one 9x13 cake pan. Melt butter. Empty cake mix into a large bowl. Stir melted butter, along with one of the eggs, into the cake mix. Press mixture into pan. In a large bowl, mix cream cheese, vanilla extract, confectioners sugar (reserve about 1.4 c,. of the confectioners sugar) and the remaining two eggs. Beat for three minutes with an electric mixer set on medium high speed.

    Spread over top of the cake mixture in the pan. Bake at 350 for 35-45 minutes until golden brown on top. Allow cake to cool. Dust the top with remaining confectioners sugar.
    (Cake will be gooey on the top, so don't overbake!)

     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from pingo. Show pingo's posts

    Re: Any recipes to contribute?

    Granny,
    This sounds gooey and yummy to me. Once in a while it will not hurt, as long as you just have a small piece.  But are there some typing errors?

    Reading through the recipe it calls for 1 egg for the batter then later 2 eggs for the filling. But the list of ingredients calls for 2 plus 3 eggs.

    Also, are you serious of dusting with 4 cups of confectioner's sugar? Where do you put it all? Did you mean 1/4 cup?

    I do love cakes with cream cheese. I would want to make this one sometime. A dollop of whipped cream will not hurt, since we are clogging the arteries anyway. LOL

    - Pingo
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from Grannyof7. Show Grannyof7's posts

    Re: Any recipes to contribute?

    Oh My goodness - I must have had a senior moment... I went back in and added an edited version so now you can view (hopefully) a much better version.

    Thank you again for picking up so quickly on the errors in my posting. 

    Granny

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Any recipes to contribute?

    Sounds decadent and delicious! 
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from pingo. Show pingo's posts

    Re: Any recipes to contribute?

    Thanks for the update, Granny. But it still says 4 cups of confectioner's sugar. It just can't be. 1/4 cup seems more like it. ????

    In Response to Re: Any recipes to contribute?:
    Oh My goodness - I must have had a senior moment... I went back in and added an edited version so now you can view (hopefully) a much better version. Thank you again for picking up so quickly on the errors in my posting.  Granny
    Posted by Grannyof7

     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from beastsgirl. Show beastsgirl's posts

    Re: Any recipes to contribute?

    Granny, any soup recipes you can recommend for me would be great! I love ethnic foods,and most spices. I've decided that this winter I will make a pot of soup of some kind every week.bg
     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from Grannyof7. Show Grannyof7's posts

    Re: Any recipes to contribute?

    Here are two good soup recipes

    my daughter who likes to use her crockpot and ignores my way, places everything in her crockpot at once, sets it on slow when she goes to work and swears it taste great when she gets home 6 or 8 hrs later.

    She makes an exception to 'adding it all at once' when she makes the turkey soup.... and doesn't add the leftover turkey UNTIL she gets home and then lets it in the pot with the hot ingredients for about 10 minutes before eating.

    Turkey soup using leftover turkey

    2 cups turkey or chicken stock

    2-1/2 cups frozen mixed vegetables
    1 can (14-1/2 ounces) diced tomatoes, undrained3/4 cup uncooked small shell pasta

    3/4 teaspoon dried basil

    3/4 teaspoon pepper2-1/2 cups cubed cooked turkey2-1/2 teaspoons dried parsley flakes
    or chop up two tablespoons fresh parsley

    1 chopped onion

    Directions
    In a large saucepan, combine the ingredients, reserving the parsley and turkey.
     Bring to a full
    boil. Reduce heat; cover and simmer for 7-10 minutes or until the pasta and vegetables are tender. Stir in the turkey and parsley;heat through. This should be enough for 4 large bowls of soup.

    Old Fashioned Beef Stew

    2 onions, chopped
    2 cloves of garlic Smashed (put in plastic bag and hit with a rolling pin or pan until smashed out)
    6 stalks of celery, chopped 

    4 large carrots, peeled and sliced or use a bag of baby carrots since they are already 'ready to eat'.

    5 large baking potatoes, peeled and diced in large chunks
    3 lbs. of stew beef
    Flour, )see note)
    2 T. vegetable oil  plus 1 tbs. olive oil

    1 T. butter (yes, BUTTER)

    4 dashes of soy sauce
    1 full cup burgandy wine 

    3 qt. unsalted beef stock

    Salt and pepper, to taste

    4 bay leaves (remember how many you put in the pot and take them out before serving the stew)


    Cut the beef into bite-sized pieces if they look too large. 
    NOTE: Toss the beef in some flour to coat it prior to cooking 

    In a large pot, heat the oil and melt the butter. Brown the beef, stirring, add the wine,  plus 2 cup of the beef stock - bring to a boil. Reduce the heat and let meat simmer until tender, 1-1 1/2 hours - adding more water if needed so it doesn't get too concentrated..

    Then add the remaining beef stock, salt, pepper, bay leaves, celery and onions and garlic. Add the carrots and potatoes and let simmer another 20 tp 25 minutes.

    At this point taste to make sure there is enough salt and pepper in the stew...
    Let simmer for one hour. Makes 8 good sized servings.

     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from pingo. Show pingo's posts

    Re: Any recipes to contribute?

    Here is one for the bakers, that like pumpkin. I haven't made it yet (will later on today, since I already have the can of pumpkin in my pantry), but I got it from my son's website and he doesn't print anything, unless it has been tried several times. This recipe is for 4 small loaves, but I am sure one could bake it in a normal size loaf pan and just do the toothpick test.


    Pumpkin Gingerbread
    2 cups  flour, divided
    1/2 cup packed brown sugar
    2 teaspoons baking powder
    1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
    1 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
    1 cup canned pumpkin (not pie mix)
    1/2 cup molasses
    2 eggs
    1/3 cup butter
    1/4 cup milk
    1 tablespoon peeled and grated fresh ginger root or 1 teaspoon powdered ginger
    1/3 cup chopped walnuts
    2 tablespoons sugar

    Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.

    Grease the bottom and sides of four 4  1/2 – by-2  1/2- by- 1  1/2-inch loaf pans. Grease only halfway up the sides. That way the loaves will have nicely rounded tops and no unwanted rims around the edges. Set aside.

    Stir together 1 cup of the flour, the brown sugar, baking powder, cinnamon, and baking soda. Add the pumpkin, molasses, eggs, margarine or butter, and ginger root or powdered ginger. Beat with an electric mixer on low to medium speed until combined, about 30 seconds. Beat on medium to high speed for 2 minutes, scraping the sides of the bowl occasionally. Add the remaining flour; beat for 2 minutes or until mixed. Divide the batter evenly among the prepared pans.

    For a topping, stir together the walnuts and sugar; sprinkle evenly over the batter in the pans. Bake for 40 to 50 minutes or until a wooden pick inserted near the center of each loaf comes out clean. Cool the loaves in the pans on wire racks for 10 minutes. Remove the loaves from the pans. Cool thoroughly on the wire racks.

    To freeze: Wrap each loaf tightly in moisture- and vapor-proof wrap. Seal, label, and freeze for up to 6 months. To thaw, let stand, loosely covered, at room temperature for 1 hour. Or, to micro-thaw, place 1 unwrapped loaf on a microwave-safe paper towel. Cook uncovered at 30-percent power (medium-low) for 1 to 1  1/2 minutes.

    Makes 4 loaves.

    From CDKitchen for Pumpkin Gingerbread Loaves



     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from Grannyof7. Show Grannyof7's posts

    Re: Any recipes to contribute?

    Hi Pingo,

    I went back and looked at my original recipe for the gooey butter cake and yes, it does call for the 4 cups of confectioners
    sugar.  I even checked with my cousin and she gave me a good explaination.... the sugar is needed to make it 'gooey'.  So
    that is the right recipe.

    Granny
     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Any recipes to contribute?

    Maybe Pingo missed that you don't dust with the whole amount, you reserve 1 1/4 c to dust with.
     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from pingo. Show pingo's posts

    Re: Any recipes to contribute?

    Yes Kar, I certainly missed it. It wasn't in the original recipe. Thanks for enlightening me. Now I gotta try that cake - Pingo

    In Response to Re: Any recipes to contribute?:
    Maybe Pingo missed that you don't dust with the whole amount, you reserve 1 1/4 c to dust with.
    Posted by kargiver

     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from Celia2. Show Celia2's posts

    Re: Any recipes to contribute?

    Any one have a cranberry-orange-nut bread recipe that bakes up a lighter bread? The recipe I use makes a denser bread, very tasty but sometimes I wish it was a bit lighter.

    pingo - pumpkin/ginger bread came out great and tasted delicious.
     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Any recipes to contribute?

    Ah, I missed the recipe entirely before it was corrected.  1 1/4 cups seems like an awful lot to dust with, too, but better than 4 cups!
     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from pingo. Show pingo's posts

    Re: Any recipes to contribute?

    This recipe was handed down from my grandmother. Except, she fried her meatballs in plenty of butter. My mom started to bake them - so I took after her. And yes, you are reading correctly, we use soda water. The carbonation makes them lighter.
    On occasion, I found, I had a hard time to make the balls. I just added another 1 or 2 Tbs. of bread crumbs and let mixture sit for a couple of minutes to soak in the moisture.
    If I don't use all of them, I freeze them individually, then bag them. They freeze well.

    ETA: Thought I should add this. Of course I serve them with the general pasta and tomato sauce. But we also love them with a mushroom gravy and mashed potatoes.  Sauté sliced mushrooms and onions in a bit of butter. Add flour to make a roux. Then thin with chicken broth until you get the thickness of the gravy you like. Add salt and pepper and finally after done (turn off the heat) add some  sour cream. Yummy!
    Lingonberries usually accompany this, but they are hard to get by. Substitute cranberry sauce instead.

    Pingo’s Meat Balls

    1 medium onion, grated
    9 Tbs. bread crumbs (I make them from fresh bread, but the ready made crumbs will do)
    2/3 cup mixed soda water and milk (if you have no soda water, milk can be used)
    1 lbs. ground beef
    ½ lbs. ground pork
    1 egg, lightly beaten
    salt and pepper to taste
    pinch each of ground allspice and nutmeg

    Soak the breadcrumbs in the soda water. Beat the meat well with the onion and egg. Add the soaked breadcrumbs and the spices and mix well, beating until smooth.

    With wet hands make balls the size of a large walnut. Place them on a lightly greased (or use parchment paper) baking pan with a rim.

    Bake in 375 degree oven for 15 – 20 minutes.


     

     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from Grannyof7. Show Grannyof7's posts

    Re: Any recipes to contribute?

    Hi Pingo, I would never have thought to use the soda water but I made these tonight and they were GREAT!.  Did it with the mushroom gravy and mashed potatoes... my husband (who usually likes nothing new) just kept eating and eating them...couldn't get enough and then said "keep those last few for my lunch tomorrow.  Thanks for the recipe.

    Thought with the Holidays coming someone might like this recipe I have for Orange Cranberry sauce... not sure exactly where this originated but it sure it good to eat.

     Easy way to make Orange Cranberry sauce for Thanksgiving.

        Ingredients:   1 cup sugar   1/2 cup water   1/8 teaspoon ground cloves   1 cup cranberries   3 cups good-quality orange marmalade (about 2-1/2 pounds)   1/3 cup Grand Marnier (or other orange liqueur) or orange juice   3 Tablespoons grated orange peel    2 Tablespoons brandy (optional)   Preparation: 


    Cook sugar, water, and cloves in heavy small saucepan over low heat, stirring until sugar dissolves. Increase heat and bring to boil. Add cranberries. Simmer until cranberries are soft but still retain shape, stirring occasionally, about 4 minutes. Cool slightly.

    Bring marmalade, Grand Marnier, orange peel, and brandy to boil in heavy medium saucepan. Boil until mixture registers 220 degrees F. (jelly stage) on candy thermometer, stirring occasionally, about 20 minutes. Cool slightly.

    Using slotted spoon, transfer cranberries from cooking liquid to marmalade (discard the liquid). Mix gently into the marmalade, brandy and Grand Marnier mixture.. Spoon into four 1-cup jelly jars. Seal tightly. Cool completely, keep in refrigerator. 

    Makes about 4 (8-ounce) jars, I usually make one big amount for eating here on Thanksgiving and the day after ... and then make additional custard sized cups to send home with 'doggy bags' on Thanksgiving night.

    Sorry this isn't looking that good but I'm trying to copy and paste directly from my recipe file in my computer and for some reason it isn't looking right with all the differences in the background color.  Hope you can view it this way without a problem.

    Granny

          

     
     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from pingo. Show pingo's posts

    Re: Any recipes to contribute?

    Granny,
    You and I had the same for dinner last night. I am glad you and DH liked them. It is just a nice change from the usual tomato sauce. I like the tomato sauce version too, but it is always nice with a change once in a while. Especially, when you make meatballs, you usually get a lot more than two people can eat in one meal. I froze half of mine and will have them ready for another night, when I don't feel like cooking.- Pingo
     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from toytrumpet. Show toytrumpet's posts

    Re: Any recipes to contribute?

    Scrolling around and there are some wonderful sounding soup/chowder recipes in the Misc. Musings - Love Letter Recipes thread.  Give them a look/see.
     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from Grannyof7. Show Grannyof7's posts

    Re: Any recipes to contribute?

    With the Holiday now upon our doorstep, perhaps one of you would like to try this easy version of a quick Boston Cream Pie/cake.

    Enjoy, Granny

    Boston Cream Pie/Cake,
    Easy recipe 

    1 package yellow cake mix
    1/2 cup melted margarine
    3 large eggs (not the jumbo size) 
    3/4 cup water minus 1/4 teas.
    1/4 teaspoon of butter flavoring

    Filling:
    2 (4-ounce) packages regular not the instant
    vanilla pudding
    4 cups milk

    Glaze:
    2 squares (1-ounce each) unsweetened chocolate
    2 tablespoon margarine
    4-or more if needed tablespoons water
    2 cup powdered sugar
    2 teaspoon vanilla


    Preheat oven to 350°.

    In 13"x9"" pan, combine 2 cups dry cake mix and melted margarine; mix until crumbly. Press into pan.
    In large saucepan, combine pudding mix and milk, and cook as directed on pudding package. Pour pudding over cake mix in pan. Combine rest of dry cake mix, eggs and water until moistened, beat as directed on cake package; pour over filling.

    Bake 30 - 35 minutes, or until top springs back when lightly touched. Cool.

    In small saucepan, combine first 3 glaze ingredients, heating until melted.
    Beat in sugar and vanilla until smooth.

    Immediately spread over cake.

    Refrigerate at least 1 hour before cutting.

    Note: this does make a lot of frosting but you can always cut recipe in half regarding the frosting amounts if you want less frosting.

     
  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from romanticf16. Show romanticf16's posts

    Re: Any recipes to contribute?

    In Response to Re: Any recipes to contribute?:
     "Lingonberries usually accompany this, but they are hard to get by." 
    Posted by pingo

    Lingonberry Preserves are sold at IKEA stores, and should be available mail order via their online catalog FYI.
     
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