Middle Eastern

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from dog-lady. Show dog-lady's posts

    Middle Eastern

    http://www.amazon.com/Simply-Armenian-Naturally-Healthy-Cooking/dp/1931834067/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1332333600&sr=1-1      I recommend this cookbook if you like ethnic dishes!    One of my favorites page 113,   Bulgur Stew with Chickpeas (vegetarian).
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from GoneToTheDogs39. Show GoneToTheDogs39's posts

    Re: Middle Eastern

          Bulgur Stew with Chickpeas    
                serves 8

    This hearty vegetarian stew will take the chill out of the bitterest winter day.

      3 tablespoons olive oil
     1 1/4 cup course-grain bulgur
    1 medium onion, finely chopped
    1-2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
          3 celery stalks, diced
    2 cans (14 ounces) tomatoes, peeled and diced
           1 1/2 cups of cold water
    2 cans (14 ounces) chickpeas, drained and rinsed
           1 teaspoon sugar
       1/2 teaspoon cumin
             1/8 teaspoon cayenne
      1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
              1 teaspoon salt

    1.   Heat the oil in a large saucepan.  Add the bulgur, onion, and garlic and sauté for 5 minutes over medium-high heat,  stirring frequently.  Add the celery and cook for a few more minutes.

    2.   Add the tomatoes, water, chickpeas, sugar, cumin, peppers, and salt.  Stir well. Cover and simmer, stirring occasionally, until most of the liquid has been absorbed, about 20-25 minutes.  The bulgur will be plump and tender when  the stew is done.

    3.   Serve warm with a delicious flatbread and a slice of cheese.

    Above recipe is from the cookbook provided in this link   http://www.amazon.com/Simply-Armenian-Naturally-Healthy-Cooking/dp/1931834067/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1332333600&sr=1-1 
     
    PS:  You can use fresh chickpeas instead of canned, 1 cup dry,  cooked and soft seems to work. 
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from pingo. Show pingo's posts

    Re: Middle Eastern

    Robin, that sounds like a good dish our family will enjoy on a cold winter day. Thanks!
    Do you own a slow cooker? It is really easy to cook any kind of beans in it. Just add the rinsed beans covering them with water plus 2 inches. No salt. Start them on low, when you go to bed and you will have nice home cooked beans w/o any preservatives, when you wake up (assuming you sleep 8 - 10 hours). You can also start them in the morning of course and they will be ready, when you get  home from work.
    I usually cook one or two lbs. at the time. Then freeze leftovers in smaller portions flat in zip lock bags. No need to buy canned beans. - Pingo

    In Response to Re: Middle Eastern:
          Bulgur Stew with Chickpeas                 serves 8 This hearty vegetarian stew will take the chill out of the bitterest winter day.   3 tablespoons olive oil  1 1/4 cup course-grain bulgur 1 medium onion, finely chopped 1-2 cloves garlic, finely chopped       3 celery stalks, diced 2 cans (14 ounces) tomatoes, peeled and diced        1 1/2 cups of cold water 2 cans (14 ounces) chickpeas, drained and rinseed        1 teaspoon sugar    1/2 teaspoon cumin          1/8 teaspoon cayenne   1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper           1 teaspoon salt 1.   Heat the oil in a large saucepan.  Add the bulgur, onion, and garlic and sauté for 5 minutes over medium-high heat,  stirring frequently.  Add the celery and cook for a few more minutes. 2.   Add the tomatoes, water, chickpeas, sugar, cumin, peppers, and salt.  Stir well. Cover and simmer, stirring occasionally, until most of the liquid has been absorbed, about 20-25 minutes.  The bulgur will be plump and tender whe  the stew is done. 3.   Serve warm with a delicious flatbread and a slice of cheese. PS:  You can use fresh chickpeas instead of canned, 1 cup dry,  cooked and soft seems to work.  I also add more water and leave out the sugar and salt.
    Posted by Robin39

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from GoneToTheDogs39. Show GoneToTheDogs39's posts

    Re: Middle Eastern

    Rice-Stuffed Grape Leaves

    My stuffed grape leaves, called yalanchi in Turkish, are tarter and lighter-tasting than most recipes. The secret is to use slightly less olive oil and a lot more lemon juice.

          My mother-in-law taught me to line the pot with carrot strips.  Carrots add a subtle sweetness to the stuffed leaves, and once cooked, make a delicious bonus dish.

         Serve stuffed grape leaves when entertaining large numbers of family and friends.  They are also an important no-meat Lenten dish.

                 100 grape leaves, 4 bundles of small-sized leaves (page 28)
                                 1 1/4 cups olive oil
                                   1/4 cup water
                           8 large onions, chopped
                1 1/2 cups short-grain white rice or medium-grain bulgur
                         2 bunches fresh flat-leaf parsley, finely chopped
                                          2 teaspoons salt
                                   2 tablespoons tomato paste
                                            1 tablespoon sugar
                                  1 teaspoon ground black pepper
                   2-3 tablespoons snipped fresh dill
                              2 tablespoons dried mint
                                     Juice of 4 lemons
                    2-4 carrots, cut into long strips
                       2-3 lemons, cut in wedges
                       Fresh flat-leaf parsley sprigs

    1)  If using store-bought leaves, rinse them several times in water, draining each time.  If using fresh or frozen grape leaves, plunge leaves in boiling salted water until the color darkens to olive, about 1 minute.
    Remove immediately, rinse with cold water, and drain.

    2)   Heat the olive oil and water in a large , deep-sided skillet. Add the onions and cook over medium-low heat until tender, about 30 minutes. Add the rice, parsley, and salt.  Cover and simmer about 15 minutes.

    3)   Meanwhile, combine the tomato paste, sugar, black pepper, dill, 1 tablespoon dried mint, and juice from 3 of the lemons in a bowl. Stir  into the rice, cover, and simmer another 10 minutes (generally not necessary when using bulgur). Remove from heat.

    4)   Line the bottom of a large pot with grape leaves.  Arrange the carrot strips lengthwise over the grape leaves across the bottom of the pot.

    5)   Taking one grape leave at a time, trim the stem to a stub, if necessary. Place the leaf in the center of a small plate or work surface, vein side up, stem-end pointed down (towards you).  Place a spoonful of rice stuffing into the center of the leaf.  Fold the bottom up over the stuffing and the sides in toward the center and roll upward (away from you).  Roll snugly.  The rolled leaf will resemble a small hot dog.

    6)   As each leaf is rolled, arrange it in the pot on top of the carrot strips.  After all the leaves are rolled, set a dinner plate, bottom-side up, on top of the pile of rolled grape leaves. This will secure them in place during the cooking.

    7)   Bring 3 cups of water, the remaining mint, and the juice from the lemon to a boil in a different pot.  When boiling, pour the liquid into the pot holding the stuffed grape leaves.  Cover, and bring the liquid quickly back to a boil over high heat.  Lower the heat and simmer, covered, until grape leaves are tender.  This may take as little as 30 minutes if you used fresh leaves to as long as 1 hour if you used store-bought leaves, which can be thick and tough.

    8)   Remove from heat. Pour off excess water immediately. Let cool in the pot, still covered with the dinner plate, for at least 30 minutes before removing the stuffed leaves to a serving platter.

    9)   Garnish with cooked carrot strips, lemon wedges, and parsley.  Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate until serving.  Traditionally, stuffed grape leaves are served lightly chilled or at room temperature as an appetizer.
    You can also serve them hot with a dollop of cool plain yogurt on top.
    This party-sized recipe yields enough to experiment.
        
    http://www.amazon.com/Simply-Armenian-Naturally-Healthy-Cooking/dp/1931834067/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1332333600&sr=1-1
             This recipe is from the cookbook the above link will take you to.
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from GoneToTheDogs39. Show GoneToTheDogs39's posts

    Re: Middle Eastern



    Tomato and Bulgur Soup
              Serves 4       


    My husband calls this the "healing soup" because his father requested it whenever he was feeling a bit under the weather.  This home remedy may not be a medically proven cure, but its rich, hearty flavor and wholesome warmth will improve your spirits.

                             6 cups chicken broth   (fresh homemade is better IMO)
                        1/2 onion, very finely chopped
                              2 tablespoons olive oil
                     1 can (6 ounces) tomato paste (about 3/4 cup)
                                    1 cup fine-grain bulgur
                                         1 teaspoon salt
                              3/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
                                                  1 lemon

    1)  Bring broth to a boil over moderate-high heat in a large pot.

    2)  Meanwhile, sauté the onion in the olive oil in a small saucepan over      moderate heat until tender and slightly golden brown, about 10 minutes.

    3)  Add the tomato paste to the boiling broth. Stir until the paste is   distributed evenly before adding the bulgur, salt, and pepper. Stir to combine, then add the cooked onion. Cover, lower heat, and simmer for 10 minutes.

    4)  Serve individually in bowls with a squeeze of fresh lemon.


    http://www.amazon.com/Simply-Armenian-Naturally-Healthy-Cooking/dp/1931834067/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1332333600&sr=1-1
      
    If you want more, buy the book!





     
                      



                         

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from GoneToTheDogs39. Show GoneToTheDogs39's posts

    Re: Middle Eastern

    Okay, just one more recipe

    Artichokes Stuffed with Ground Lamb

    This is one of the tastiest dishes in the collection.  During baking, the natural meat juices tenderize the artichoke leaves,  transforming them into buttery delicacies.

                    4 large artichokes
                    Juice of 2 lemons
                  3/4 pound of ground lamb
                1 medium onion, chopped
             1 tablespoon chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley
           1 tablespoon chopped Toasted Pine Nuts (page 43)
                         1/4 teaspoon ground cumin
                             1/2 teaspoon salt
                      1/4 teaspoon ground pepper
                                       1 large egg
                1 medium-sized tomato, sliced into 4 slices
                                       2 cups water

    1)  Cut off artichoke tops, leaving two-thirds of the heart and bottom.  Scoop out inside leaves and fuzzy choke.  Immediately squeeze juice from 1 of the lemons into the empty artichoke to prevent discoloring.

    2)   Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

    3)  In a large skillet,  fry the lamb with the onions over moderate heat until the meat is browned and the onions tender, about 10 minutes.

    4)  Stir in the parsley, pine nuts, cumin, salt, and pepper.

    5)  Transfer to a mixing bowl.  Add the egg, mixing well.  The egg will help hold the stuffing mixture together.

    6)  Fill the center of each artichoke with stuffing and place them in a deep-sided baking pan or casserole dish.  Cover each with 1 slice of tomato.

    7)  Once the stuffed artichokes are arranged, add the water and the juice from the remaining lemon to the pan.  Cover and bake for 1 1/2 hours.

    8)  Serve hot with pilaf for a complete meal.

     http://www.amazon.com/Simply-Armenian-Naturally-Healthy-Cooking/dp/1931834067/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1332333600&sr=1-1
     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from GoneToTheDogs39. Show GoneToTheDogs39's posts

    Re: Middle Eastern

     Since these recipes are so appreciated.  NOT!  Here's another one.

    Red Lentil Soup
       Vospov Abour
            Serves 8
       

    This soup is an old-time favorite made in some version by just about every nationality of cooks from the Middle East.  Red lentils are light and cook quickly, so it is a particularly good soup to be able to pull out of your chef's hat year-round.

                    1 garlic clove, minced
                1 small onion, finely chopped
                      3 tablespoons olive oil
          2 cups red lentils, picked clean of debris and rinsed
                   5 cups chicken or vegetable broth
                      1/2 teaspoon ground cardamom
                                 1/2 teaspoon salt


    1)  In a skillet, sauté the garlic and onion in the olive oil over moderate heat until the onions are tender, about 10 minutes.

    2)  Place the lentils in a large pot.  Add the onion mixture, the broth, cardamom, and salt.  Bring the soup to a boil; reduce heat, cover, and simmer until the lentils become soft and mushy, about 45 minutes.  When done, the soup will be golden yellow and the lentils will have broken up so that individual lentils are rare.

    3)  Traditionally served warm topped with Toasted Pita Chips (page 191).

    From the cookbook: http://www.amazon.com/Simply-Armenian-Naturally-Healthy-Cooking/dp/1931834067/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1332333600&sr=1-1

     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from GoneToTheDogs39. Show GoneToTheDogs39's posts

    Re: Middle Eastern

    Lentil and Swiss Chard Soup
            Serves 4

    Midwinter is the season for hearty soups and home-baked breads.  A thick slice of Cracked Wheat Bread (page 199) with a bowl of this soup is truly satisfying.

       1 1/2 cups brown lentils, picked clean of debris and rinsed
    10 leaves Swiss chard, washed, stems removed and discarded
                    1/4 cup of olive oil
            1 large onion, finely chopped
           1 large clove garlic, finely chopped
          1/4 cup chopped flat-leaf parsley
                         1 teaspoon salt
            1/2 teaspoon black pepper
                            Juice of 2 lemons

    1)  Place the lentils in a large pot with 6 cups of cold water.  Bring to a boil, skimming off any foam that emerges, than cover and simmer gently for 1 hour or until lentils are soft but not mushy.

    2)  Slit the Swiss chard leaves down the middle and chop coarsely.  The taste is the same whether you use red or green chard.  I love colorful food, so I use a combination of both.

    3)  Heat the olive oil in a large deep-skillet; add the onion and garlic and sauté gently until the onion is tender and transparent, about 10 minutes.  Add the shredded chard leaves.  Stirring frequently, cook until leaves wilt, about 5 minutes.

    4)  Pour the skillet mixture into the lentils.  Add the parsley, salt, pepper, and lemon juice.  Cover and simmer gently for 15 minutes.

    5)  Serve with extra lemon wedges, if desired, and hearty slices of bread and cheese to complete the meal.

    From the cookbook: http://www.amazon.com/Simply-Armenian-Naturally-Healthy-Cooking/dp/1931834067/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1332333600&sr=1-1
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from GoneToTheDogs39. Show GoneToTheDogs39's posts

    Re: Middle Eastern

    Chilled Yogurt Soup with Cucumbers   
            Jajek
           Serves 2

    Beat the heat on a hot summer day with this super-simple, no-cook, thirst-quenching, yogurt-based soup.  Second only to pilaf, jajek is an Armenian staple.
                            
                                 1 large firm cucumber, peeled
                                          1 cup plain yogurt
                                            1/2 teaspoon salt
                          1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh mint
                              1 cup ice cold water (see Note)

    1)  Cut the cucumber in half lengthwise.  Remove and discard seeds.  Cut each lengthwise again, then dice each section into small pieces, the tinier the tastier.

    2)  Combine the chopped cucumber, yogurt, salt, mint, and water in a ceramic or glass bowl.  Mix well  Cover and chill.

    3)  Feast on an individual serving of this delicious soup.

    Note:  For a special treat, omit the water, spoon over pilaf, grilled lamb, or rounds of grilled eggplant as a condiment.

    From the cookbook: http://www.amazon.com/Simply-Armenian-Naturally-Healthy-Cooking/dp/1931834067/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1332333600&sr=1-1
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from GoneToTheDogs39. Show GoneToTheDogs39's posts

    Re: Middle Eastern

    Rice Pilaf 
    Serves 4

         1 nest fine curly vermicelli
            1 tablespoon butter
          1 1/2 cups chicken broth
        1 cup long-grain white rice

    1)  Break the vermicelli nest into small pieces with your hands into a small (1 quart) saucepan.  Add the butter.  Over low heat, stirring constantly, cook the vermicelli until just golden.  Once it begins to brown, it will brown quickly, so be careful not to burn it.  Remove from heat.

    2)  In a separate saucepan, bring the broth to a boil.

    3)  Pour the boiling broth into the saucepan with the browned vermicelli.
    Add the rice, and give the pot one big stir.  Cover and simmer over moderate to low heat until the broth is absorbed, about 14 minutes.

    4)  Let stand, covered, 5 minutes before serving.

     Taken from the cookbook mentioned in my previous posts,  some omissions regarding the brands of products recommended to use.
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from GoneToTheDogs39. Show GoneToTheDogs39's posts

    Re: Middle Eastern

    Paklava
    Makes 24

    End any meal with a small diamond of light, not-too-sweet, layered pastry called paklava.  (Baklava is the Greek name.)  It is one of the simplest desserts to make...yet everyone feels special because you did.

                      The Syrup
                       1 1/3 cups of sugar
                           1 cup water
                        Juice of 1/2 lemon

                      The Pastry
              2 1/2 cups walnuts, finely chopped
                      1 tablespoon sugar
                  1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
            1/2 pound (2 sticks) unsalted butter, clarified (page 230)
                1 package phyllo dough (see Glossary, page 284)

    1)  It's important to make the syrup first, so it can cool completely before it's poured over the hot pastry.  Combine the sugar and water in a small saucepan and bring to a boil.  Reduce the heat and simmer until the syrup thickens, about 15 minutes.  Remove from heat, stir in the lemon juice, and set aside to cool.

    2)  Combine the walnuts, sugar, and cinnamon in a bowl.  Set aside

    3)  Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.

    4)  Melt the clarified butter in a small bowl.

    5)  Remove the phyllo dough from its packaging.  Cover immediately with 2 overlapping sheets of plastic wrap and a clean, slightly moistened kitchen towel to prevent the dough from drying before use.

    6)  Brush the bottom of the baking tray with butter.  Working quickly, place 1 sheet of phyllo dough so that it fits the tray or is centered on the tray.
    Brush the top with butter.  Repeat this process until 10 sheets of phyllo are layered in the pan.

    7)  Spread the nut mixture evenly over the top.  Continue layering the dough as before until the remaining 10 layers are used.  Brush the top with any remaining butter.

    8)  Carefully cut into diamond shapes with a sharp knife.  Bake in the middle of the oven for 30 to 45 minutes.  (Baking times will vary according to your oven and the thickness of the baking sheet you use.  I recommend that the first time you make this delicate pastry, you set your timer for 30 minutes to check the pastry's progress.  Continue baking until the top is crispy and an appetizing golden brown color.)

    9)  Remove from the oven and immediately pour the syrup evenly over the top.  It's normal to hear a sizzling sound when the cool syrup hits the hot tray.

    10)  Cool completely before serving.  Be a culinary hero bring a tray of homemade paklava to any gathering. 

    From the cookbook: http://www.amazon.com/Simply-Armenian-Naturally-Healthy-Cooking/dp/1931834067/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1332333600&sr=1-1

    PS:  Instead of going through all the above, just cruise over to Watertown Square and pick up some nice pastry from one of the many Middle Eastern bakeries there!
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from melody135. Show melody135's posts

    Re: Middle Eastern

    The recipe looks great! I will definitely try this.
     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from Rosa-rugosa. Show Rosa-rugosa's posts

    Re: Middle Eastern

    In response to RockinRobin39's comment:

    Lentil and Swiss Chard Soup 

    From the cookbook: http://www.amazon.com/Simply-Armenian-Naturally-Healthy-Cooking/dp/1931834067/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1332333600&sr=1-1



    I tried this recipe last weekend, excellent!  Thanks for posting it.

     

     
Sections
Shortcuts

Share