What are they called?

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from RogerTaylor. Show RogerTaylor's posts

    What are they called?

    I have a family recipe of a fried potato but I don't know what they are called. This recipe comes from the Italian side of my family.....

    They consist of boiled potatoes cooled to room temperature, crumbled (not mashed!) with a fork adding add some egg (scrambled) parsley and Romano cheese. Combine all, mold into a flattened ball - the size of a baked potatoe - roll in flour.  Fry in hot vegetable oil on both sides compliment with butter and lemon juice.

    What are they called? I can't be the only one that makes them? They have to have a name!

    anyone?......anyone?????

    Thanks!

    ....and "yes" I do expect the response to my question to be..."fattening!"
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from reindeergirl. Show reindeergirl's posts

    Re: What are they called?

    Ooh la la, RT, that sounds delicious!
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from reindeergirl. Show reindeergirl's posts

    Re: What are they called?

    Cazzilli?
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: What are they called?

    Tocchetti ("cubed potatoes" in Italian)?  
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from RogerTaylor. Show RogerTaylor's posts

    Re: What are they called?

    Not sure Kar....same recipe? Undecided
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: What are they called?

    I found the photo in google/images, and I didn't see a recipe with it - do those look like yours?  I googled "tocchetti," but it seems to be something that doesn't have a universal recipe.
     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from RogerTaylor. Show RogerTaylor's posts

    Re: What are they called?

    In Response to Re: What are they called?:
    [QUOTE]I found the photo in google/images, and I didn't see a recipe with it - do those look like yours?  I googled "tocchetti," but it seems to be something that doesn't have a universal recipe.
    Posted by kargiver[/QUOTE]

    No, they don't look like the ones I make, those look deep fried....but that could be just a minor difference.  The egg and cheese form an outer crust when fried...

    Here's the recipe I found for tocchetti's....they call them dumplings??

    http://www.italian-food-recipes.net/2010/03/tocchetti-with-asiago-primo.html

    This is one of the only recipes I have from my Grandmother (from Italy via Ellis Island) and Mother I know...I can't even write down the measurements of the ingrediants because it's done by site.  My kids love them with breaded fried veal and broccoli - their Christmas dinner request this year!  I don't make this meal more than once or twice a year - I stay away from fried foods!  My mother doesn't know the name either which I think is kind of funny.  I'm thinking I'm going to have to settle for what my kid's call them....."Italian Potatoes"....

    I may send an E-mail to the Globe directly let them figure it out....
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from RogerTaylor. Show RogerTaylor's posts

    Re: What are they called?

    This is the closest I could find....looks like Grandma left out the rolling in bread crumbs and mozzarella.....I'll have to try this recipe some time!


    http://www.italian-food-recipes.net/2007/03/croquettes-of-potatoes-secondo.html
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: What are they called?

    I thought of croquettes at first, but those are all made with whipped potato to my knowledge.  I don't think there's any such thing as a chunky croquette.

    I think it's a variation of Tocchetti because it translates to "cubed potatoes," a  hallmark of your family's tradtional recipe.
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from plasko. Show plasko's posts

    Re: What are they called?

    Sounds a bit like a hash-brown, or potatoe fritter.
    However, at the Italian festival of Saint-whoever in Little Italy in Boston North End there were loads of street stalls selling something like what you describe except the ball was not flattened, but remained spherical. There were even a choice of fillings. but those ones were fried. Tasted absolutely gross, mind you and cost like $5 each (rip-off to be expected in tourist areas, I know).
    Maybe someone from the North-End will know the name?
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from RogerTaylor. Show RogerTaylor's posts

    Re: What are they called?

    So, as an Italian I have a nasty habit of making too much food (if your Italian you know what I mean) especially mashed potatoes.  I usually toss the left overs. Last time I saved the left over mashed potatoes and tried a few things based on this recipe:

                      


    http://www.italian-food-recipes.net/2007/03/croquettes-of-potatoes-secondo.html


    1. Rolled into golf ball size then flattened them to about 1/2 inch, rolled in egg white then into seasoned bread crumbs.  I then pan fried them in vegetable oil.  The result was a crisp outer coat with steaming hot mashed potatoes in the middle. Kind of a "bland" taste.

    2. Same as above - but baked at 425 degrees for 8 minutes each side. Same texture result but much more flavor, you could taste the Italian bread crumbs.

    3. Same as above (2) - but I added kosher salt and grated Romano cheese and shredded Italian cheese blend in the middle of the potatoes. Same as #2 but with more flavor - no need for the shredded cheese, it just melted into the potato and didn't add to the flavor.

    ....I won't toss the left over mashed potatoes again! Laughing

     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from cb156. Show cb156's posts

    Re: What are they called?

    RT--I asked a friend of mine who was raised in Sardinia, and teaches Italian.
    This was the response I got:
    Il nome della ricetta e`" Braciole di Patate" ed e` una specialita` della Calabria. Generalmente pero` hanno la forma di una polpetta.

    So, "Braciole di Patate", although they are generally shaped like meatballs.
    Hope that helps!
     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from RogerTaylor. Show RogerTaylor's posts

    Re: What are they called?

    The English translation being.....

    "The name of the recipe and the " Chops Potatoes" and is a specialty of the region of Calabria. However, it is generally in the form of a chalice."

    Thank you cb156! A curious name to say the least...gotta love the internet!

     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: What are they called?

    You usually toss leftover mashed potatoes?  You know you can just reheat them, right?  Leftover mashed potatoes are better than the day you make them...imo.
     

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