"Ask an Expert?" on health/evironmental issues

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from JAR-VT. Show JAR-VT's posts

    "Ask an Expert?" on health/evironmental issues

    I wish we had a Meredith Goldstein for health questions. Here's mine and perhaps no definitive answer exists for it:

    I eat lots of fruits and vegetables. If organic is available and not excessively priced more than conventional (ie. a dollar more rather than double), I will always choose organic for my fruits and veggies. However, I eat mostly conventional produce when it comes right down to it and go with sale items. My question is: am I at higher risk and increased health problems due to my increased exposure to pesticides, more so than your average eater? Or will my overall health be better due to my increased fruit and veggie consumption?

    Thoughts? Or anybody know of a professional I can ask?
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from dog-lady. Show dog-lady's posts

    Re: "Ask an Expert?" on health/evironmental issues

    I  do the same thing (so far so good).  I think it is more important to avoid junk, like cake, muffins, donuts, fritos, concentrated sweets, than to worry about the miniscule amount of pesticides used.  Avoid excessive salt, packaged, prepared and canned foods, crackers etc tend to have msg (high sodium), take it easy with red meat, fried foods, butter.  Of course anything you drench in butter and salt is going to taste wonderful!  You have to get used to the way stuff tastes without it.  When you eat out at restaurants, all bets are off! Move as much as you can and keep your weight down, don't overindulge in alcohol, sleep at night and keep stress to a minimum!   The genetic predispositions we can't control.   Stay away from artificial sweeteners (stevia included), colas, chemicals...you get the idea. Do some form of exercise for at least one hour a day, besides walking.  In my opinion you are better off by eating a lot of veggies and fruits, even if they're not always organic.  In fact, I've been eating more frozen veggies and fruits lately, no sugar added of course! PS: The frozen blueberries aren't bad at all!   Recent article from the Mayo Clinic    http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/organic-food/NU00255    (I am not an expert in nutrition, but I work in healthcare and have been on the planet a long time)
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: "Ask an Expert?" on health/evironmental issues

    Wash your produce really well with a commercial or homemade wash that dissolves waxes (and anything trapped in them) and pesticides, and they'll be clean of pesticides.  Actually, you should wash organic stuff really well, too, because we all know what organic fertilizer consists of.  But, as far as pesticides go, if they are clean they are clean no matter what was on them.

    The other thing to be concerned about, though, regarding organic vs non-organic is genetically modified food (GMO). Corn, soy, and wheat are ones that are widely modified, and a lot of people can't digest them well, anymore, in their current pest-free, long shelf-life genetic state.  If you're having problems digesting these things you'd probably do better with the more expensive non-GMO versions which USDA Organic is.

    I think you'd get a lot out of the documentary "The Future of Food."  It's on Netflix among other sources.
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from dog-lady. Show dog-lady's posts

    Re: "Ask an Expert?" on health/evironmental issues

    But the pesticide/fertilizer applied on the ground and plant, goes into the root and gets into the internal part of the plant, so no amount of washing will remove it anyway.  There will always be trace amounts, at the least.
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: "Ask an Expert?" on health/evironmental issues

    In Response to Re: "Ask an Expert?" on health/evironmental issues:
    [QUOTE]But the pesticide/fertilizer applied on the ground and plant, goes into the root and gets into the internal part of the plant, so no amount of washing will remove it anyway.  There will always be trace amounts, at the least.
    Posted by dog-lady[/QUOTE]

    Totally true.  But, consider that breathing puts chemicals in your bloodstream via your lungs so you can't avoid all toxins, anyway.  Well-washed fruits and vegetables with those trace amonts are as safe as things get today.  You'd have to live in a hermetically sealed bubble to avoid all toxins.
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from JAR-VT. Show JAR-VT's posts

    Re: "Ask an Expert?" on health/evironmental issues

    Dog-lady's point is my concern. For example, we never heard the upshot of the arsenic in apples...so many of our foods are still growing in heavy medal laden soils, regardless of increased pesticide safety (or even growing organic). I avoid apples coming from China at the very least!

    Somebody told me to at least avoid the "dirty dozen" of pesticide laden foods.
     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from dog-lady. Show dog-lady's posts

    Re: "Ask an Expert?" on health/evironmental issues

    In Response to Re: "Ask an Expert?" on health/evironmental issues:
    [QUOTE] Somebody told me to at least avoid the "dirty dozen" of pesticide laden foods.
    Posted by JAR-VT[/QUOTE]

    Could you share that?   The "dirty dozen" pesticide laden foods.   Thanks.
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: "Ask an Expert?" on health/evironmental issues

    I think the only way you can really know exactly what you're eating and be sure it's safe is to grow your own from organic seeds.  We grow a lot, but we aren't self sufficent year 'round yet, unfortunately.  We're working on that, though.

    I saw the "dirty dozen" on TV, and all I can remember is celery.  Oh, wait, here it is, Dirty Dozen: 12 Foods to eat Organic
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from RedFishBlueFish. Show RedFishBlueFish's posts

    Re: "Ask an Expert?" on health/evironmental issues

    You can also be "too organic" in some ways.

    See the third question down in Dear Prudie's chat.

    Seriously, though, you are probably better off than the "average" eater simply because a diet heavily based on whole foods like fruits and vegetables is healthier than the processed junk so prevalent in the American diet. The trace amounts of pesticides can't be much worse than the chemicals used to make Twinkies appear baked.
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: "Ask an Expert?" on health/evironmental issues

    Just saw a trailer for a news report on WBZ tonight at 11 that deals with this exact issue.
     

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