Generic Drugs vs Brand Names

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from GoneToTheDogs39. Show GoneToTheDogs39's posts

    Generic Drugs vs Brand Names

    "About 80 percent of all U.S. prescriptions are filled with generics, according to healthcare information provider IMS Health. When a doctor prescribes a brand-name drug, state laws allow pharmacists to automatically substitute the cheaper generic version in filling the prescription. Bartlett's doctor prescribed the brand-name Clinoril, and her pharmacist filled it with the generic sulindac."  (excerpt from article below)

    Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/health/2013/03/18/top-court-to-hear-arguments-over-generic-drugmaker-liability/#ixzz2O1qUTPKY

    "I think generic drugs should be held accountable for the harm they do to people, just like brand-name drugs should be"

    Avatar from "The Artwork of Catherine Darling Hostetter" 

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from miscricket. Show miscricket's posts

    Re: Generic Drugs vs Brand Names

    I agree. I think if a generic drug company is making a profit off of a product they are selling to consumers then they should assume the risk when something goes wrong.

     
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    Re: Generic Drugs vs Brand Names

    Summary:

    1. Ibuprofen is a generic drug while Motrin is a branded drug.
    2. Ibuprofen is cheaper than Motrin.
    3. Motrin has more forms of availability than ibuprofen such as syrups, capsules, tablets, and chewable forms.
    4. Both drugs are indicated for mild pain and fever.



    Read more: Difference Between Motrin and Ibuprofen | Difference Between | Motrin vs Ibuprofen http://www.differencebetween.net/science/health/drugs-health/difference-between-motrin-and-ibuprofen/#ixzz2OZSb6whr

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Generic Drugs vs Brand Names

    This is marginally off topic and purely anecdotal, but I have my misgivings about generic drugs based on something we experienced many times over through my grandmother.  My mother got Gramma's drugs from the pharmacy and metered them out so my grandmother was none the wiser (not on purpose just as a matter of circumstance) if she was getting the generic or name brand.  Regardless of the medication, she never failed to feel the difference saying something like, "I think I got a bad batch of these," not knowing that it was the first pill of a new bottle of something we'd just switched to the generic.  She could FEEL the difference either in side effects or efficacy; there was no other explanation unless she had some kind of freakish ESP.  (Which, is another story altogether...for another day.)  It happened again and again over the years with different drug pairs.  So, as nutty as it might be to base any of my beliefs on purely anecdotal evidence I don't trust the generics to be exactly the same thing as their more expensive brethren and tend to avoid them.

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from GoneToTheDogs39. Show GoneToTheDogs39's posts

    Re: Generic Drugs vs Brand Names

    Back in the mid 90s, a dr I know prescribed a med for a pt and checked off the generic option.

    Well, this client voiced concerns that the generic med would not be the same as the brand name that she had positive results with and she wanted the brand name.

     He ignored her and made a comment that the taxpayers were paying for her meds, he insisted that the generic drug was the correct choice for her.

    She filed a complaint as she felt she was being discriminated against because she was on public assistance... she won.

    The dr was reprimanded.

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Generic Drugs vs Brand Names

    In response to WhatDoYouWantNow's comment:

    In response to kargiver's comment:

    there was no other explanation unless she had some kind of freakish ESP.



    Actually, I believe there is an FDA rule that allows generics to be within 20% off their stated dosage, at least for over the counter drugs. I'm not entirely sure whether that or another similar rule applies to scheduled prescription drugs, but it is something to look into for anyone interested.

     

     

     



    I just saw this...wow.  Now, that would explain it.  I'd bet anything the same thing is true for prescriptions...she could tell the difference - how else could it be?

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from GoneToTheDogs39. Show GoneToTheDogs39's posts

    Re: Generic Drugs vs Brand Names

    Also,  the ingredients used for the coating can be different (generic),  this may affect the absorbtion and overall performance of the drug, so, often it depends on the medication.

    I have no problem purchasing something like generic aspirin, but for a serious medical condition, I would prefer to have brand name, if possible.

     

     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from miscricket. Show miscricket's posts

    Re: Generic Drugs vs Brand Names

    In response to WhatDoYouWantNow's comment:

    In response to kargiver's comment:

     

    In response to WhatDoYouWantNow's comment:

     

    In response to kargiver's comment:

    there was no other explanation unless she had some kind of freakish ESP.



    Actually, I believe there is an FDA rule that allows generics to be within 20% off their stated dosage, at least for over the counter drugs. I'm not entirely sure whether that or another similar rule applies to scheduled prescription drugs, but it is something to look into for anyone interested.

     

     

     

     



    I just saw this...wow.  Now, thatwould explain it.  I'd bet anything the same thing is true for prescriptions...she could tell the difference - how else could it be?

     



    The funny thing is this: My memory is that it is true for prescriptions.

     

    But I have to wonder about whether my memory is right. There are some prescription drugs with a pretty narrow range of safety where having 20% too much or too little might become a significant problem (psychiatric meds; high-potency painkillers, anti-psychotics)




    That's actually kind of interesting and something I never realized. I had a sort of opposite issue with regards to a prescription medication I take. The brand name gave me awful side effects. Pharmacists must know about this since my pharmacist told me to have my Dr. change my prescription to the generic. I did..and the side effects subsided.

     

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Generic Drugs vs Brand Names

    Huh, that sounds like more evidence that there's less of the active ingredient.  My grandmother noticed they didn't work as well, you notice fewer side effects, miscricket.  So much for the idea that they are "exactly the same."  

     

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