statins and side effects, an alternative treatment

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from GoneToTheDogs39. Show GoneToTheDogs39's posts

    statins and side effects, an alternative treatment

       Did my own research,  read books by Robert Kowalski...."The 8-Week Cholesterol Cure"   started taking EndurActin 500 mg [long acting] twice a day with effective results and no side effects.   Initially they  do lab work every few months to make sure you don't have elevated LFT's [liver function tests], also Niacin can cause  glucose levels to rise in some people.     Diet will only do so much,  some people just make too much cholesterol in the liver, tends to be genetic.   www.endur.com
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from AppDev. Show AppDev's posts

    Re: statins and side effects, an alternative treatment

    EndurActin is an over-the-counter remedy that mainly depends on large doses of the B-vitamin, niacin. Niacin has long been known to reduce blood lipids somewhat. However, many people do not respond, while others experience flushing or other side-effects. Another over-the-counter is the Chinese condiment red yeast rice, which is fermented with Monascus purpureus. It contains small amounts of lovastatin and is effective for some people, but for others it can provoke nausea or other side-effects. There is no all-purpose, hazard-free treatment.

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from dog-lady. Show dog-lady's posts

    Re: statins and side effects, an alternative treatment

    Statins May Raise Diabetes Risk in Older Women

    Study: Middle-Aged, Older Statin Users Had More Type 2 Diabetes

    By Salynn Boyles
    WebMD Health News

    Reviewed by Brunilda Nazario, MD

    Jan. 9, 2012 -- Use of cholesterol-lowering statin drugs may be associated with an increased risk of diabetes in middle-aged and older women, a new study suggests.

    Experts say the evidence as a whole suggests that the risks are slight and that for most women who take statins, the benefits for preventing heart attack and stroke outweigh those risks.

    Researchers analyzed data on nearly 154,000 women followed for an average of seven years.

    Women who reported taking a statin such as Lipitor,Pravachol, Zocor, or other statin drugs were almost 50% more likely to report developing type 2 diabetes than women who did not take statins, according to principal researcher Yunsheng Ma, MD, PhD, MPH, of the University of Massachusetts Medical School.

    Statin Users Report More Diabetes

    The study included 153,840 postmenopausal women with an average age at enrollment of 63. Most were followed for about seven years.

    None of the women had diabetes when they were included in the study, but 10,242 cases of self-reported diabetes were found by the end of follow-up.

    After taking into account older age, obesity, lack of physical activity, and other risk factors for diabetes, statin use was associated with an almost 50% chance of developing the disease.

    Adults with diabetes are two to four times more likely to have heart disease or a stroke than adults without diabetes.

    In fact, the American Diabetes Association recommends that in addition to lifestyle changes, all people with diabetes take a statin regardless of their cholesterol level or whether they have heart disease.

    Study author Annie L. Culver tells WebMD that this recommendation should not change, but clinicians should also stress the importance of lifestyle in lowering heart attack and stroke risk.

    "There is a tendency to believe that drugs are the answer, when it is clear that eating well, exercising, and making other lifestyle changes are hugely important for lowering diabetes and cardiovascular risk," Culver says.

    New York University cardiologist Nieca Goldberg, MD, who specializes in treating women with heart disease, agrees that lifestyle is often overlooked when patients are placed on statins.

    "Sometimes when people are on statins they think it is a license to eat anything they want," she says. "This is certainly not the case, especially after menopause when women seem to have a harder time metabolizing sugar. That's why I tell my patients to watch out for starches and sugar."

    Statin, Diabetes Risk Seen in Earlier Studies

    It is not clear if statin use caused the increased risk or if the women who took statins shared some other unidentified risk for diabetes.

    But the study is not the first to suggest that statins may raise the risk for diabetes.

    An analysis of 13 studies, published in February of 2010, found that statin users had a 9% increased risk for diabetes. Another study, published last June, suggested a similar increase in risk among patients taking high doses of statins.

    If the drugs do increase diabetes risk, the studies suggest that the risk is an effect shared by all statins, Ma says.

    Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women's Hospital cardiologist Christopher P. Cannon, MD, remains convinced that for most people who take statins to lower their risk for heart attack and stroke, the benefits far outweigh the risks.

    "These studies are a reminder that no drug is without side effects, but if there is a risk it is more than likely a very small one," he says.

    A spokesman for Lipitor manufacturer Pfizer Inc. says the drug has been shown in multiple studies to reduce heart attack and stroke risk in high-risk patients, including those with type 2 diabetes.

    "We believe the risk of diabetes is outweighed by the [healthy heart] benefits of Lipitor therapy and we encourage patients to work with their physicians to discuss their treatment options," Pfizer media representative MacKay Jimeson tells WebMD.

    SOURCES: Culver, A.L. Archives of Internal Medicine, published online Jan. 9, 2012.Annie L. Culver, University of Massachusetts Diabetes and Endocrinology

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from AppDev. Show AppDev's posts

    Some news not worth reading

    Thanks for bringing this discussion back from the archives. The study by Culver and colleagues was not clearly reported when it came out. It isn't reported clearly here either, claiming, "statin use was associated with an almost 50% chance of developing the disease." That would be nearly a death sentence.

    In fact, the study cites about 700 participants out of about 160,000 who were taking statins and developed diabetes over six years. While there may be an added risk, it would on the order of 0.1 percent per year, far less than a "50% chance."

    No news seen so far tells how to find the study, insulting readers. [ Annie L. Culver, et al., Statin use and risk of diabetes mellitus in postmenopausal women in the Women's Health Initiative, Archives of Internal Medicine (in press), 2012, at http://archinte.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/short/archinternmed.2011.625 ]

    The Culver study is purely observational. Historically, similar studies have been misleading. Systematic, controlled studies usually failed to confirm their findings.

    The major case against statins is low but well-established risk of neurological damage, potential risk of cancer and lack of evidence for health benefits, except for people who have already suffered heart attacks. Dr. John Abramson's book, Overdosed America [Harper Collins, 2004], contains an excellent and still cogent summary of the evidence in Chapter 9.

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from dog-lady. Show dog-lady's posts

    Re: statins and side effects, an alternative treatment

    Well,  I know I can't tolerate them,  I've been taking Endur-Actin (long acting Niacin) for about 10 years with excellent results and no side effects (see first post in this thread) but I also watch my diet and exercise. I have known 3 friends that took statins for 3-15 years, all had to come off of them due to side effects and inability to tolerate plus abnormal labs ie:elevated lfts.
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from AppDev. Show AppDev's posts

    Risks without benefits

    Yes, results are highly variable. Our family has two who can't stand statins (one with muscle weakness, one with stomach upset), one with no measureable lipid change from high-dose niacin, one with both LDL decrease and HDL increase from statins, one with only LDL decrease, and two with strong HDL increases from exercise. Currently, influenced by a discouraging risk profile for statins, none are using them.

    What Dr. Abramson's book reveals--totally lost on nearly all medical writers about statins--is that there is no evidence for inferring health benefits from lab results. The ALLHAT study, so far the largest and longest randomized trial, showed no statistically significant mortality reduction. All benefits from lower incidence of cardiac-arrest death were cancelled out by higher incidence of death from other causes.

    Manufacturers of statin drugs bought influence on government panels that have recommended their products and got favorable returns on investments. Our physician community--for good or ill--remains dominated by received opinion and lacks skill at weighing evidence.

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from dog-lady. Show dog-lady's posts

    Re: statins and side effects, an alternative treatment

    Tuesday February 28, 2012 FDA Adds Diabetes Warning to Statin Label WASHINGTON -- The FDA is changing the labeling on statins to include a warning about increased risks of hyperglycemia and transient memory problems, but the agency is no longer recommending routine liver function testing.


    http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/29/health/fda-warns-of-cholesterol-drugs-side-effects.html?_r=1&ref=health&pagewanted=print
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from dog-lady. Show dog-lady's posts

    Re: statins and side effects, an alternative treatment

    http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/03/05/help-for-the-heart-comes-with-a-price-for-the-brain/?pagemode=print
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from GoneToTheDogs39. Show GoneToTheDogs39's posts

    Re: statins and side effects, an alternative treatment

    @Obbieite,  learn what you can by reading articles written by health care professionals but be prepared, most drs keep up with stuff and may be offended if you bring too much information with you. 

    Also, I have found when you mention anything about what a celebrity dr has to say their eyes glaze over and they tune out completely and stop listening to you! 

    I have found it best to focus on what my needs are, make a list of all your concerns nice and neat so you can go over them with him, keep a daily log of your dietary intake, share that with him. 

    List any symptoms and possible precipitants regarding your specific medical concerns.  

    Bring a list of your cholesterol levels when you get them checked, and a list of all supplements, doses and times you are taking them.  

    Questions about what you should or shouldn't eat?  Have that list ready too.  

    You'll do fine!

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from GoneToTheDogs39. Show GoneToTheDogs39's posts

    atorvastatin recall

    http://www.fda.gov/Safety/Recalls/ucm329866.htm

     

Share