Best way to save money on a wedding

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from Missy509. Show Missy509's posts

    Best way to save money on a wedding

    I don't know where you are getting this $5k figure for an open bar. We had an open bar for 100 guests, and the bill was under $2k - ALF

    200 GUESTS
    20 PER HEAD (WHICH IS ACTUALLY ON THE LOW END, IF YOU CHECK AND SEEE WHAT VENUES CHARGE PER HEAD FOR OPEN BAR)
    TOTAL = 4,000
    PLUS 5% ADMIN CHARGE = 200
    PLUS 18% GRATUITY = 720

    GRAND TOTAL = 4,920

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from ALF72. Show ALF72's posts

    Best way to save money on a wedding

    [Quote]
    I don't know where you are getting this $5k figure for an open bar. We had an open bar for 100 guests, and the bill was under $2k - ALF

    200 GUESTS
    20 PER HEAD (WHICH IS ACTUALLY ON THE LOW END, IF YOU CHECK AND SEEE WHAT VENUES CHARGE PER HEAD FOR OPEN BAR)
    TOTAL = 4,000
    PLUS 5% ADMIN CHARGE = 200
    PLUS 18% GRATUITY = 720

    GRAND TOTAL = 4,920
    [/Quote]

    You are inviting 200 adults of drinking age to your wedding? You have no one under the age of 21 invited? You should only be charged for the amount of people who are able to drink, otherwise you are overpaying.

    Personally, I would not look at places that charge a set amount per head. We paid consumption rather than pp and it made a big difference. Check w/ your venue to see if they will let you do this. One of my sisters had her reception at a place in NH and the coordinator actually suggested that the bar be set up this way [consumption] rather than the PP charge that was included w/ the package. It saved a good amount of money b/c most of the older relatives who were invited did not have more than 1 drink, if any.

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from sarahbth. Show sarahbth's posts

    Best way to save money on a wedding

    This is something to consider early on in planning. Choosing a venue that allows you to bring in your own liquor, and paying bartenders (insured, bonded) can make all the difference. We had open service for liquor for our wedding, and an all afternoon to evening outdoor party the next day. Of the 125 - 140 adults of drinking age at each, many were nursing, some older and not big drinkers. We spent under $1,500 including liquor for both days and bartenders for the wedding (inn staff served next day.) I would guess that would cover 1 event with heavier drinkers, or more people.

    Alcoholic beverages you serve do not have to include every drink known to man, or Top shelf $75 a liter brands. We got by with Baccardi and Stoly and Kahlua type, with a couple of high quality scotch and brandy bottles for the few of our parents generation who know the difference. Beer from NH Shaws on summer sales, wine and hard liquor from NH liquor stores. My husband bought items on sale, mostly around Memorial Day and near July 4 (Just 2 trips, 2/3 on sale at one or the other and the rest regular price) which in NH was better than any MA distributor prices.

    I do not mind if there is no alcohol at a wedding. People choose their own level of hospitality, but the choice to have an open bar need not be an outrageous cost, or be the reason major things like music, video etc are eliminated.
    Choosing wine and beer only may not be cheapest. Before selecting a venue, checking for 21 dollar a bottle corking fees in addition to the per glass served cost matters.
    The hidden costs of having a vendor do the liquor - the 18% gratuity and any 18-20% administrative fees, plus outrageous corking fees, are on top of the overall liquor cost.
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from downtoearth. Show downtoearth's posts

    Best way to save money on a wedding

    I wore an heirloom dress. Bought my veil through the JCPenney catalog. Plain old white shoes - which I have worn again! Makeup by sister, hair done by myself. Borrowed my jewelry. Parents drove me to the church (no limo!) Made my own bouquets well ahead of time from silk flowers (they still decorate my home and my bridesmaids' homes!)

    Reception was heavy finger food and lots of booze - (per person charge.) Hired a DJ. A friend made the cake as a gift, niece and nephew made the centerpieces as a gift (they were beyond ugly, but the love was there!) Plain old tablecloths and napkins. A semi-pro photagrapher who gave me all proofs and negatives!

    100 guests for around $5000.
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from laryan. Show laryan's posts

    Best way to save money on a wedding

    [Quote]

    Laryan, where are these places that would not let you serve alcohol b/c you had underage people coming? That's just bizarre. I find it hard to believe any venue would NOT let you serve alcohol - that is where they make the bulk of their money. I can see them requiring that people show IDs to the bartenders, but not just have an outright ban on alcohol.[/Quote]

    alot of these places were in the immediate towns surrounding boston, to the south/southwest (dedham, westwood, norwood etc.)

    they didnt have a total ban on alcohol, its just that they didn't want to get caught serving kids, knowing alot of people don't bring id's to a wedding.

    several years back, alot of the VFW halls & K of C type halls in the general area got caught renting their halls to someone who is barely 21, invited all their underage friends and it would turn out to be an underage drinking party...
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from laryan. Show laryan's posts

    Best way to save money on a wedding

    [Quote]

    I totally agree. Your guests should not have to open their wallet at your wedding. If you can't afford an open bar, don't serve alcohol. It's as simple as that. If your relatives and friends are pigs who can't control themselves, like some posters have described, but you still want to have alcohol at your wedding, serve only beer and wine, but no hard liquor. It amazes me that adults would act in the fashion described by some posters - I have never been to a wedding were anyone got so drunk they could not function. At that point, the staff should step in and either cut the drunk off or else escort him/her out. But to justify a cash bar with anecdotes about what social boors your friends and relatives can be just amazes me. Why are you inviting them, if they make such spectacles of themselves and disrupt everyone else's evening? It sounds like they are going to cause problems whether you have a cash bar or an open bar. The long and the short of it is that it is rude to expect your guests to shell out to cover items that you want at your wedding but cannot afford. No one is saying that you HAVE to provide these things - if you can't swing it financially, don't offer it. Period. Everyone is going to have a good time anyway. If you need alcohol to have a good time at a wedding, then you have bigger problems than open bar v. cash bar.[/Quote]

    some people obviously haven't experienced an Irish wedding, where liquor is just as much a part of the landscape as the food & entertainment...
     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from ALF72. Show ALF72's posts

    Best way to save money on a wedding

    [Quote]

    some people obviously haven't experienced an Irish wedding, where liquor is just as much a part of the landscape as the food & entertainment...[/Quote]

    My grandmother was fresh off the boat in the 1930s, and some of my dad's cousins came over in the 1980s; their accents are still going strong. My Irish relatives know how to party, as do DH's Scottish relatives and Navy buddies. However, we were also taught not to take advantage of the hospitality of friends and relatives. I can honestly say that, whether over here or over there for weddings/family reunions, I have never seen anoyone incapacitated by drink, although they may have had some serious hangovers in the AM.
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from framerican51008. Show framerican51008's posts

    Best way to save money on a wedding

    [Quote]

    I don't know where you are getting this $5k figure for an open bar. We had an open bar for 100 guests, and the bill was under $2k. [/Quote]

    To be fair ALF, wasn't your wedding in the middle of the day? The tab likely would have been higher if the reception started at 6 or 7 pm. Just sayin'.

    To other posters, I don't know who you all hang out with! My friends ain't no high class snobs, but they don't go wild and crazy every time there's an open bar at a wedding. Guess I'm lucky.
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from ALF72. Show ALF72's posts

    Best way to save money on a wedding

    [Quote]

    To be fair ALF, wasn't your wedding in the middle of the day? The tab likely would have been higher if the reception started at 6 or 7 pm. Just sayin'.

    To other posters, I don't know who you all hang out with! My friends ain't no high class snobs, but they don't go wild and crazy every time there's an open bar at a wedding. Guess I'm lucky.[/Quote]

    The reception started at 1.30 and went to 6.30. People were plenty buzzed, but no one was falling down drunk. I don't see why time of day makes that much of a difference [unless you are talking about a brunch reception]. Why would people suddenly start chugging once the bell rang 6 PM? It's always 5 o'clock somewhere. Even at evening weddings, I don't see the falling down drunk behavior that other people are mentioning. Yes, there are always one or 2 people who may get carried away, but it's never the whole party, and no one needs to have their stomach pumped afterwards, which is what PP have made their receptions sound like. I don't think you have to be a high class snob to have the social graces not to make a fool of yourself at a formal event, and to not act like a pig and suck down as many drinks as you can b/c someone else is paying. People at my reception were not sipping tea with one pinky raised and remarking to Buffy what a lovely day it was, but neither were they downing shots [which coincidentally the venue did not serve] or dancing on the tables taking off their clothes.
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from Missy509. Show Missy509's posts

    Best way to save money on a wedding

    [Quote]

    The reception started at 1.30 and went to 6.30. People were plenty buzzed, but no one was falling down drunk. I don't see why time of day makes that much of a difference [unless you are talking about a brunch reception]. Why would people suddenly start chugging once the bell rang 6 PM? It's always 5 o'clock somewhere. Even at evening weddings, I don't see the falling down drunk behavior that other people are mentioning. Yes, there are always one or 2 people who may get carried away, but it's never the whole party, and no one needs to have their stomach pumped afterwards, which is what PP have made their receptions sound like. I don't think you have to be a high class snob to have the social graces not to make a fool of yourself at a formal event, and to not act like a pig and suck down as many drinks as you can b/c someone else is paying. People at my reception were not sipping tea with one pinky raised and remarking to Buffy what a lovely day it was, but neither were they downing shots [which coincidentally the venue did not serve] or dancing on the tables taking off their clothes.[/Quote]

    ALF, the time of day has everything to do with it. The atmosphere of a day reception and a night reception are completely different. People tend to drink more at evening events.
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from downtoearth. Show downtoearth's posts

    Best way to save money on a wedding

    [Quote]

    ALF, the time of day has everything to do with it. The atmosphere of a day reception and a night reception are completely different. People tend to drink more at evening events.[/Quote]

    not in my family!

    As Laryan started to say, certain cultures embrace drinking as part of the celebration. Irish, Italian, Mexican, Spanish.... To my family, it's not a party until we've poured the first cocktail.

    I don't care when it starts, a wedding is a drinking event. Those of you who have different backgrounds - not an issue, but it doesn't make my family irresponsible, simply ...well... fun.
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from framerican51008. Show framerican51008's posts

    Best way to save money on a wedding

    [Quote]

    I don't think you have to be a high class snob to have the social graces not to make a fool of yourself at a formal event, and to not act like a pig and suck down as many drinks as you can b/c someone else is paying. People at my reception were not sipping tea with one pinky raised and remarking to Buffy what a lovely day it was, but neither were they downing shots [which coincidentally the venue did not serve] or dancing on the tables taking off their clothes.[/Quote]

    Hope you didn't think I was suggesting that you (or anyone else on the boards) is a high class snob!
    I was just basically saying that we're still young (27) and come from modest backgrounds, but the majority our friends and family don't get wasted just because the booze is free. We also come from pretty Irish backgrounds, so I guess some of you are going to have to re-think your lovely little stereotypes.
     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from sarahbth. Show sarahbth's posts

    Best way to save money on a wedding

    [Quote]

    My grandmother was fresh off the boat in the 1930s, and some of my dad's cousins came over in the 1980s; their accents are still going strong. My Irish relatives know how to party, as do DH's Scottish relatives and Navy buddies. However, we were also taught not to take advantage of the hospitality of friends and relatives. I can honestly say that, whether over here or over there for weddings/family reunions, I have never seen anoyone incapacitated by drink, although they may have had some serious hangovers in the AM.[/Quote]

    Some ethnic groups have a rep for being drinkers, but the drinking culture is often more group specific than that.

    Having had one serious accident and death in our family, we are pretty conscious of responsible drinking.

    But at our weddings a year apart, my 3 years older sister and her 28 yr old husband's friends, and his brothers' friends, were a problem. My father helped pay for their wedding, and having seen them pour liquor like a bad teen movie - all heavy drinkers, jocks who made a sport of drinking in prep school and college - he and their venue made a condition they had to use a spread sheet for consumption and liability. Sure enough, the second fifteen minutes of coctail hour, 15 or more of these friends are getting belligerant about not being served a third drink. My wedding - one of FI's older uncles was a problem, family had to say - enough. Which he respected.
    My sister's open bar allowed either a cocktail to be ordered (plus champagne for toasts) but not that and wine. One hour into dinner, when waitstaff were freed up to take orders , again the bitching started - men and women offering to pay to get more.They did not like being told - you have had 2 cocktails earlier, a cocktail and champagne with dinner, 1 cocktail as soon as serving started again, and now, 2 1/4 hours after the doors opened, having had 5 drinks, no more for an hour. You would think it was their constitutional right to get plastered. They were waving bills at the waitstaff, would not accept that now all drinks were free, and if you were cut off for too many too quickly, you could not go cash and buy more. The same 20 or so left after about 3 or 3 1/4 hours of the wedding. Obnoxious, some sister's friends, mostly hubby's (his brothers stayed and grumbled) The other 200 people were fine with thw general, a drink an hour plus one (plus a second during dinner toasts not counted.) So the max drinks was 7 in a six hour do, and more than half the invitees had 3-4.
    The true consumption count, not estimate, mattered. But mostly, not having a bunch of drunks, at or leaving the wedding.
     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from ALF72. Show ALF72's posts

    Best way to save money on a wedding

    [Quote]

    not in my family!

    As Laryan started to say, certain cultures embrace drinking as part of the celebration. Irish, Italian, Mexican, Spanish.... To my family, it's not a party until we've poured the first cocktail.

    I don't care when it starts, a wedding is a drinking event. Those of you who have different backgrounds - not an issue, but it doesn't make my family irresponsible, simply ...well... fun.
    [/Quote]

    Not in my family either, AB. The bar tab would have been the same at a day or night wedding. Don't get me wrong, we have people who can really hold their liquor in my family, but I honestly have never seen an entire wedding reception go overboard at a wedding and get falling down drunk like some people have posted. One of my BILs was kind of catatonic after our wedding, so I'm guessing he had a great time, but he was still coherent and could walk just fine even though he was glassy eyed and reduced to monosyllable answers. DH's uncle was headed in the same direction, but he was still going strong on the charm and chattiness at the end of the day.
     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from Nasochkas. Show Nasochkas's posts

    Best way to save money on a wedding

    More than half of my guests are out of town. I am not going to make them come to Boston from all over the place to be served bad food or only beer and wine. Open bar is important! Also, if they are coming from out of state, I am not going to make them take days off to come for a friday or sunday wedding. Let them party their pants off on a saturday night and sleep it off. What else should we celebrate if not a marriage?

    I am trying to save on flowers..making simpler centerpieces..the hotel has enough decor as is. The parents expanded the guest list by a lot..but they want to share this moment with their close friends..and I do not blame them.
    I am chosing cocktail dresses for my bridesmaids..so they do not spend a lot and can wear the dresses again.
    Also, we went with a DJ for the entire wedding, ceremony, cocktail hour, reception..definitely cheaper.
    I also saved a ton on a dress by going to a sample sale. Purchased a 2.5K designer gown for only 900.
     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from Nasochkas. Show Nasochkas's posts

    Best way to save money on a wedding

    [Quote]Have a small(er) wedding party. I wish someone had told me this before I asked all my BM's. The cost of gifts, flowers, rehearsal dinner and transportation really adds up.[/Quote]

    You do not need a rehearsal dinner. THis is a strange American tradition. No other cultures do this. My officiant said we can rehearse the ceremony in 15 min the day of the wedding and so we are.
     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from Nasochkas. Show Nasochkas's posts

    Best way to save money on a wedding

    [Quote]Elope. OR , if you feel you have to do "something", remember Martha Stewart. "If you wouldn't have them to your house for dinner, don not invite them to your wedding"... this addage whittled our guest list from 200 to 40. We had a very intimate wedding and reception and it was easy and stress free. Good luck and enjoy. Less is MORE!!!![/Quote]

    I wish I could have a 40-60 person wedding..but the mother and MIL invited more..now its about 120 people. Oh well..they are paying. It definitely destroys the intimacy, as I wont even know half of the people.
     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from allreadymarried. Show allreadymarried's posts

    Best way to save money on a wedding

    Someone mentioned that not all guests are 21 regarding open bar. Regardless of the age you have to pay the fee for open bar for the total number of quests.
    Open bar should be a given. Your guest should not have to pay for any type of drink.
     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from Nasochkas. Show Nasochkas's posts

    Best way to save money on a wedding

    [Quote]

    i'm sitting here thinking, with all the weddings i've been too an in, I can think of only one where the bar was open, every other wedding has been a cash bar.

    alot of these venues are "liquor liability" crazy. when I was planning mine, alot of venues wouldn't even consider an open bar for any part of the reception, mostly because of "liquor liability issues"....I also found alot of venues wouldn't rent for functions where there were going to be alot of "under agers"...however, we had originally planned and "adult only" reception to begin with.

    [/Quote]

    Open bar was one condition my fiance and i set. We are young, many of our guests are int he mid-twenties. If our parents want to have big pretty white wedding with all their guests..then we are having open bar.
     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from Nasochkas. Show Nasochkas's posts

    Best way to save money on a wedding

    [Quote]

    I totally agree. Your guests should not have to open their wallet at your wedding. If you can't afford an open bar, don't serve alcohol. It's as simple as that. If your relatives and friends are pigs who can't control themselves, like some posters have described, but you still want to have alcohol at your wedding, serve only beer and wine, but no hard liquor. It amazes me that adults would act in the fashion described by some posters - I have never been to a wedding were anyone got so drunk they could not function. At that point, the staff should step in and either cut the drunk off or else escort him/her out. But to justify a cash bar with anecdotes about what social boors your friends and relatives can be just amazes me. Why are you inviting them, if they make such spectacles of themselves and disrupt everyone else's evening? It sounds like they are going to cause problems whether you have a cash bar or an open bar. The long and the short of it is that it is rude to expect your guests to shell out to cover items that you want at your wedding but cannot afford. No one is saying that you HAVE to provide these things - if you can't swing it financially, don't offer it. Period. Everyone is going to have a good time anyway. If you need alcohol to have a good time at a wedding, then you have bigger problems than open bar v. cash bar.[/Quote]

    Actually, the prudes can stay away from my wedding. People like to drink at weddings. It is fun. This is why we are doing it on a saturday night, at a hotel, so that no one has to drive and can book a room. People should drink , and dance, and have fun! I plan on drinking at my own wedding.
     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from Nasochkas. Show Nasochkas's posts

    Best way to save money on a wedding

    [Quote][Quote]

    Missy, if people cannot afford $5k for an open bar, then they should cut back in other areas (like maybe the guest list?) or offer a limited bar. Guests shouldn't have to pay for anything.

    [/Quote]

    I agree. The thought of asking my guests to open their wallet makes me shudder.[/Quote]

    The one thing my guests will need to pay for is hotel rooms and overnight parking. Valet parking during the event, but not overnight, will be provided. Open bar and good food will be provided. I do not want my guests walking away bored. I want them to remember a fun time, good food, good alcohol, good music and good company.
    I went to wedding that served pretty much only cheese and wine (yellow tail..eew)..i still remember this as the worst wedding i have ever been to. On top of that, the family was very well off..they did not have any money problems. The only thing people remembered was their cheapness.
     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from Nasochkas. Show Nasochkas's posts

    Best way to save money on a wedding

    [Quote][Quote]

    I don't know where you are getting this $5k figure for an open bar. We had an open bar for 100 guests, and the bill was under $2k - ALF

    200 GUESTS
    20 PER HEAD (WHICH IS ACTUALLY ON THE LOW END, IF YOU CHECK AND SEEE WHAT VENUES CHARGE PER HEAD FOR OPEN BAR)
    TOTAL = 4,000
    PLUS 5% ADMIN CHARGE = 200
    PLUS 18% GRATUITY = 720

    GRAND TOTAL = 4,920

    [/Quote]

    You are inviting 200 adults of drinking age to your wedding? You have no one under the age of 21 invited? You should only be charged for the amount of people who are able to drink, otherwise you are overpaying.

    Personally, I would not look at places that charge a set amount per head. We paid consumption rather than pp and it made a big difference. Check w/ your venue to see if they will let you do this. One of my sisters had her reception at a place in NH and the coordinator actually suggested that the bar be set up this way [consumption] rather than the PP charge that was included w/ the package. It saved a good amount of money b/c most of the older relatives who were invited did not have more than 1 drink, if any.[/Quote]

    The place I am getting married at is 32 per head, plus 25% tip, fee, tax... 20 bucks is a great deal.
    Consumption bars are usually about 5 bucks a beer, 7 for wine, and 8-9 for mixed drink. If your reception is 4 hours long, think on average one drink an hour..it can add up.
     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from Nasochkas. Show Nasochkas's posts

    Best way to save money on a wedding

    [Quote]

    some people obviously haven't experienced an Irish wedding, where liquor is just as much a part of the landscape as the food & entertainment...[/Quote]

    or a russian one =)
     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from laryan. Show laryan's posts

    Best way to save money on a wedding

    [Quote]

    Some ethnic groups have a rep for being drinkers, but the drinking culture is often more group specific than that.

    Having had one serious accident and death in our family, we are pretty conscious of responsible drinking.

    But at our weddings a year apart, my 3 years older sister and her 28 yr old husband's friends, and his brothers' friends, were a problem. My father helped pay for their wedding, and having seen them pour liquor like a bad teen movie - all heavy drinkers, jocks who made a sport of drinking in prep school and college - he and their venue made a condition they had to use a spread sheet for consumption and liability. Sure enough, the second fifteen minutes of coctail hour, 15 or more of these friends are getting belligerant about not being served a third drink. My wedding - one of FI's older uncles was a problem, family had to say - enough. Which he respected.
    My sister's open bar allowed either a cocktail to be ordered (plus champagne for toasts) but not that and wine. One hour into dinner, when waitstaff were freed up to take orders , again the bitching started - men and women offering to pay to get more.They did not like being told - you have had 2 cocktails earlier, a cocktail and champagne with dinner, 1 cocktail as soon as serving started again, and now, 2 1/4 hours after the doors opened, having had 5 drinks, no more for an hour. You would think it was their constitutional right to get plastered. They were waving bills at the waitstaff, would not accept that now all drinks were free, and if you were cut off for too many too quickly, you could not go cash and buy more. The same 20 or so left after about 3 or 3 1/4 hours of the wedding. Obnoxious, some sister's friends, mostly hubby's (his brothers stayed and grumbled) The other 200 people were fine with thw general, a drink an hour plus one (plus a second during dinner toasts not counted.) So the max drinks was 7 in a six hour do, and more than half the invitees had 3-4.
    The true consumption count, not estimate, mattered. But mostly, not having a bunch of drunks, at or leaving the wedding.[/Quote]



    we do have a "traditional" family where liquor is part of the celebration,

    we also have had a drunk drive fatality as well...my s ister was killled in by drunk driver on the morning of my original wedding date..
    knows all about it!
     
  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from Bynxers. Show Bynxers's posts

    Best way to save money on a wedding

    Ours got out of control. In the beginning it was great- but leading up to it, I was never more afraid of anything in my life. EVERYONE- brides, bridal parties, parents, guest- you name it, ALL have come to feel so entitled and expect so much from wedding because of the clever marketing on an entire industry that wants to suck as much money as possible from you or your family on that special day. Your event coordinator at the venue or florist or whatever- they are not your friends, their JOB is to ensure you or your parents or whomever SPEND as much as possible!

    A few tips that I pushed through (which got me in a lot of trouble, but needed to be done): switching to chicken- everything else was way too expensive, instead of giving out favors, making a donation to a meaningful cause and putting that on a little card saying "In lieu of favors, a donation to ___ has been made in your honor", switching to beer and wine only about half way through the night (keeps people from getting too drunk), telling the florist 3 months in advances that she was going to need to shave off an extra $500 from her fee, and here's the big one: strategically planning the guest list to ensure a high number of invites so people are honored to be invited- but making the time or place or whatever difficult to get to. If your wedding is in or right around Boston on a popular holiday weekend- many people are honored to get invited, but are very apprehensive to pay for the hiked up plane ride, hotel rooms, etc.

    It stinks, its horrible- its suppossed to be the best day or your life- but if you walk away from that day in the red, that's no way to start off a marriage.

    Cut your loses- elope and throw a party upon your return. The hulabaloo and stress of the event will kill you before your new life even begins.

    OR just don't get married locally- what would you expect by trying to have a wedding in or around one of the most expensive cities in the country??? We regret not doing ours in Upstate NY in the beauty of the mountians where it would have been significantly cheaper- instead of one of america's top 5 most expensive cities...
     
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