OT: Food processor recipes

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from trex509. Show trex509's posts

    OT: Food processor recipes

    Hey Guys!  I can't remember if I asked this already, if I did, sorry!  I received a really nice Cuisinart food processor as a wedding gift!  I'm not sure why I wanted one so badly, since I've never actually used one.  I'm a little worried I might not use it enough to justify the price, but I really wanted it!

    So:  would you guys share your favorite uses (and maybe recipes if you have any) for your food processors?  I think hearing other people's experiences will inspire me to start using mine!
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: OT: Food processor recipes

    I have the Cuisinart 14 cup and love it! 

    Right now we're totally into baba ganoush (even though roasted eggplant makes my mouth itch!)  Here's my recipe:

    1 lg eggplant (roasted on baking sheet whole 1 hour at 400 turning once and peeled when cool)
    1/2 c tahini
    1/4 fresh lemon juice
    1 tsp sriracha (or other hot sauce or adobo), optional
    salt and pepper to taste

    I make 100% organic whole spelt crackers to scoop it with.  I make it in the bread maker on "pizza dough" setting:

    5 cups spelt flour
    1 tsp salt
    1 tsp sugar
    1 1/2 cups cool water
    1 Tbl olive oil
    ETA:  1 Tbl YEAST!  Oops.  I've forgotten it in real life, too. Bummer.

    Let rise 1 hour after removal from machine.  Pound down, divide into thirds.  Roll out on a silicon mat liberally salted to size of average cookie sheet (thin!) that's been doused in olive oil.  Turn silpat over sheet, peel off dough.  Score (do not cut all the way through) dough in cracker sized squares.  Bake 15 - 17 minutes (or until browned and pulling away from pan and house smells like crackers).  Remove pans and lift whole pieces up to rest on the edge of pan (so steam can't condense underneath during cooling).  When cold, snap into crackers and store in air tight gallon bag.

    P.S.   I don't dirty it for an average chopping job, but I will use it for shredding.  If you're going to make a zucchini bread, for instance, it's worth it to grate the zucchini in there.  Save your knuckles.  We also use ours for hummus, but there are a million recipes online for that.    It's great for any type of dip.  Cream cheese and whatever herbs or dip mix, for instance.
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from pingo. Show pingo's posts

    Re: OT: Food processor recipes

    Trex, to use a food processor takes some practice. It is great for certain things, but not worthwhile for others.
    I - for example - do not use it for chopping things unless I want them paste-like.  They can easily get too mushy. But it is the best thing to use for pie or tart pastry.
    I do have the larger Cuisinart, but the one I use the most is the smallest food processor Cuisinart makes (2 cups, I think). I use it for making salad dressings, mayonnaise, hummus or other dip, spreads and sauces. And I use it big time to chop herbs and make fresh bread crumbs. It makes smaller amounts one can use up in one sitting, and a lot easier to use and clean. Goes right in the DW.
    You really don't need much of a recipe. Anything you need to "mush up" will be suitable for the processor.
    The one thing, I do NOT use it for, is to process a lot of liquid. The blender or immersion blender is a lot better for that.


     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from NorthernLghts. Show NorthernLghts's posts

    Re: OT: Food processor recipes

    I only have a small 2cup food processor. I use it to grind up jar salsa lol. I hate chunky, mushy jar salsa so I grind it up so it's the consistance of some restaurant salsas, much better. Not much of a recipe I realize :-)
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from lucy7368. Show lucy7368's posts

    Re: OT: Food processor recipes

    The food processor really is great for making mayonnaise.  It's MUCH better than store-bought and a lot easier than whisking it by hand.
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from pingo. Show pingo's posts

    Re: OT: Food processor recipes

    Northern, try to make your own salad dressings too. Much cheaper and a lot   tastier too, as you can add the flavorings YOU like. Besides no preservatives. You can save the leftovers in a jar in your fridge for a week or so, if it will last that long.

    If anyone is in the market for buying a food processor, I always tell them to get the small 2 cup one. I have a 12-cup one and a 2-cup one. Hardly ever use the larger one, but the smaller one I use almost every day. Love it!

    In Response to Re: OT: Food processor recipes:
    [QUOTE]I only have a small 2cup food processor. I use it to grind up jar salsa lol. I hate chunky, mushy jar salsa so I grind it up so it's the consistance of some restaurant salsas, much better. Not much of a recipe I realize :-)
    Posted by NorthernLghts[/QUOTE]
     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from pingo. Show pingo's posts

    Re: OT: Food processor recipes

    Agree with you Lucy. Better taste and NO preservatives.

    For the ones who have never made their own mayonnaise, there are a few tricks that make it a 'no fail'.  Have all the ingredients at room temperature. Blend in a Tbs. of oil with the egg yolk (I do not use the eggwhite, even though some do) and salt. Then  drop the oil through the chute drop by drop to start with, while the processor is running. When the mayo starts to emulsify and thicken a bit, you can add the oil in a 'stream'. When the mayo is done, you can add your flavoring to taste (lemon juice, mustard, herbs etc.). Try roasted garlic for a sandwich spread or Tarragon for eating w/ roasted asparagus.
    Should the mayo separate (which it can do w/o your fault), just start all over with a new egg yolk and the 'ruined' mayo dropping it in drop by drop etc. 

    In Response to Re: OT: Food processor recipes:
    [QUOTE]The food processor really is great for making mayonnaise.  It's MUCH better than store-bought and a lot easier than whisking it by hand.
    Posted by lucy7368[/QUOTE]
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: OT: Food processor recipes

    Price Chopper sells tahini with the peanut butter for sure (at least the one in Spencer does), and I think I've seen it at Trader Joe's.  GL!
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from pingo. Show pingo's posts

    Re: OT: Food processor recipes

    Cicirose and Kar, tahini is very easy to make yourself. It is sold in most grocery stores, but after I started making my own I never buy it again.
    Place 1 cup of raw sesame seeds in your food processor and add about 1/3 cup oil (the amount does not need to be exact). Process, and you will end up with about 1/2 cup of a thick paste. That is Tahini. Just right the amount to make Hummus from a can of chickpeas. (After the Tahini is done, just continue with the rest of the recipe for hummus).
    If you want a richer flavor you can roast the sesame seeds first, but it is not necessary. You can roast them in your microwave oven until they turn brownish. Watch them, they burn fast.
    I buy the sesame seeds in an Indian grocery store - much cheaper there. Then freeze what I don't need. They keep well.
     
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    Re: OT: Food processor recipes

    Thanks, I think I'll do that.  I like the idea of making exactly the amount I need each time instead of trying to combine the separated stuff in the can to measure out what I need.  And, no more work or cleanup. Great tip, Pingo, thanks!!  What kind of oil do you add?
     
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    Re: OT: Food processor recipes

    I wouldn't roast the seeds, anyway.  I think the tahini you buy is made from raw seeds.  However seseme oil couldn't hurt either flavor or texture.  I usually add a ton more olive oil than most recipies call for.  I like my hummus extremely smooth and creamy.
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from pingo. Show pingo's posts

    Re: OT: Food processor recipes

    You can use any oil you like. I always use olive oil for whatever I need oil for. Except for frying, which I very rarely do. There I use Canola.
    It is really not necessary to add sesame oil. You will get plenty of Tahini flavor with a cup of seeds. Why waste the expensive sesame oil. But of course, you can add anything to your taste. Roasted garlic is a wonderful addition. (Just cut off top of garlic, sprinkle with some olive olive oil and give it 7 minutes in the micro on high - gives a nice mellow garlic flavor.)
    Roasting the seeds gives a tiny bit more flavor, but there is really not much of a difference. I decided  it was not worth my while.
    I forgot to mention, that you MUST make the Tahini first, before you add the rest. Or you will end up with humus with chewy seeds. (I learned the hard way.)
    Also, buy the WHITE sesame seeds. There is another kind, which is grayish/brownish (I think they still have the husk on???). I buy my seeds at an Indian grocery store. So MUCH cheaper. I paid $2.49 for 400 grams - which is close to an American pound.
    Believe me, 400 gram will give you plenty of hummus.




     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from pingo. Show pingo's posts

    Re: OT: Food processor recipes

    Trex,
    I was looking for a Prune-Plum recipe and came across this article fro New York Times:

    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/15/dining/15mini.html?src=me&ref=general

    Lots of good information - Pingo
     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from trex509. Show trex509's posts

    Re: OT: Food processor recipes

    Thanks Pingo!  What a great article!
     
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    Re: OT: Food processor recipes

    I made mayo last night the Mark Bittman way, by using the foodprocessor and the "drip hole" - couldn't have been easier.

    In Response to Re: OT: Food processor recipes:
    [QUOTE]Thanks Pingo!  What a great article!
    Posted by trex509[/QUOTE]
     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from lucy7368. Show lucy7368's posts

    Re: OT: Food processor recipes

    Yeah - it's amazing.  Especially if you've made it the old-fashioned way... which takes FOREVER.
     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from poppy609. Show poppy609's posts

    Re: OT: Food processor recipes

    It has NEVER occurred to me in my whole life to make my own mayonnaise.  And I LOVE mayonnaise. 
     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from lucy7368. Show lucy7368's posts

    Re: OT: Food processor recipes

    If you make your own, you can add rosemary.  Mmmmmmmmmmmmm!

    You can also add garlic or .... really, just about anything you want.  Truffle mayo is really good, but truffles are insanely expensive (and I wouldn't use them for anything else).  There's this french fry place in NY that I used to go to all the time - they had 36 varieties of mayonnaise.  Mmmmm....

    I love mayo, too.  I was telling my roommate yesterday that I like mayo and tomato sandwiches, and she was appalled.
     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from NorthernLghts. Show NorthernLghts's posts

    Re: OT: Food processor recipes

    In Response to Re: OT: Food processor recipes:
    [QUOTE]If you make your own, you can add rosemary.  Mmmmmmmmmmmmm! You can also add garlic or .... really, just about anything you want.  Truffle mayo is really good, but truffles are insanely expensive (and I wouldn't use them for anything else).  There's this french fry place in NY that I used to go to all the time - they had 36 varieties of mayonnaise.  Mmmmm.... I love mayo, too.  I was telling my roommate yesterday that I like mayo and tomato sandwiches, and she was appalled.
    Posted by lucy7368[/QUOTE]


    so are you related to Harriet the Spy? Smile
     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: OT: Food processor recipes

    Apalled?  Well, she'd find us horribly offensive, then.  We had grilled tomato, American cheese, and plenty of mayo sandwiches last night for dinner!
     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from pingo. Show pingo's posts

    Re: OT: Food processor recipes

    Poppy, try it once - and you will never buy mayo again. For a beginner it is not the easiest thing to do, so don't be discouraged the first couple of times. (If it breaks up, just start all over again with another egg yolk and the messed up stuff). When you have the hang of it, it is so easy. I have always made it by whisking it by hand. Had a better feel of it. But now, using the food processor and the dripping hole (yeah! Mark Brittman is right - never knew there was a hole - had to look) it has become so easy.
    The advantages are of course, that you make a small fresh batch w/o any preservative and you can add whatever ingredients for taste to your liking.
    Glad to find so many posters 'loving' mayo. I was almost ashamed to admit it. But a little of the real stuff goes a long way. Can't stomach the fake stuff - light, no fat or whatever they call it. Yuck!

    In Response to Re: OT: Food processor recipes:
    [QUOTE]It has NEVER occurred to me in my whole life to make my own mayonnaise.  And I LOVE mayonnaise. 
    Posted by poppy609[/QUOTE]
     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from beastsgirl. Show beastsgirl's posts

    Re: OT: Food processor recipes

    I loved Harriet the Spy. I also love homemade mayo, and LOVE tomato and mayo sandwiches.
     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from poppy609. Show poppy609's posts

    Re: OT: Food processor recipes

    I will definitely be trying that at some point... How long will homemade mayo typically last?  I would be the only one in my household eating it, so probably should make just a little at a time?

    When I was a kid, I used to eat mayo sandwiches - yes, just mayo and bread.  My husband is revolted by this.
     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: OT: Food processor recipes

    It's made with raw eggs so it doesn't keep more than a few days.  Also, you might try egg beaters with the recent salmonella issue.  I still use regular raw eggs, but I live life on the edge, you know?  LOL
     
  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from beastsgirl. Show beastsgirl's posts

    Re: OT: Food processor recipes

    How are egg beaters different from raw eggs Do they just take the cholesteral out of eggs I use All Whites with 1 whole egg to make omelets, I didn't know you could use egg beaters for homemade mayo though. Please excuse my lack of punctuation marks,something is wrong with this keyboard.bg.
     

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