Seating Chart

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from caringteacher. Show caringteacher's posts

    Seating Chart

    Hello Ladies,
    I'm not ready to start the seating chart yet but was looking for advice on the best way to do it. I'd love to pass this job on to my mother or mother in law, but I don't think it's going to work. I'm just wondering if you have any tips on how to keep it organized. I've seen names on a post-it note and stuck on paper plates. Any other suggestions????

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from poppy609. Show poppy609's posts

    Re: Seating Chart

    Hi teacher - I think the post-its is a great idea, just sort of labor intensive if you have to create hundreds of them. :)  I am not sure how someone other than you or your FI would do this, unless your mom or MIL knows all of the relationships and dynamics between all of your guests.  Or would you give them categorized lists of guests?  It could be a great job to give away to someone, as long as you trust that person to do it well.  I found it to be a stressful thing to do, myself!  Good luck.
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from pinkkittie27. Show pinkkittie27's posts

    Re: Seating Chart

    post-its are good. The Knot has a great virtual seating chart thing I used. You type in your guest list, check off who's coming, and then arrange them.

    It's not easy, but it gets done. I got so frustrated with mine that I handed it off to DH, but he was able to do it pretty quickly.
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from ALF72. Show ALF72's posts

    Re: Seating Chart

    We spent an inordinate amount of time on the seating chart.  DH's parents are divorced and we needed to make sure that tables were arranged accordingly. In my family, typically the parents of hte bride and  groom share a table w/ the bride and groom. Yeah, that was not happening. We set up a table of the bride and groom and MOH and Best man [neither of whom brought dates] at one table and then arranged parent tables equally close to the head table, but so that mom and dad didn't need to be in each other's line of sight.  Let's just say it was a feat. 

    I just drew the number of tables I had to fill on a sheet and then manually wrote in names. It took a few goes, but it used less paper than post it notes.  It's generally pretty easy to group who to seat w/ whom.  Had we not had the situation w/ DH's parents, it probably would have gone a lot quicker.  DH had a ton of angst over it.  His 2 brothers actually commented on the seating arrangement and congratulated us for figuring it out.  HIs older brother eloped in part b/c of hte parent situation. I am pretty sure his other brother was taking notes for when he proposes to his GF.  lol. 

    good luck1
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from tomarra. Show tomarra's posts

    Re: Seating Chart

    I did my seating chart with excel.  I had an work sheet with the table names & numbers and another with the guests.  I just copied and pasted from one work sheet to the other. 
    One of my SIL offered to do the seating chart for their side of the family.  I just gave her a copy of the excel sheet and scanned copy of the table setup up at the hall.  The only thing I told her was which table I would like his parents and siblings to sit at and the rest was up to her.
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from Shell7. Show Shell7's posts

    Re: Seating Chart

    I am in the process of doing my seating chart now. I am using the Post It flags.. smaller than regular ones and very easy to move to make changes. I am only asking my mom and mother-in-law who they want seated at their tables. Other than that I am placing particular families and friends together. When I am done, my fiance can make suggestions on changes.. which I will take into consideration ;)
     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from LindaO1MrsO1. Show LindaO1MrsO1's posts

    Re: Seating Chart

    In Response to Re: Seating Chart:
    [QUOTE]I am in the process of doing my seating chart now. I am using the Post It flags.. smaller than regular ones and very easy to move to make changes. I am only asking my mom and mother-in-law who they want seated at their tables. Other than that I am placing particular families and friends together. When I am done, my fiance can make suggestions on changes.. which I will take into consideration ;)
    Posted by Shell7[/QUOTE]
    I think the Post it notes are a great idea.  Think about coding them - e.g. FOB = Friend of Bride; FamB = Family of Bride; FamG = Family of Groom.
    A note of caution, for my son, Andy's, wedding, he wanted to do the seating chart.  Since it was his wedding, I had no issue with that.  I did tell him about certain family/friends who should be at certain tables/in proximity. Andy shared the table seating arrangements.  However, he did not do an outline of the entire reception area.  Due to the busy activities of the Wedding weekend, I did not review the "set up" of the reception area, until I walked into it.  Unfortunately, the tables were divided into two very separate areas - with the dance floor in between them.   I soon realized that some of our closest family/friends were on the other side of "the great divide".  I was more than embarassed - went to the family/friends and sincerely apologized.  However, most of those then moved to the area where we were sitting.  But, I was still very embarassed. 

    An additional note, my son chose rectangular tables.  When he told me, I said that those tables mean you can only talk to the persons around you.  However, my son said that this was the "newest style".  They were okay - but, I really think that round tables are more graceful and conducive to conversations between guests.  










       


    My son/now his wife wanted long, rectangulat tables - because that is the new trend.  I told him that I hated those kinds of tables and suggested round tables.
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from Summer2010. Show Summer2010's posts

    Re: Seating Chart

    I used the seating chart program on the Knot.  I kept my guest list, responses, meal selection, etc. all on the Knot's program as well which made doing the seating chart really easy since the program automatically pulls the names of your guests that RSVP'd yes.  I also found this program helpful because you can lay out the room in the same way that your venue is setup so you can clearly see where each table will be in relation to the others, the dance floor, bar, etc. 

    I had to give a list of the people sitting at each table and what their meal selection was to my venue and doing the seating chart this way enabled me to export it all to Excel and email that directly to my event coordinator.  No paper or post-its required! 

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from noitpec. Show noitpec's posts

    Re: Seating Chart

    I don't think you behaved very well at that reception, Mrs. O.  Why did you feel the need to apologize for your son and daughter-in-law? 

    You probably hurt their feelings on their wedding day.   Why did you want to check the seating arrangement?  
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from Winter2011Bride. Show Winter2011Bride's posts

    Re: Seating Chart

    I used an Excel spreadsheet and it went very smoothly, though we only had about 82 people.  My DH and I sat by ourselves and then we had 10 tables.
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from pinkkittie27. Show pinkkittie27's posts

    Re: Seating Chart

    see, my parents are divorced, but it wasn't messy and it had been over 10 years by the time I got married, so they did both sit at the head table with DH, the in-laws, and me. Dinner only lasted about 45 mins and we didn't do speeches, so it really wasn't awkward at all.

    once you think about the realistic time frame of how long people will be sitting together, some of the "oh they can't sit together" thoughts start to dissipate. Unless these people are known to cause scenes, chances are they can make it through dinner making polite small talk. Most mature adults can.
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from ALF72. Show ALF72's posts

    Re: Seating Chart

    In Response to Re: Seating Chart:
    [QUOTE]see, my parents are divorced, but it wasn't messy and it had been over 10 years by the time I got married, so they did both sit at the head table with DH, the in-laws, and me. Dinner only lasted about 45 mins and we didn't do speeches, so it really wasn't awkward at all. once you think about the realistic time frame of how long people will be sitting together, some of the "oh they can't sit together" thoughts start to dissipate. Unless these people are known to cause scenes, chances are they can make it through dinner making polite small talk. Most mature adults can.
    Posted by pinkkittie27[/QUOTE]

    You are very lucky.  My ILs had been divorced for close to 30 years [count 'em 30] at that point.  Both had since been remarried more than 1x.  FIL would be just fine sitting at the same table, but MIL would have gone nuts.  I trusted DH on this one. His brothers and SIL both backed him up on this point.  We actually also didn't invite FIL's wife b/c it would have been incredibly awkward, scenes would have been had even though FIL and MIL had been divorced for 20+ years when FIL met his current wife, and neither DH nor his brothers wanted her there for reasons I don't want to go into.  I wasn't happy about it, but he knows his family dynamics better than I do.  His dad was fine w/ it too, as was his wife.  We just did the separate table thing and it worked out swimmingly.
     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: Seating Chart

    I put parties that could not be split up on the post its (not individuals) and stuck them to the counter grouped by 6 - 8 (8 if possible) given our venue's tables had 8 places.  It's imperative that you find out how many people can be seated per table before you start or you'll literally have to do it all twice if you guess wrong.

    Putting couples and families on the same post it saves a lot of effort - it's not like a couple would ever be seated at different tables, anyway.

     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from pinkkittie27. Show pinkkittie27's posts

    Re: Seating Chart

    In Response to Re: Seating Chart:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: Seating Chart : You are very lucky.  My ILs had been divorced for close to 30 years [count 'em 30] at that point.  Both had since been remarried more than 1x.  FIL would be just fine sitting at the same table, but MIL would have gone nuts.  I trusted DH on this one. His brothers and SIL both backed him up on this point.  We actually also didn't invite FIL's wife b/c it would have been incredibly awkward, scenes would have been had even though FIL and MIL had been divorced for 20+ years when FIL met his current wife, and neither DH nor his brothers wanted her there for reasons I don't want to go into.  I wasn't happy about it, but he knows his family dynamics better than I do.  His dad was fine w/ it too, as was his wife.  We just did the separate table thing and it worked out swimmingly.
    Posted by ALF72[/QUOTE]

    I'm sorry to hear that. that's really a shame when two adults can't just put aside their personal issues for one day and focus on being there for someone else.
    i can't imagine having kids with someone and honestly expecting to never see them at any family functions ever again, and for my kids to have to play musical. chairs to spare me a little inconvenience. it's totally irrational.

     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from LindaO1MrsO1. Show LindaO1MrsO1's posts

    Re: Seating Chart

    In Response to Re: Seating Chart:
    [QUOTE]I don't think you behaved very well at that reception, Mrs. O.  Why did you feel the need to apologize for your son and daughter-in-law?  You probably hurt their feelings on their wedding day.   Why did you want to check the seating arrangement?  
    Posted by noitpec[/QUOTE]
    I think I behaved very well at my son's reception.  I explained to my friends that when I reviewed the seating chart that I was not aware that there were actually two sides to the reception area - with the band & dance area between the two areas. And, since they were good friends they understood.  I did not hurt my son and daughter-in-law's feelings as I was very, very discrete.  They just assumed that I was chatting with various guests - as a good hostess is supposed to do.  And, yes, my husband and I were also hosts for my son's wedding.  My husband and I contributed significant monies for the wedding.  We always expected to do that for our son and did that.  In terms of checking out the seating arrangement, I have been a professional planner for most of my career.  An important part of being a planner is to review any venue to determine if it is correctly set-up for the specific meeting.  I had expected to do the same for my son's wedding - and he would have expected me to do that.  Due to adverse weather conditions, we had to make several venue changes - and I was not able to review all of them.  I felt my primary duty that night was being a hostess until the bride's parents arrived.  The bride's parents did not arrive until about an hour after the cocktail hour began.  Since the bride's parents were very late in arriving, my husband, I, his brother/sister-in-law, acted as hosts/hostesses.  Please let me know if you have any other questions.  I will be happy to answer them
     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from LindaO1MrsO1. Show LindaO1MrsO1's posts

    Re: Seating Chart

    The response I posted was not in response to the original poster's question.  It was in direct response to a comment posted by "noitpec".  I never intended that it should be posted as a response to the original poster's question.
     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from ash. Show ash's posts

    Re: Seating Chart

    Way past wedding planning, but for my daughters' Bat Mitzvahs I used an excel spreadsheet.  I used the same excel spreadsheet for everything--invitation list, seating chart, who hadn't RSVP'ed, table arrangements.  I started out by adding people to the list by grouping them in the way that I knew them (family friends, my friends from college, cousins, etc) and it was very easy that way.  Plus you can save several version of it and sort it by table.  Plus I didn't leave any one out.

    If you want to involve mother and mother in law, let them seat the people they know/invited (family members, their friends).  I'm not a total control freak, but I would be leery about handing the whole thing over to someone else.

     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from Chiclet831. Show Chiclet831's posts

    Re: Seating Chart

    I used an Excel spreadsheet for my seating charts too. I was actually surprised how easy it was once I got into it. I knew about the "dance floor divide" so I made all my family/friends even numbers and all DH's family/friends odd (so my aunts and uncles who like to get drunk were sitting on the opposide side of the room as the bar) and just put people together. I ended up with one table of randoms and some tables that weren't full. (For example, DH's family sat in 3 tables of 8 rather than 2 tables of 10 and a mixed table of 4 plus 6 people they might not know.) Every table had at least two couples who knew each other. I don't think anyone had any problems with the seating arrangements. At least, no one said anything to me about them! 

    Good luck!
     
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