computer versus hand calligraphy

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from Epigal. Show Epigal's posts

    computer versus hand calligraphy

    What are your opinions on computerized calligraphy? I thought I really wanted hand calligraphy, but the prices I'm finding are aboue $2-3 per envelope, while computer calligraphy is about $1-2 per envelope. The samples that I've seen look fine, but I was wondering if anyone has used computerized calligraphy before? Does it really make a difference? If I'm going to pay for someone to do the calligraphy, I want to make sure it doesn't look like Microsoft Word printed at home...


    Also, has anyone used JR Rosen Studio in Quincy for calligraphy?
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from jasmine09. Show jasmine09's posts

    Re: computer versus hand calligraphy

    I used http://afineletter.com/ for my calligraphy and they were fantastic.  It is hand-done (NOT computer), looked gorgeous, and the pricing is the same or cheaper than the other computer-done calligraphy I saw advertised.  We had the Georgian font which was only $1.15 for both inner and outer envelopes (85 cents for outer only).  It looked great.  They do fine penmanship for as little as 40 cents.  Turnaround was quick, and the work was lovely and professional looking.  


     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from LilSprout. Show LilSprout's posts

    Re: computer versus hand calligraphy

    How's your own handwriting?  Even if your handwriting is only so-so, a calligraphy pen can do wonders.  I bought a calligraphy pen (at Paper Source) about 2 months before my wedding invites went out, practiced a lot, and did my own invites.  Obviously not professional, but a helluva lot nicer than from the computer.  (I personally think computer printed calligraphy is cheesey but that's my own opinion...I'd much rather receive an invite with less-nice handwriting than see my name printed by the impersonal computer.) 
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from lucy7368. Show lucy7368's posts

    Re: computer versus hand calligraphy

    I tend to think that, if you're going to have computer-printed calligraphy, you could save loads of money by downloading a nice font and doing it yourself.  The whole point of paying someone to do it is to have it done by hand.

    But as far as how it *looks* I don't care.  I get an envelope, verify it's for me (usually) rip it open, and throw it away.  I rarely take a quarter second to register how my name is on the envelope.
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from Peonie. Show Peonie's posts

    Re: computer versus hand calligraphy

    In Response to Re: computer versus hand calligraphy:
    I used http://afineletter.com/ for my calligraphy and they were fantastic.  It is hand-done (NOT computer), looked gorgeous, and the pricing is the same or cheaper than the other computer-done calligraphy I saw advertised.  We had the Georgian font which was only $1.15 for both inner and outer envelopes (85 cents for outer only).  It looked great.  They do fine penmanship for as little as 40 cents.  Turnaround was quick, and the work was lovely and professional looking.  
    Posted by jasmine09


    Jasmine, that pricing is incredible. I just looked at their website. Were you nervous at all about sending your envelopes away?
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from jasmine09. Show jasmine09's posts

    Re: computer versus hand calligraphy

    Yup Peonie--they were great to work with!  I wasn't nervous about mailing the stuff.  You could always buy shipping insurance, but if using a normal mail carrier, I think the probability that your package gets lost is very low.  Their work looks beautiful, and they let us send them the specific ink color we wanted them to use (navy blue), because they only stock black ink.  I highly recommend them.  They did all of our invitations and place cards.  They accommodated a very tight timeline on the place cards with no problems at all (even though the daughter was due to have her baby the week we needed the place cards done!--it is a mother/daughter team).
     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: computer versus hand calligraphy

    I agree with lucy in that if you do think you'll go with the computer why not go with a nice, scritpty font?  I like the clear address labels; I just used them on my in-law's 50th wedding anniversary party invitations, and they liked how they came out. 

    To answer your question, yes, computerized calligraphy will look different than hand done because calligraphers use special pens with nibs (tips) they dip in ink.  The shape of the letters, of course, can be produced by a printer, but not the way the ink and nib indents and stains the paper.

    I just hand-wrote ours in nice, legible cursive, fwiw.
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from Peonie. Show Peonie's posts

    Re: computer versus hand calligraphy

    Thank you, Jasmine! I saved their website to my favorites. Good to know about the ink, I would want it to be in a raspberry color. Where can you buy calligraphy pens? I am assuming Paper Source?

    Kar, you must have beautiful handwriting. My cursive is awful. :(
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: computer versus hand calligraphy

    Well, I wouldn't say beautiful, but it was, apparently, legible 'cause everyone got theirs, and I'd be comfortable saying it was "pretty."   I was glad I had extra envelopes for the names with Qs or Zs.  :)
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from jasmine09. Show jasmine09's posts

    Re: computer versus hand calligraphy

    Peonie--I can't remember where we bought the ink.  We actually just bought ink refills that they could use in existing pens, rather than buying calligraphy markers.  My husband liked the look of traditional pen & ink, so that is why we went that route.  We bought them either at an art supply store in Central Square (now out of business) or at a pen and stationary store in Copley Square or Prudential.  I remember shopping for the ink; I just can't remember where we ended up finding it.  Papersource would be a good place to try, but we didn't look there.  If you contact the calligraphers, they may give you more specific instructions.
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: computer versus hand calligraphy

    If you are learning calligraphy just to do your invitations, I highly recommend going with felt tipped pens, NOT formal caligraphy pens, nibs, and India ink.  I've done the nibs.  It's messy and difficult.  If you are lefthanded, completely forget about it.  You WILL get your hand in the very wet ink and make a huge mess.  As my mom used to say, "Guess how I know."
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from jasmine09. Show jasmine09's posts

    Re: computer versus hand calligraphy

    Yes, well, my advice was for if you are sending ink to a professional calligrapher.  And, we didn't send them the ink pots that you dip pen into; we sent fountain pen refills. They seemed comfortable with this system; I presume it is how they usually do the work.  They would have also accepted a calligraphy marker from us, but we sent ink refills.

    If you are doing it yourself, go ahead with the felt tip pen...  I addressed our save the dates myself in my best cursive using a fountain pen, and I think they came out decently.  I didn't try to do calligraphy though.  
     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: computer versus hand calligraphy

    Oh, I missed that was for a professional, sorry, Jas.  Absolutely, if you are PAYING for a calligrapher, ensure that they DO use "real" calligraphy equipment, not felt tipped pens.  The look is dramatically different.

    If you are used to writing with a fountain pen, it might not be a total disaster to try calligraphy, but there is quite a difference between a standard fountain pen tip and wider calligraphy one.  With a calligraphy nib you can tear the paper, stutter along and spray ink all over your envelope and yourself, etc.  It's harder than anyone might assume.
     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from cosmogirl. Show cosmogirl's posts

    Re: computer versus hand calligraphy

    You can buy calligraphy pens at any crafts store like A.C. Moore.

    I love that people are typing envelopes and calling it "computer calligraphy".  What a joke.  If you're going to do that, just do it yourself and run them through your office printer. 

    I would rather see an envelope in someone's own handwriting than something printed.

    Frankly, when I see a calligraphied envelope, I think "someone has too much money."  Just my opinion. 
     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from MissWolff. Show MissWolff's posts

    Re: computer versus hand calligraphy

    I know there are conflicting views on this but..

    I used afineletter.com and the invites came out beautifully.  My handwriting is awful and I didn't like the look of labels.

    Just my 2 cents.
     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from whatawagSBNy. Show whatawagSBNy's posts

    Re: computer versus hand calligraphy

       The idea of hand written being superior to   computer printed ones, cited in etiquette books,  comes from the idea that the bride of family, or B & G are adding a personal touch, taking the time and presumably, thinking of you.

        Once you decide to have them done by a professional, then there is no personal touch  logic  ( which I am not objecting to)  , who cares if it is personally done by an employee?

       So if you have time to personally address your own, how nice.

       But if not, running 1 envelope at a time through a printer and coming out with a clear print , legible to postal machines,  and attractive font  seems perfectly acceptable to me.

        And also - abbreviations were once thought to be slang (not polite) and Lazy  and lower class.
        But after fifty years, as has been pointed out, even Royalty and diplomats now use standard Postal Abbreviations,  and commonly accepted others.  So if 1081 Massachusetts Avenue looks a mess, and 1081 Massachusetts Ave. fits, it is a matter of personal style.  I personally think anyone who writes

    Even the most meticulously neat person has trouble keeping a line straight when all the words are long, unless you start way off center.  Which looks odd.

    So use reasonable abbreviations.  Be like royalty.
     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from Scorpio75. Show Scorpio75's posts

    Re: computer versus hand calligraphy

    I do like fancy fonts but I also like what is economical.  I did use clear lables and a nice font for our invites.  I also printed my invites as well, so all of the written items (program, invite, rsvp, envelope, belly band and seating cards) all were in the same font and had the same RGB value.  Did anyone notice that besides me, I can pretty confidently say no they did not, but it made me feel good.

    The lables were not a time saver because I took my time to make sure that the ink dried before I took them off each sheet to affix them to the envelopes.  I also made sure that I had clean hands and work surface.  I also took my time and centered them and layed them out slowly so there were no air bubbles.  They looked pretty darn good to me, and if you looked yes you could see it was a lable, but most people just rip it off and then forget about it.

    I liked the lables because I could easily proof it before I committed to print it so that cut down on transcription errors.  It also allowed my addresses to be legible, I used a slightly larger font (and my color was a dark color so it was easy to read) to make it easier to read as well.

    If you like the look of calligraphy and it is in your budget I would say go for it.  I cannot guarentee that many people will remember it but if it makes you feel good like my labels worked for me then do it.  Ignore those that say that it looks like you have too much money, or that it is impersonal.
     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from whatawagSBNy. Show whatawagSBNy's posts

    Re: computer versus hand calligraphy

       If you had an attractive finished addressed envelope, what is to criticise.

    Those old commercial style labels and fonts are  declassee, and I understand why people boo something that might just say occupant if you look closely.    But now the options for DIY are terrific.

       I always thought, oh labels, fast work.  But watching people do it in a sheltered workshop, I found out how meticulous the work must be to do it as you did, Scorpio.
     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from bostonslp. Show bostonslp's posts

    Re: computer versus hand calligraphy

    I think there is nothing wrong with the computerized version.  IMO, one envelope goes in the trash and the other is for you.  Both are for the mailman. 

    We didn't want to waste money here so I just printed them on wrap-around labels that I got for free on-line.  They were really cute and we didnt' need envelopes to return to use because we did postcards. 

    But of coure, like everything else wedding related, it's what is important to you and your FI that matters most and that's where the $$ should go. 

     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from Epigal. Show Epigal's posts

    Re: computer versus hand calligraphy

    Thanks all!

    Jasmine I just looked at afineletter.com, and their prices are great! That might be the way to go - hand calligraphy at a computerized price.

    I agree that it's defintely more cost-effective to print your own at home instead of paying someone to do "computer calligraphy", but after a disaster trying to feed save-the-date envelopes into my temperamental, old-school printer, I won't dare try to print the wedding invitation envelopes! I ended up addressing the save-the-dates myself, and actually I really like addressing envelopes (what can I say...), but I got vetoed for the wedding invitations.  Maybe I'll invest in a nice calligraphy pen and try again...

     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from Epigal. Show Epigal's posts

    Re: computer versus hand calligraphy

    Summer2010 - would you mind sending me the contact info for your calligrapher? I don't know how to send you an individual message on this thing...
     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from judet. Show judet's posts

    Re: computer versus hand calligraphy

    I've been a calligrapher for over 25 years, before there were computers used for calligraphy. If you're looking for cartridge ink for Shaeffer pens( which I bought at AC Moore's), you can get the cartridges online, just google the color you want and the kind of pen you're using. Buy more than you think you'll need, I did my niece's wedding ( 183 invites) and used 2 packages of 8 cartridges each.  I agree with the other posters, bottles of ink and nibs are NOT the way to go. I've used  cartridges for my calligraphy and have always had good luck.
     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: computer versus hand calligraphy

    Cartridges are easier than dipping in a jar of ink, for sure, but in the hands of a novice can still make a big mess.  I'd totally warn against doing real caligraphy with ink, cartridges, or even felt tipped pens yourself unless you already know how. 
     
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