negotiation etiquette?

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from Peonie. Show Peonie's posts

    Re: negotiation etiquette?

    First of all, no vendor should be offended by being asked to negotiate any pricing, that is unprofessional behavior. My fiance and I have negotiated everything in our planning process so far. We even got the Westin in Waltham to drop their package by $10 pp, so it is possible. And for our photographer, he was a gem when we started that conversation, and whipped up an awesome, almost customized package within our budget.

    To be completely honest, I would walk away. If he/she is going to act like this so early in the process, who knows what he/she will be like throughout your planning, and even on your wedding day. The last thing you want to deal with is someone who is going to be "upset" with you. There are so many amazing photographers out there who WILL work with you and your budget, trust me on this one.

    Good luck! :)
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: negotiation etiquette?

    It should not be off limits to any vendor.  If the photographer is so insecure as to not allow for a respectful discussion of the flexibility of her prices, she's immature and probably going to be a pain to deal with.  That's not to suggest you should write her off.  If you love her work and can afford her prices (deciding that you'll spend less on something else, for instance, to stay within budget), keep her.  If you really can't afford her and/or her attitude has turned you off enough that you don't think you can smile in front of her camera, find someone else.

    If your FH was as respectful as he says and has decent communication skills that you've witnessed in every other situation, you shouldn't have to question whether he was respectful this time.  If he was as he says, the vendor was out of line responding poorly.  The worst that can happen is a vendor says something like, "I can appreciate your need to stay within budget, but given my expenses I cannot afford to have flexibility in my pricing."
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from elmirag. Show elmirag's posts

    Re: negotiation etiquette?

    I agree with the first 2 responses. In this economy (i hate that line!) but it's true- in this economy, everything is open to negotiation. it can't hurt to ask, and if a vendor is THAT upset with asking, then i, too, would walk away. maybe this photographer is the "artist" type who thinks their is no negotiation for their art, i don't know. but to get upset and emotional? just silly, IMO. 
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from lucy7368. Show lucy7368's posts

    Re: negotiation etiquette?

    I would probably walk away.  Like Kar said, if she absolutely has no wiggle room in her pricing, she could have just said so politely.  There's no reason to get upset about it.

    At the very least, you should look at a few other vendors to see if there's one you like as much that might be easier to work with.
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from trex509. Show trex509's posts

    Re: negotiation etiquette?

    We tried to negotiate with all of our vendors and were mostly successful.  In some cases, pricing was fixed and the vendor told us so in a professional way.  Which was fine, we respect that, and we hired them anyway.  I always feel it never hurts to ask.

    However, we also did this all over email, so it was a little easier than discussing over the phone.  I agree with the others, the photog should have been able to take your request politely and not get upset.  (Unless you guys insulted her by asking for WAY too much to the point where it was insulting.  I can understand that because it can make her feel like you don't value her work.) 

    Anyway, if you feel the relationship is stressed, I'd look for another vendor anyway.  You will be spending a lot of time with your photographer that day, so you either have to make sure there are no hard feelings after what happened or find someone else.  The last thing you want is a stressful attitude on your wedding day.
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: negotiation etiquette?

    Even in a good economy, negotiation is acceptable and expected.
     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from easydoesit2. Show easydoesit2's posts

    Re: negotiation etiquette?

    The only person allowed to be a Diva on your wedding day is you.  If you or your husband upset her on The Day, what is she going to do; walk out on you?  Then what?  You have enough to worry about: just walk away from Lady Snowden.
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from Peonie. Show Peonie's posts

    Re: negotiation etiquette?

    In Response to Re: negotiation etiquette?:
    The only person allowed to be a Diva on your wedding day is you.  If you or your husband upset her on The Day, what is she going to do; walk out on you?  Then what?  You have enough to worry about: just walk away from Lady Snowden.
    Posted by easydoesit2

    I love it! Easy, can I quote you on that?
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from nibsfeld. Show nibsfeld's posts

    Re: negotiation etiquette?

    In Response to Re: negotiation etiquette?:
    The only person allowed to be a Diva on your wedding day is you.  Posted by easydoesit2


    ha!  love it.

    thanks, everyone, for your comments--you confirmed what i was suspecting.  i think trex is right & she may have been offended by how much we asked--and the tactic to take is probably "we love your work but it's over our budget, can you help us out?" rather than "our budget is #, can we have xyz?"  oh well, lesson learned.

    has anyone else gone practically blind looking at wedding photos online?  after a while i lose my critical eye and everybody's pictures look exactly the same and i can't tell who's a good photographer or not. (AND i start thinking i bought the wrong wedding dress... sigh.)
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from kargiver. Show kargiver's posts

    Re: negotiation etiquette?

    Even if he asked in a less than "perfect" way, she should have been professional enough to handle it graciously.

     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from trex509. Show trex509's posts

    Re: negotiation etiquette?

    Yes, I did go blind looking at photographers.  I have a list of about 25 whose websites I looked at.  (i can post it if you need to look for alternatives!)

    When negotiating, I find that with some people you can get away with the "this is what I want for this price", like the venue.  I kind of feel like they are more used to it since they do this frequently and the person you are negotiating with is not the business owner.

    With photographers, videographers, make-up people, etc who own their own business, I feel like they are can be more sensitive since this is their company.  So in these cases, I would say "we really love your work, but we our budget is this, what can you do in this amount?".  That way they put together a package that is reasonable for their effort.   However if you say "I want your pakcage B which is $2500 but I want it for $1500", they are more likely to get offended and feel like you don't value their efforts.  As Kar said, they should just professionally say "I'm sorry, I can't do that, but I can do THIS", but it does'nt always work that way.

    Anyway, don't feel bad about it!  Just move on!  You will find someone awesome who fits your budget, and finding a good personality match is also important for the photographer.  Better you know her personality now than later!
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from sarabelle1985. Show sarabelle1985's posts

    Re: negotiation etiquette?

    In Response to negotiation etiquette?:

    I agree with trex, negotiation is fine in some cases but not if you're asking for too much.  It's easy for the Westin to offer a discount because they're such a huge corporation.

     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from bleeble. Show bleeble's posts

    Re: negotiation etiquette?

    The only reason negotiation on prices should be out of the question is if you have a Saturday wedding between May and November. On those Saturdays, vendors can charge their regular rate because that's when the vast majority of people get married in New England. No need for him to get upset about it, just be straight- forward. Maybe the guy felt uncomfortable explaining himself. I'm sure you fiance' is not the first person to ever ask this of the vendor.
     

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