Yesterday's Letter (Education)

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from TwoCentDonation. Show TwoCentDonation's posts

    Re: Yesterday's Letter (Education)

    In Response to Re: Yesterday's Letter (Education):
    To weigh in on the 'do you need liberal arts' debate.  I went to an engineering school that didn't force a lot of distribution requirements on us.  My humanities specialty was in music.  Other than an essay that was mocked at length around the fraternity house ('Why Country Western Music Saved the Nation' - an analysis of lyrics from the Vietnam era), my humanities courses were unremarkable.
    Posted by Loud-Mouthed-Broad


    Well, your essay title may have been made fun of at a liberal arts college, too ;)

    But, seriously, having learned more about the role of folk music and that folk and country are related, I think your essay sounds interesting.

    And, on a related note, I sometimes wonder what it must feel like to be an English prof at MIT......  Do you feel like a missionary in the wilderness?  Do you feel bored by all the tech-inspired metaphors and similes you read?  Do you feel frustrated by students feeling that your class is unimportant compared to calculus and electrical circuits?  Does part of your soul die each semester you teach Technical Writing 201?  Do you take the Red Line to Harvard just so you can walk around and pretend you teach at a school where students love the humanities?
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from Butterflyz. Show Butterflyz's posts

    Re: Yesterday's Letter (Education)

    That's an interesting question TwoCent, I've wondered myself as one of the best practicing historians of the American Revolution/Early Republic in the country, Pauline Maier teaches at MIT. I can't imagine why, other than possibly, the lack of interested students/grad students makes it easier for her to get her own work done while still getting to teach...
     
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    Re: Yesterday's Letter (Education)

    In Response to Re: Yesterday's Letter (Education):
    That's an interesting question TwoCent, I've wondered myself as one of the best practicing historians of the American Revolution/Early Republic in the country, Pauline Maier teaches at MIT. I can't imagine why, other than possibly, the lack of interested students/grad students makes it easier for her to get her own work done while still getting to teach...
    Posted by Butterflyz


    The MIT grads I know are pretty well rounded academically (socially some of them are a little out there).  I don't think that it's a hardship to teach humanities at that particular school
     
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    Re: Yesterday's Letter (Education)

    Interesting LMB. I know a couple MIT people, though only graduate students, no undergrads, and so my impression of MIT's coverage of the humanities may very well be skewed. Still, they don't seem to offer a general History graduate degree, only one linked with the history of technology or the like, and Maier doesn't really touch that kind of history so I'd imagine she doesn't have any graduate students to advise, and I can't imagine there are many undergraduate history majors there. I could certainly be wrong though.
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from Jim-in-Littleton. Show Jim-in-Littleton's posts

    Re: Yesterday's Letter (Education)

    In Response to Re: Yesterday's Letter (Education):
    In Response to Re: Yesterday's Letter (Education) :  And, on a related note, I sometimes wonder what it must feel like to be an English prof at MIT......  Do you feel like a missionary in the wilderness?  Do you feel bored by all the tech-inspired metaphors and similes you read?  Do you feel frustrated by students feeling that your class is unimportant compared to calculus and electrical circuits?  Does part of your soul die each semester you teach Technical Writing 201?  Do you take the Red Line to Harvard just so you can walk around and pretend you teach at a school where students love the humanities?
    Posted by TwoCentDonation



    One of my best friends went to Harvard and got her degree in Computer Science - not exactly what Harvard is known for but apparently not so out-of-the-ordinary either.

    MIT also has a huge rare books library (my youngest sister worked there for a few years) with thousands of books of classic lit.  Whodathunkit?
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from JeepersCripes. Show JeepersCripes's posts

    Re: Yesterday's Letter (Education)

    LOL- that is probably exactly true TwoCentz! And since the last Car Show had all these cars in some weirded out colors and designs, its come to fruition.
     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from JeepersCripes. Show JeepersCripes's posts

    Re: Yesterday's Letter (Education)

    I hope Jeeps Jr goes to MIT.
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from TwoCentDonation. Show TwoCentDonation's posts

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    In Response to Re: Yesterday's Letter (Education):
    I hope Jeeps Jr goes to MIT.
    Posted by Jeepers-Cripes


    Click & Clack, the Tappet brothers did.
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from reindeergirl. Show reindeergirl's posts

    Re: Yesterday's Letter (Education)

    My friend has been learning First Nation languages as MIT. Wouldn't a thought it, but the program is there.

    My Latin professor, FT at another uni, is an MIT adjunct teaching Latin literature.

    There are all kinds of nifty programs and courses tucked away at MIT.
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from JeepersCripes. Show JeepersCripes's posts

    Re: Yesterday's Letter (Education)

    I LOVE LOVE LOVE the Tappet Brothers. Its part of my drive to NYC on Saturday mornings. 

    And best part??? They prounounce it "Porsha" not Porch ;)
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from JeepersCripes. Show JeepersCripes's posts

    Re: Yesterday's Letter (Education)

    "Everyone is a genius. But if you judge a fish on its ability to climb a tree, it will live its whole life believing that it is stupid."
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from Butterflyz. Show Butterflyz's posts

    Re: Yesterday's Letter (Education)

    I know this thread is like a week old at this point, but I was alerted to this today in the wake of the sad passing of Steve Jobs. Thought it was appropriate to post here:

    http://www.nytimes.com/roomfordebate/2011/03/20/career-counselor-bill-gates-or-steve-jobs
     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from TwoCentDonation. Show TwoCentDonation's posts

    Re: Yesterday's Letter (Education)

    In Response to Re: Yesterday's Letter (Education):
    I know this thread is like a week old at this point, but I was alerted to this today in the wake of the sad passing of Steve Jobs. Thought it was appropriate to post here: http://www.nytimes.com/roomfordebate/2011/03/20/career-counselor-bill-gates-or-steve-jobs
    Posted by Butterflyz


    I read Jobs's commencement speech to Stanford grads, and he talked about how if he had never decided to drop in on a calligraphy class at Reed he wouldn't have had all those fonts on the Mac.  He then said that you can't see how the dots connect looking forward, only by looking at the past, so you just need to trust that at some point the dots will connect.

    I also read in one of the tributes to him that Jobs liked living where "liberal arts meets tech."
     
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