Elimination of early decision

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from BostonDotCom. Show BostonDotCom's posts

    Elimination of early decision

    Since eliminating the early decision option for admissions, Harvard, Princeton, and the University of Virginia all reported a record high number of applicants. Do you think having one general application date provides a more diverse application pool, as Harvard and other schools hope it will? Do you think it was this admissions change, or Harvard's announcement that it was granting additional financial aid, that was more responsible for increasing the school's applicants? Would you be discouraged from applying to a school with an early decision option? Do you think this will encourage more schools to have one application date?
     
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    Elimination of early decision

    I've seen this issue from two vantage points:

    I coordinate local alumni interviews for a top tier university and this year I saw a dramatic spike in my area requests for early action interviews - about 4x the regular amount. We have always had a non-binding early action program where the student was notified in December but still allowed to apply to other places and make a decision to attend in the spring.

    In the fall/winter of 2003/04 I recieved 7 early action interview requests and 41 regular notification requests. This fall/winter I recived 31 early action to 20 regular notification.

    The other view is that of my niece who applied early action to all of her colleges (and she applied to many more schools than I did 20 years ago). For some, she applied early because the major she is interested in required it. But she also applied early action to all the other schools without that program - so I think it's a trend. She's part of the 'baby boomlet' where there's a lot of competition for those slots combined with a trend to apply to a ton of schools.

     

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