Home schoolin helo needed

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from reindeergirl. Show reindeergirl's posts

    Home schoolin helo needed

    Readers,áI will need to come up with a solid plan that will pass muster, especially in light of the fact that:áI don't have an education degreeThe new California law will probably be a test case for the rest of the countryáLord knows how I will swing it financially, and who I can get to to teachámy childámath.áThe bullyingáin her schooláis outrageous; the teachers don't see it, and they favor the students they've had, instead of making the new students feel comfortable and safe.á She comes home with a new incident of being bullied a few times a week.á Her teacher does not believe her, because teacher has horse blinders on.áWe are new to the community, and have been made to feel less than welcome. I cannot fathom the degree of parochialism and provinciality here.áThe Principal surely must be overwhelmed - more than 600 students, and no vice principal to assist.áIf I pull her out now, without a home school plan in place, I get charged with truancy or neglect, right?áDo I need an attorney to defend a home-school plan for the fall?

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from bikes2work. Show bikes2work's posts

    Home schoolin helo needed

    reindeergirl,

    I don't know your situation in detail, but don't count yourself out just because you don't have an education degree.á My mom did not have an education degree, yet she home-schooled me from 3rd through 8th grade and my younger brother from Kindergarten through 8th grade.á We both went on to public high school, and then to four-year universities.á I attended Stanford University, and frankly, I think the fact that I was home-schooled worked in my favor in the admissions office; it provided a bit of the "diversity" they were looking for.

    That said, home-schooling is a lot of work.á It was a full-time job for my mother, choosing the curriculum, creating a schedule each day, etc.á Additionally, I'm fairly self-motivated to learn on my own, so that made her job easier.á Every kid is different so the challenges you face will be different.

    As to the legal details of your situation, I don't know.á We were home-schooled in California, and I see the situation regarding the court case there has complicated things...I hope the recent ruling is overturned.

    I would do some research at http://www.hslda.org/default.asp?bhcp=1

    They are devoted to defending the legal status of home-schooling around the country, and I'm sure if you call them they will have information on Massachusetts.

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from reindeergirl. Show reindeergirl's posts

    Home schoolin helo needed

    Thank you for your thoughts, Ferial.Parochial schools are out because we are an inter-faith family, and my former husband and I have an agreement in place that it would be "all or nothing" in regard to elementary education.á Additionally, I taught in a parochial school, and, I have to say, some of the parents are just plain insane regarding religion.As for private schools, even if we did get a scholarship (most will not give 100 percent), we can't afford them.á There is no money there, none.á If I could, I would take out a home equity loan on my condo, but ex husband left me with a credit rating in the toilet.I looked into the scholarship thing. The money isn't out there. As well, we don't have a car (and can't afford one right now) for transportation to and from school.But thanks.á I just wanted to let you know we considered these matters.

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from reindeergirl. Show reindeergirl's posts

    Home schoolin helo needed

    bikes2work,áThanks so much for sharing your experience - and for the link!á My girl is motivated when she gets to pursue her own projects (coming up with ideas, for example, for the butterfly exhibit for the Science Museum).á I am in grad school PT, in late afternoon and evenings, and in two of my classes, there isá a high school freshman and a high school senior.á Their towns allow them home-school credit for college courses, I thought that was a fine thing!I have indeed considered the time commitment.á Mine will be entering 5th grade, so that will be five years of home-schooling at the minimum.á Fortunately, this town has three high schools, to varying levels of challenge, from which to apply and choose: a vo-tech; a regular one; one similar to Boston Latin School.á But that still leaves five years ahead.I think my main concern right now is how we will pull it off financially, since ex-husband's child support is minimal, as is what is in my savings acct.á I feel she is too young (and young for her age) for me to go off five hours a day to a "mother's hours" job and leave her alone.á Any mother's hour's job salary will not compensate for babysitter pay - they cancel each other out.The home-schooled children I have met are delightful; wise beyond their years; kind to other children. My daughter is concerned about not having daily contact with groups of other children, and our city, for some odd reason I can't fathom, has playgrounds, but few children go.The alternative is this: I get an M.Ed. degree (I am in humanities now), and hope the next two years do not bring two much trauma to her at school.á Once with the M.Ed., I aim for employment in a community that has money to invest in its children, and said community taking children of its employees for nominal tuition.I am at a loss.á During my brief marriage I let my husband deal with the money, and he ploughed through what could have been about a decade's worth of private school tuition - or small condo elsewhere, not here.á It breaks my heart to send our daughter off to school there every day.á Besides, the bullying, she's not learning anything.á Homework is minimal (2 math problems 4x/weekly; 3 sheets of spelling all week - none involving critical thinking). I make up to her what I can, with my skills in literature, history and the arts, but I can't assist her with math.Thanks again so much for your story, and the link (which I will use). I'm grateful to you.

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from reindeergirl. Show reindeergirl's posts

    Home schoolin helo needed

    All reat ideas, thanksto much Antigone.� I would want a secular program, so I appreciate the heads-up.�Not worried so much about the time, as the money - lack of it.� She's too young to stay alone for even 4 - 5 hours while I sought out a PT job.

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from reindeergirl. Show reindeergirl's posts

    Home schoolin helo needed

    Thanks for your feedback.�Please go away and stay out of my thread.

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from reindeergirl. Show reindeergirl's posts

    Home schoolin helo needed

    The problem being, in addition to the bullying, she's getting no education there.� I spend as much time with her on creative and critical lessons as she is supposed to get in school.In addition, there is no "Homework Club" that many school districts have.� Most of the teachers are uninterested in picking up an extra $25 - $50/afternoon to tutor.You wrote:And bullying really sucks. I never told my parents that I was bullied in middle school. I was too embarassed because I blamed myself. But I learned to cope with it. Really.
    Yes, that happened to me, too.� Fifth through eight grades.� (In high school I was able to escape it.)� You ended up better than I did, apparently.� I believe that bullying directly contributed to my adult-onset depression.

     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from reindeergirl. Show reindeergirl's posts

    Home schoolin helo needed

    My child will not smoke because she has a mother who is an anti-smoking activist, and because I have indoctrinated her early.


    We can afford extra lessons at the museum, the Y, etc., but we can't afford forme to stay home, and she's too young for being left alone.

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from dsturdy5. Show dsturdy5's posts

    Home schoolin helo needed

    Home school works if the educator has the time, as others have said.� It sounds like you do.� I wish you luck.� As a public educator, I can say that when we get students (re)introduced to the school who have been home schooled, it is a crap shoot but you know the ones who were shown propper care for and who just threw work at their kids.�

    In addition, there is no "Homework Club" that many school districtshave.� Most of the teachers are uninterested in picking up an extra $25- $50/afternoon to tutor.

    As for the above comment, a lot of districts, mine included, have tutoring policies in place that strongly restrict who they may/not tutor for cash payments.� We may not tutor any student we have had or could have in our classroom.� Trust me, many of my collegues would love the extra money but are not able to do so.�

    The lack of homework club is too bad.� We do not have one at the elementary level but there is one at the middle school.�

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from cjachl. Show cjachl's posts

    Home schoolin helo needed

    I am just wondering what criteria you use to define "appropriate". I noticed that you mentioned private and parochial schools but not public or home-education. Do you care to expound on this?
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from cjachl. Show cjachl's posts

    Home schoolin helo needed

    I want to apologize, I did not realize that "educated" people did not expound on topics. Apparently I did not get the memo on that. I find your statistical analysis to be quite interesting. It appears that through your analysis you have reached conclusions on entire populations within our society. You then proceed to comment publically on your conclusions and make inferences based on these conclusions. Your conclusions were based on the wealth of data you accumulated on "perhaps half a dozen" individual students. Your conclusions/inferences were based on 4 or 5 or possibly as many as 6 students.Now mind you I have not been in a freshman statistics course in over twenty years, but I myself would not feel comfortable reaching a conclusion, and making inferences,�on an entire�population�with arguably limited data. In addition I would find it irresponsible if I used that "data" to comment publically on these populations, but that's just me.You also mentioned that a�couple �of your test-group, again the "perhaps half a dozen",� were "unable to function at any level". I find this confusing as I always believed that the only people "unable to function at any level" were dead.

     

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