special ed adults

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    special ed adults

    I have never encountered this problem before...help!!
    I needed an old tree removed from my yard, so I traded my tutoring services with a highly recommended tree remover. He is the best in the business, remarkable to watch, and an expert on trees and plants. During the winter he is light on jobs so he wants to become a lineman but needs to pass an aptitude test to become an apprentice. This is where my tutoring came in. I assessed him on the first day and found out he was at a third grade level in both reading and writing. The sample test was about a 7th grade level. He's 35, and a former special ed student.
    I wanted to see what his high school IEP gave him for modifications and due to his learning disability he had a reader and a writer. This meant that all his work and tests were read to him, and any essay he vocalized and someone else wrote for him. When I tutored him this way, he passed the sample test.
    He got tested again, as an adult, because IEP's expire after you finish your education. According to the test, his disability states that he continues to need a reader and writer.
    Here comes the problem:
    I researched and found that the apprentice program was run by a non-profit organization and was funded by the department of labor. The DOL, I thought, and according to section 81 of its laws, says that a minority includes someone with a non-job related disability and candidates with a non-job related disability must be considered and accomodated. I requested a reader and writer for his test and they sent me back a letter allowing him double time on his test. This is the equivalent of yelling at a non-speaking english student and expecting him to understand you because you're talking to him louder and slower. So I requested again, and again, and again, and even offered, for free, to be his reader and writer. They eventually stopped taking my calls or just telling me there was nothing else to do, take the extra time and take the test. He showed up for the test, and they refused to let him take it.
    My question...isn't that against the law? Can he file a lawsuit?
     
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    special ed adults

    His disability involves how he sees letters, to him they are not letters that are joined together to form a word.� Even repeated visual word recognition does not help as you may show him the word "work" and it is never the same visual that enters his brain.� So teaching pattern recognition doesn't work either.� You could give him two hours to read one sentence, he'll never be able to 'read' it, so extending the test time will not work with his disability.� It would be like trying to teach someone who is colorblind how to label colors that are red, you could give him all the time in the world and he'll never be able to do it.He did file a lawsuit.� It will of course take a lot longer than he can wait as he needed a job.� I predict that with the increases in special education that lots of children that become adults will face the same problem because it seems lots of jobs that never required a test are now requiring them.� My�conspiracy theory� is that it's a great way for employers to weed out a certain group of people.� �I guess time will tell what the effects will be.Thanks for the reply.

     

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