Bad idea, unless you like tax hikes

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    Bad idea, unless you like tax hikes

    This is a very�cynical way for cities and towns to increase your taxes.� Less and less prop 2.5 overrides are being approved.� So what is the solution for find the necessary revenue to fund the desired projects?� Better efficiency?� Cutbacks in other areas?� Nah, that would make too much sense, and mean the gov't actually cares about spending your money wisely.Instead�they are basically going to exempt a certain segment of the population from the tax increases, seniors making less than $60k in this case, so they won't be inclined to vote against the override.� What a bunch of horsesh!t.� Seniors are the most reliable anti-prop 2.5 override voters, so the legislature wants to divide and conquer the electorate by only making certain people face the tax increases.� This is basically and end run around prop 2.5, as Rep. Humason said.� It just seems a bit unfair to only tax certain segments of the population, in order to get untaxed segment to vote for tax increases.�� A perfect example of the government lookng out for its own interests, at the expense of working taxpayers.Please contact your senators to defeat this bill, or expect to see more overrides pass to hike your taxes.http://www.boston.com/news/local/articles/2008/02/29/critics_rap_prop_2_12_exemption_measure/Critics rap Prop. 2 1/2 exemption measureEmail|Print| Text size � + By Steve LeBlanc Associated Press / February 29, 2008 It's an all too familiar scene for the state's cash-strapped cities and towns. Families of school-age children push officials for a Proposition 2 1/2 property tax override to come up with money for a new school, library, or other big expense. When the vote comes, seniors on fixed incomes show up in droves to kill the measure.Now lawmakers are pushing a bill that would let cities and towns exempt seniors earning less than $60,000 a year from the overrides. Supporters say the bill is a tax break for seniors, but critics say it is just a way to help push through property tax increases.Yesterday, House lawmakers overwhelmingly approved the bill, which now heads to the Senate.The bill links the tax breaks to the property tax override itself, and that is irking some critics, who say the bill is just a way to entice seniors to look the other way."Seniors are our first line of defense against overrides," said Barbara Anderson of Citizens for Limited Taxation. "Senior citizens are defeating these overrides, and they are trying to give them a reason not to vote."The bill's sponsor, Representative Ruth Balser, said the bill would give local city councils, boards of aldermen, and town meeting members the option of giving lower-income seniors a tax break if voters adopt an override.The tax exemption would apply to homeowners 65 or older with an income of $60,000 or less, provided that their real estate taxes exceed 10 percent of their income.Republican lawmakers opposed the measure."This bill is a very cynical attempt to do an end-run around Proposition 2 1/2," said Representative Donald Humason, a Westfield Republican. "It will come back to bite us in the end."�

     
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    Bad idea, unless you like tax hikes

    ��� Okay, I am in my late 30s and do not have any kids (and do not plan to).� Does that mean I would be exempt from overrides as well?� I am a believer that if you live in the town, it is your obligation to pay taxes for the services that are no only beneficial to yourself and your family, but the other families in your community as well.� Does that mean I would vote yes on every override?� Of course not, but I would not rule it out either.�

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from axman96. Show axman96's posts

    Bad idea, unless you like tax hikes

    I am a believer that if you live in the town, it is your obligation to pay taxes for the services that are no only beneficial to yourself and your family, but the other families in your community as well.Of course, otherwise we'd have user fees for everything we do, which would be less cost effective overall.� But I can see how anyone, whether you have kids in school or not, might not be all that eager to vote for an override for a gleaming new, high tech, state of the art school, when a regular, more affordable public school would do just fine.Does that mean I would vote yes on every override?� Of course not, but I would not rule it out either.� People to tend to vote selfishly though, and their self interest may not be in line what might help out the community.� Which is fine though, to each his own.� Of course reasonable people can consider if the town doing a prop 2.5 override is a good idea for thetown, apart from their own situation.� But if the town has a bad reputation for fiscal mismanagement, you are going to find it hard for anyone to support overrides.� And that is why this bill is such a bad idea, because it will divide the resistance to tax hikes, by making them only affect certain people.� Prop 2.5 overrides should be a last resort.� I think this will encourage more of them, and discourage financial prudence, because city/town leaders will know that they have a better chance of�prop 2.5 overrides�passing without the senior citizens to vote agasinst them.� Since raising taxes will be easier, it keeps them from having to make the tough choices to keep spending at a reasonable level.�

     

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