This shouldn't be allowed

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from trublusu. Show trublusu's posts

    This shouldn't be allowed

    http://www.boston.com/news/local/massachusetts/articles/2008/02/11/mass_sex_offender_wins_10_million_from_scratch_ticket/

    And why isn't this guy in jail?

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from trublusu. Show trublusu's posts

    This shouldn't be allowed

    ??? Whose children read the news online? Your post doesn't make any sense at all.
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from frankjcapp. Show frankjcapp's posts

    This shouldn't be allowed

    And why isn't this guy in jail?


    Depends ... apparently he completed his sentance. The article wasn't clear if he was on parole - it only said CT officials might charge him cause he moved to MA without informing them (I'm not sure the portability of CT law into MA).

    I'm assuming you're not implying that the guy should be in jail because he won the lottery because he was a sex offender?

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from frankjcapp. Show frankjcapp's posts

    This shouldn't be allowed

    Hi Ken .. I will after a bit, Thanks

    Well, that's a question for the legislature. If they want to make sex offenses life sentances, they should and let's get some judicial review on it.

    While I think it's politic, having a sex offender manditory register while allowing drug dealers, murders and theives live quietly next door in anominity is offensive to me from a Constitutional basis. If these guys do the crime and the time, they should have as much chance as anyone else to integrate back into society.

    Actually, I would not be surprised if some legislative hack offered a statute to tatoo these guys on the forehead.

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from frankjcapp. Show frankjcapp's posts

    This shouldn't be allowed

    The con has paid his "debt" to society, so now they need to pay their actual debt to society.� I think that all cons should have some sort of garnished wage as part of their sentence, especiallly since it's the goal of the prison system to rehabilitate the offender.� Others have argued for that as well. The problem is that it's bad enough for ex-cons to get meaningful work out there ... the car washes and bottle washers of the world is pretty exclusively the haven for ex-cons.So, aside from CORI laws that severely, if not terminally, restrict their ability to earn a living, you now want to fine him which is the same as� making a X year sentance, X + debt for life sentance (the average cost of incarceration is between $23K and $26K per year. The average con is probably earning if that. What you're going to garnish is going to be miniscule as a percentage).The real problem is that we are sticking way too many people in jail. If you eliminated the non-violent offenders out of jail, you're going to reduce the prison population by close to 60%, which will translate into�close to a 50% reduction in society's cost.Personally, I don't believe the system does, nor can, rehabilitate it's population. Our system is nothing more than retribution for violation of a law(s).� On the other hand, drug rehab is certainly possible -- but outside of the confines of a jail. And that's where the real cost of our justice system lies.

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from ecafsc. Show ecafsc's posts

    This shouldn't be allowed

    While I think it's politic, having a sex offender manditory register while allowing drug dealers, murders and theives live quietly next door in anominity is offensive to me from a Constitutional basis. �Couple of things. I think many parents would be more concerned with a child molester living next door than a thief/drug dealer. Not sure there are too many KNOWN murderers living among society given that they usually get life. Given the choice of being robbed or having your child scarred for life due to being molested I think parents would pick the former.

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from ecafsc. Show ecafsc's posts

    This shouldn't be allowed

    You don't have to break a law to have a criminal record. You only have to be accused and arraigned.

    How many times have you been accused AND arraigned for doing absolutely nothing at all?

     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from ecafsc. Show ecafsc's posts

    This shouldn't be allowed

    Let me ask you if someone is convicted of urinating in public which makes them a sex offender, should they pay a heavier price than a murderer?

    Do they now? I believe a murderer goes to jail and in some cases for life. I believe a person pissing in public gets a fine in most cases. I have friends who were caught doing this and all they had to do was pay a fine. They never got pinned with a sex offender rap. So I would say they haven't paid a heavier price than murderers.

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from ecafsc. Show ecafsc's posts

    This shouldn't be allowed

    Bit of a different type of scar wouldn't you say? Unless you think a child getting molested holds the same weight as a person getting robbed. Carry on.
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from ecafsc. Show ecafsc's posts

    This shouldn't be allowed

    Ok. I would have thought it was commonsense but I'm not going to argue with you. �However, I can't say you're right, either.
    Mostly because it would kill you to do so ; )

     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from ecafsc. Show ecafsc's posts

    This shouldn't be allowed

    The BDC ruler has spoken people. As usual no one is up to snuff with the almighty Dante. We should all hang our heads in shame as we once again get scolded.
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from msts-1. Show msts-1's posts

    This shouldn't be allowed

    A guy urinating in public would not be incarcerated, would face a review board and probably not be required to register upon review. The problem with level 3 offenders are that they are deemed dangerous and most likely to reoffend. The logic of having a registry of dangerous recidivists boggles my mind. Using murder as a benchmark, the murderer will most likely be in prison for ten-fifteen years before he is paroled and is still under the control of the courts. A level three can finish his/her sentence in five to ten years and have no supervision and be let out into the population, hence the outrage when it happens again and the new neighbors didn't know who just moved in. Read the level 3 offenders on the Commonwealth registry. Looking at the dates of their convictions it looks like they celebrate freedom by committing another crime. I am not in favor of any registry. I am in favor of keeping dangerous people in prison. I think registries are intrusive and a detriment to getting ex-convicts back to work and into society. I even think that felons should be allowed guns as their rights are not forfeit forever. I asked a current Suffolk DA why the registries are necessary and why they can't keep people in prison longer and his answer made sense. He said that if sentencing was left to the public outcry, the death sentence would be given to the person who robbed you. The thing about the change in crime and more specifically, personal crime is that prior to the late '50's/early '60's, the criminal population kept to itself and left "civilians" alone. From what I have�read and heard from criminals of the earlier era, they confined violent crime to themselves and rapists and murderers were executed when convicted. The executions may not have prevented future murders by others but they did solve the problem with murderer/rapist ex-cons committing more crime.

     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from ecafsc. Show ecafsc's posts

    This shouldn't be allowed

    A home invasion where you're robbed at gunpoint and tied up for two days before anyone finds you?You been watching Law & Order marathons again? : )As�I already told you I didn't care to argue which is worse. Agree to disagree.

     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from trublusu. Show trublusu's posts

    This shouldn't be allowed

    How is it horrendous that I posted something that was already in the newpaper�? Oh, well, takes all kinds I suppose.To clarify my opinion� - I don't believe sex offenders or criminals in general should even be allowed to play the lottery unless they intend to pay the taxpayers back with their winnings for the tax money we spent on their trials and incarcerations.

     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from ecafsc. Show ecafsc's posts

    This shouldn't be allowed

    I don't believe sex offenders or criminals in general should even be allowed to play the lottery unless they intend to pay the taxpayers back with their winnings for the tax money we spent on their trials and incarcerations.

    Once they did the time and paid their debt and are back in society they have every right to buy a lottery ticket and every right to keep every penny of it.

     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from msts-1. Show msts-1's posts

    This shouldn't be allowed

    The level 3 offender has been scrutinized by law enforcement and psychological evaluation while in prison. Prior to release they are given this evaluation and that is what the sex offender review board uses in its determination. A rapist can be either level 2 or level 3 based on the boards evaluation of dangerousness and likelyhood to reoffend. It isn't my evaluation, its sytemic. My point is that they are dangerous, there is no method to keep them in jail and that using murderers as a benchmark doesn't work as they are usually confined for longer periods/life.

    My thinking was always if they were still dangerous, why let them out. Unfortunately, the sentencing comes before evaluation and nothing can then be done. As I wrote, sentencing is tough to change because popular sentiment would require all criminals to be locked up forever which is foolish. That is why I am against registries and the rampany use of CORI. It allows a virtual life sentence for all criminals who have served their apparent time.

    I am not sure I understand the difference between harming a stranger and one you know, especially in this persons case of sexual assault on a child under 14. I agree that people should be more careful but I also believe that there is an implied right not to be a victim of crime. It isn't my daughters fault to be playing by herself in the front yard and be kidnapped and raped. It isn't her fault to visit a neighbor and be raped. It isn't my fault to leave my house unlocked and be robbed. It is the criminals fault.

    On the other post, Al Capone, Machine un Kelly and the Prohibition wars were very similar to gang warfare now. They were mostly confined to criminal on criminal and criminal on police and very few "civilians" were involved.

     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from trublusu. Show trublusu's posts

    This shouldn't be allowed

    That was someone posting as me thinking they were being funny.��If you look at the screen name you will see it is different. It was very distasteful, which makes me think it was a male poster.

     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from trublusu. Show trublusu's posts

    This shouldn't be allowed

    I never understood that phrase " paying debt to society" who and what exactly are they paying? The only person who suffers long term effects of a crime are the victims, not the criminals.
     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from frankjcapp. Show frankjcapp's posts

    This shouldn't be allowed

    �I'm just saying that they shoudn't have the "priviledge" of being able to accept millions of dollars in lottery money. So, are you advocating that anyone convicted of a crime should have a life sentance?Because, that is what you're saying. Any deprivation of a priviledge and/or right is a punishment in our society.��[You realize a traffic ticket is technically a conviction??]

     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from trublusu. Show trublusu's posts

    This shouldn't be allowed

    Yes, if the crime causes someone's life to be harmed. A traffic ticket doesn't even come close. It shocks me everyday that criminals get away with so much in this country and are barely slapped on the wrist. And I don't think pedophiles can be "rehabilitated" either. I say lock um up and cut it off.

     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from frankjcapp. Show frankjcapp's posts

    This shouldn't be allowed

    The citation says something like, "Pleading guilty to this violation will result in a conviction." Totally backs what you're saying....-->-->Oh ... for sure ... even a parking ticket is technically a "conviction". However, it isn't a criminal offense, like driving with your license suspended or DUI. All involve a car, just some violations�are not considered "criminal".-->-->I'm concerned about the lack of understanding about our justice system that exists today. The whole foundation of English Law (the basis of our law) is predicated on "redemption". You commit an offense, you do time or pay a fine ... and society finds redemption and allows you to go forth and "sin no more".-->-->This aspect of crime and punishment seems lost on those who feel once a criminal always a criminal. We, in fact, through the parole or probation system, registries, CORI laws, etc., have placed an almost immovable barrier for those who have served their time to recapture some semblance of their lives. The system will, in fact, create recidivism by forcing those who cannot care for themselves or their families back into crime in order to earn a living. Or, as is more the case with drug offenses, offer nothing but time behind bars, and then taking their addiction back to the streets.-->-->

     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from frankjcapp. Show frankjcapp's posts

    This shouldn't be allowed

    It shocks me everyday that criminals get away with so much in this country and are barely slapped on the wrist.


    The United States has the highest incarceration rate in the world at 737 persons imprisoned per 100,000. I think we're doing a yeoman's job of locking people up !!

    I suspect that were you having a loved one incarcerated for, say, smoking pot, or some other trivial charge, and then have their lives devastated by the criminal justice system, you would not be singing your current song.

     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from trublusu. Show trublusu's posts

    This shouldn't be allowed

    We have more people incarcerated because many other countries use "other" forms of punishment that don't require incarceration. We lock em up, give them 3 square meals a day, job training and education.�

     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from trublusu. Show trublusu's posts

    This shouldn't be allowed

    This was in today's paper about the kid ( now man ) in the Pamela Smart case - the one who killed the husband.�Since entering prison, Flynn has earned a GED, taken college computer courses, earned an electrician's helper license and gotten married. His court file contains more than a dozen letters of support from prison employees, friends and people who say they would hire him if he is released.Exuse me, but this guy's even had the chance to get married - when did he get a chance to date considering he's been in prison since he was 16?.I� bet the�taxpayers paid for his honeymoon too.

     
  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from salsaking. Show salsaking's posts

    This shouldn't be allowed

    If more people took the stance I have we'd be a lot better off. As I have stated, three times in my life I have gone to parties and found that marijuana was being used. Right out in the open! Even though two of the parties were being thrown by friends, it didn't matter. In all three cases I immediately left and called the police to report these crimes. Two calls resulted in arrests.This is the way every responsible citizen should be handling these situations. People need to get the message that we want law and order restored!�

     
Sections
Shortcuts

Share