Single-sex schools in Georgia

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from BostonDotCom. Show BostonDotCom's posts

    Single-sex schools in Georgia

    A school district in Georgia is set to become the first district in the nation to go entirely single-sex, with boys and girls in separate classrooms through high school. Do you think being in a single-sex classroom will improve the students' learning experience? How do students benefit from being in classrooms separated by gender?
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from frankjcapp. Show frankjcapp's posts

    Single-sex schools in Georgia

    Catholic Schools (Parochial) have been doing this for decades ...

    And there is a reason the Protestant boys want to date Catholic HS girls ...

    I think that this retards the social growth of teenages unnaturally, negating any benefit the might arise from teaching at different paces.

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from randy07. Show randy07's posts

    Single-sex schools in Georgia

    No - but it might promote REAL EDUCATION for a change. Learning has taken a back seat to social issues and political correctness. It's a wonder anyone has time to learn ANY math with all the crap the teachers are forced to deal with in the classroom. Heaven forbid little Jane & Johnny don't have "self esteem". �That seems to be the priority now. Self esteem over NOTHING. Even students failing all their subjects�have to� feel good about themselves.� BS - let them do something to earn it for a change.�Many parents� are so wrapped up in their own existence that they could care less what is going on.� Ship the kids out the door so you can get to Starbucks or the gym.� It's a "feel good" world and we will be overtaken but countries that truly value education.And on top of it all, "it takes a village" to try to educate the burnout kids delivered by the welfare moms. If I read one more story about a 19 year old gangbanger�with 3 illegimitate kids who is "turning his life around"� I think I'll scream.

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from lnmonster. Show lnmonster's posts

    Single-sex schools in Georgia

    Catholic Schools (Parochial) have been doing this for decades ...

    So have the Taliban in Afghanistan.
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from corpsie. Show corpsie's posts

    Single-sex schools in Georgia

    as a graduate of a single sex catholic high school, i can say there are plusses and minuses to single sex education. for the time students spend in class, i think it was excellent, simply for the fact that instead of being distracted by the hormonal pull of the girl sitting in the row next to you, you focused as much as a teenager can focus on what was being taught. however, the negative was the difficulty in learning the equally important ways of socializing with members of the opposite sex. the ideal situation I would argue would be single sex classrooms,� within the context of a co-educational population.

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from randy07. Show randy07's posts

    Single-sex schools in Georgia

    Funny - your argument shows the absolute need for single sex classrooms. It's the best solution to help women progress to their highest abilities - at least until society changes. I wouldn't want my kids to have to wait that long.

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from justintpryan. Show justintpryan's posts

    Single-sex schools in Georgia

    As a natural matter, I firmly believe that whatever a school system wants to do, they should be able to do. Local concerns ought be handled by local government with few exceptions. By this article, however, it does not appear that�certain local entities, parents etc�were properly consulted. However, I wouldn't be surprised if the local people here�hardly care about who represents them on school committees under normal circumstance�but once something�momentous like this happens, they scream�bloody murder, claiming they weren't consulted when they voted blindly by party etc, or they didn't vote at all.��The schools in this area of Georgia are clearly struggling mightily and it seems that a fundamental shift of approach is what's needed. Legally though, it seems that this would have to be an option, rather than mandatory. Advocates for single sex education seem to oppose this plan on that basis.�To compare single sex Catholic schools to the the Taliban is absurd�and offensive and�I hope that was a joke. As for the debate on single sex education, I think it's generally beneficial for most, but not all. For myself, once I got over the fact that I wasn't going to be going to school with girls, I flourished in the atmosphere and had, actually, more female friends than male who went to other schools. Hardly the mark of social growth retardation as someone else here commented. I also relished then and now in retrospect, the lack of politique in the classroom. What you said was going to be challenged and if people thought you were wrong, you were told as much.�A�free, rigorous exchange of ideas was present that is sometimes missed in some co-ed settings where ideas/ thoughts/views are given�differing level of credence based, sometimes, on the speaker and their gender and perhaps their looks or social prowess in the school. Further, while�being required to look neat and presentable,�how you dressed�was of little importance�and could concentrate more on classes, rather than having the latest fashions. This proposal seems like a good one, taken a little too far. But this is precisely the type of brave, fundamental change that needs to happen in education, at many levels, that many educational elites and teacher unions,�convinced of their rightness, oppose despite decades of systematic failure.�

     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from aynnie. Show aynnie's posts

    Single-sex schools in Georgia

    Inmonster:No, the Taliban has NOT been doing this - they FORBID girls from going to school At ALL.� As someone said, that is a pretty insulting thing to say, comparing Catholic schools to the Taliban.� But I am sure you were trying to be insulting.My kids go to same-sex schools and we are big believers - that does not mean that I think it's the only way or that co-ed schools are bad, I don't think that at all.� I just think my children have benefitted from same-sex schools.� Each family is different.

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from car402. Show car402's posts

    Single-sex schools in Georgia

    First of all, the responsibility lies with the parents to teach children responsibility. If a child is runnig around getting into trouble, skipping school , getting pregnant, dropping out, acting like a clown in class...where are they learning this?...why are they getting away with this?...Schools are not meant to be babysitting services, or recreation facilities.��They are there to learn, it is there only job. It sounds like the school district is desperate.� It isn't so cut and dry that it will work, but�to the parents of these�kids....so what if they're poor..... get�their heads out of the clouds and stop blaming everyone else for the child's behavior.� If they are lazy children, they will be lazy adults... then where will we be.� It might improve the learning experience, but even in same sex schools, you will have troublemakers. this is just a bandaid.

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from lnmonster. Show lnmonster's posts

    Single-sex schools in Georgia

    But I am sure you were trying to be insulting.

    No, I was trying to be funny.� But the fact that thou doth protest too much suggests that there might be just a bit too much truth to the comparison of orthodox followers of the Muslim and Christian faiths for your comfort.� I apologize.

     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from eflynn28. Show eflynn28's posts

    Single-sex schools in Georgia

    I am also a graduate of a catholic, single sex education.� When I have children, they will also be going to a catholic single sex school as I believe firmly that it is best for them.� The students pay closer�attention in class because they are not flirting or checking out the opposite sex while in class.� With the uniforms, no one was out to look better than someone else.Contrary to your belief I did not have any difficulty in learning how to socialize with members of the opposite sex.� I socialized outside of school and had boyfriends that I met either in the town I lived in or who I met through friends.� I socialized withe the people I lived near and also parties/get-togethers always provided plenty of socializing.There is a reason why single sex, private school children go on to attend excellent college and do well in life.

     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from eflynn28. Show eflynn28's posts

    Single-sex schools in Georgia

    I'm not saying that people who go to "normal" co-ed high schools don't go on to attend nice colleges and do well in life.� But, if you look at the statistics, a higher percentage of students in a private (same sex or co-ed) school� will have gone on�to college and of those colleges, they are usually a higher tiered college.

     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from eflynn28. Show eflynn28's posts

    Single-sex schools in Georgia

    No, I don't think it has to do with money at all.� I think it has to do with the caliber of schooling and parenting.� BTW - not everyone who goes to private schools is well-off.� Some parents give up alot to send their children to private school because they know what it's worth.�

     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from aynnie. Show aynnie's posts

    Single-sex schools in Georgia

    No, I'm comfortable with the fact that there aren't many similarities between Catholic schools in the US and those run by the Taliban.� Okay, so you were being funny.

     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from jstarr. Show jstarr's posts

    Single-sex schools in Georgia

    I went to an all-girls Catholic high school and see nothing but benefits, especially in high school. Removing the biggest distraction for adolescents�(the opposite sex) completely changes the school experience to what it should be, which is an environment that encourages achievement, leadership, and service in academics, sports, the arts, extra-curriculars, etc. Going to a single-sex school provides a needed respite from the drama of the dating and mating game. I can't imagine the stress of trying to do well in school, sports, and activities and worrying about how I look or what I say or whether or not the hot guy in the next row likes me.Single-sex education is not sexist unless you use gender to affect the quality of education. In this day and age, it's not as if single-sex public schools are going to have different standards, curricula, and graduation requirements for each gender. I highly doubt that the girls' schools will lack AP math and science in favor of home economics, or that the boys' schools will drop AP English to accommodate more shop.As for learning how to socialize and compete with the opposite gender, I don't see this as a concern. We're not talking about segregating kids from the opposite sex 24/7 for years, we're talking about a few hours a day for a few years. I have never felt unprepared to learn and work with men in college or in the workforce.If�we can afford to privately educate�our children as they get older, single-sex high school will be an option that my husband and I seriously consider.

     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from lacbc5. Show lacbc5's posts

    Single-sex schools in Georgia

    i agree with many of jstarr's points.i also went to an all-girls catholic high school, and i believe that the experience had both pros and cons - an argument you can make with ANY school.� To piggyback on jstarr's comment, one of the biggest pros was the fact that you didnt have to worry about the hot guy sitting behind you in class and if you would feel embarassed asking a question.� About a year or so after graduation I had a conversation with a few of my classmates from high school, and we all had a similar feeling that we had more confidence speaking up in college classes because we were accustomed to speaking up in high school without any hesitation.� This isn't to say that females from co-ed schools DON'T feel comfortable participating in classes - it was meerly an observation that we all felt.� In addition to the relief of not having to deal with social pressures that occur with having the opposite sex present during school, the uniforms were also fantastic.� They were great equalizers - and made it easy to get ready in the morning :-)In my experience, the biggest detrement to single sex high schools was not having that feeling of a "normal" high school enviroment.� Many single-sex high schools do not start in kindergarden or elementary school - so when you start high school you start with a whole new group of people.� You don't have the experience of growing up with the same group of students and friends since kindergarden.� In addition, many students have to travel to their respective single-sex high schools.� In my experience, it made it difficult to plan weekend activities with your classmates since it always required elaborate planning -- as opposed to just picking up the phone at 8pm and calling your friend down the street to figure out who is throwing the party around the corner.� I typically socialized with friends located closer to my home, and my high school classmates remained in many ways, just "classmates" due to the fact that we all lived so far apart from each other.Bottom line - I think you can make Pro and Con arguments for both co-ed and single-sex schools.� One isn't necessarily "better" than the other as far as enriching experiences - they're just different - and in the end it depends on what kind of experience you want (or you want your kids) to have.

     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from eflynn28. Show eflynn28's posts

    Single-sex schools in Georgia

    I have to disagree.� Again, I went�to an all-girls high school and college (although the college�has since changed to co-ed) and I heard the exact opposite as what you heard.� We were pushed to succeed at everything, be it arts, sports, english, math, or science.� We were taught that as women we�can do anything that the boys can do (possibly better than the boys!).� To show this, there were no home economics in my school (ever).� There were no female "fluff" classes.� However, there were plenty of Advanced Placement classes for math, science, and literature.� We were told we�were equals in the workplace and equals at home, never one or the other (or either for that matter).�

     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from nautic3727. Show nautic3727's posts

    Single-sex schools in Georgia

    Imagine getting laid only once (single sex)�in High School.

     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from eflynn28. Show eflynn28's posts

    Single-sex schools in Georgia

    I'm not sure about the girls who wanted to take home ec....I honestly don't remember any girl wanting to take it (or at least me hearing them say so).� From what I heard about home ec...you learn cooking , cleaning and such.� I don't know about most people, but I learned that from my parents.

     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from justthinking---. Show justthinking---'s posts

    Single-sex schools in Georgia

    Way to go, jstarr.-->�-->Back five years ago (Sept., 2002, in fact) there was anarticle in the Globe about single gendereducation, citing research and anecdotal evidence supporting it.� As much as people think separating boys andgirls is wrong, current research shows it to be better than our current system.� Especially in a society that bombards ourchildren with sexual references from an early age, research shows thateducating them away from that pressure enhances a child�s development, instillingconfidence and a focus on learning objectives.�How can it be wrong for a child to learn how to succeed first, then turntheir attention to the opposite gender?�Rather than clipping their wings or cloistering them away from eachother, isn�t it better to nurture first, ensuring they have the self-knowledge,confidence and skills (academic and personal) necessary to truly fly?-->�-->My 2 youngest daughters attend a single-sex school and(gasp!) wear a uniform also.� As strongsupporters of public schools, it was a difficult decision for my husband and me.� Like many here have experienced, I worked ina largely male firm and was concerned that my daughters would not be able tofunction in a mixed-gender environment if they had no real world experiencewith boys in school. �Several years ofseeing this all-girl school �in action� has put my anxieties to rest.� My oldest girl, several years out of school herself(she attended co-ed schools throughout her education), asked my HS sophomorehow she felt around boys, assuming it must be awkward for her &uncomfortable since she had little day-to-day exposure to boys her ownage.� �On the contrary,� my sophomoregirl said, �I�m a lot more confident than I think I would have been if I werein a co-ed school.� And I don�t care if I�mtalking to a boy or a girl, an adult or another kid.� I can talk with anyone.�� This from a girl who was so timid in herprevious (public, mixed gender) school that she would never ask if she could goto the bathroom; she�d just wait until she got home every day.� I�ve watched both my youngest girls (one inmiddle school, the other in high school) blossom into confident leaders,willing to tackle any task and take on any challenge, sensitive to the needs ofothers but willing to state their needs as well.� Their academics are very strong (as was,honestly, our local public school�s) and, as it�s a small school, there�s awonderful supportive environment.� Eachgirl is encouraged to achieve her personal best, regardless of what thatis.� The bar is set high and my daughtersare encouraged to reach it � and then set one higher � and they�re given theattention necessary to accomplish that task.�-->�-->BTW � we are not a wealthy family.� The newest of our 2 cars is 7 years old.� My husband and I work hard to create apositive environment at home, but it�s certainly not an affluent one.� We sacrifice a great deal to afford thetuition but feel it�s worth it.� By far,this has been one of our better parenting decisions.� -->�-->Oh, and my very shy girl who never spoke up in her larger,mixed gender school ran for class office last year (and lost with grace) and isvery proud that some of the older girls in her school taught her and a bunch ofthe other younger kids to burp the alphabet � something none of them ever wouldhave had the nerve to do in front of boys!�And my husband and I feel that kind of self-confidence and sense ofhumor is worth every penny.

     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from mjcronin1. Show mjcronin1's posts

    Single-sex schools in Georgia

    As an education professional I have to ask what the research base says about single-sex education.� I have not taken the time to review it, but would go out on a limb to suggest that there is no significant impact on academic achievement compared to coed groupings.� I also wonder if elementary vs middle vs HS makes any difference.� Learning differences are so individual that separating students out by gender is as gross a misguided solution to increasing achievement�as separating by race.� The difference in achievement cited by a previous post regarding single-sex parochial high school has probably more to do with socioeconomics and family factors than gender.As a graduate of a single-sex high school, I wouldn't choose to do it again.� I went simply because my parents did not like the quality of eduction the public high school offered and the parochial high school had more college prep and advanced placement offerings.� In hindsight I�think it lacked important social learning experiences at a time when social learning is as important as academic.� I am a better profesional because of those academic opportunities, not because it was an all male class.� Seperating out diversity of all types does not allow children to prepare for the real world.�

     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from petergibbons. Show petergibbons's posts

    Single-sex schools in Georgia

    I have not read the report but has anyone else noticed that single-sex private schools do not have to conform to the same rules and standards as public schools, whether or not they are single-sex schools.� So in a private system, if you can't hack it, you probably fail out, parents pull you because they are not going to pay money for a failing education or you are forced to do better.� In a public school, the class can only go as fast as the slowest learner.� This is one of the main differences in the public/private schooling systems.� They do not have to play by the same set of rules.-->-->Now unless public schools that are single-sex are studied, we cannot really say for sure�what the outcome will show and how it compares to co-ed public schooling.�-->-->�

     

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