"We're going to send them as soon as we get a car open"

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from miscricket. Show miscricket's posts

    "We're going to send them as soon as we get a car open"

    This was the response from the Cleveland police department dispatcher when kidnap victim Amanda Berry called 911 for help.  To me..this epitomizes the overall response to these kidnap cases and the case of serial killer Anthony  Sowell.

    You would think that after their complete indifference to the events in the Anthony Sowell case ( where they were slow to respond to reports of a naked woman trying to escape his home) that another report of a naked woman would give them pause..and would cause them to do more than just knock on a door. You would think that reports of a woman screaming would at least cause them to investigate beyond..again..a knocking on the door.

    While I understand that the only people who are truly to blame for the kidnapping and years of rape and torture of Amanda Berry and the two other young women are the perpetrators themselves, one has to wonder how many extra days, months or years of torture these women endured..either because of police apathy or police incompetence.

    I am never one to criticize law enforcement..but this case cries out for an investigation into the policies of this police department. The lack of urgency on behalf of the 911 operator is disturbing in and of itself. Add the "missed clues" and "missed opportunities" by the Cleveland PD over the years and it becomes indicative of a possible bigger issue. One thing seems to be clear..between the Anthony Sowell case and now this...it seems that maybe it's time for a leadership change.

     
  2. This post has been removed.

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from FaolanofEssex. Show FaolanofEssex's posts

    Re:

    Don't blame the cops- you can't tell me the neighbors knew nothing.

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from yogafriend. Show yogafriend's posts

    Re:

    In response to ms_obstinate's comment:

    There's only so much the cops can do. We don't know the "why" they didn't investigate further. Perhaps nothing out of the ordinary appeared to them, after all Ariel Casto had his neighbors fooled. I think the bigger problem is we just don't know what is happening in our own back yards. 


    I've had firsthand experience in the recent past as to the "what / when / how" of cop intervention.   It's true that they will look you square in the eye and say that there's "nothing they can do" under (certain) circumstances, and if your situation falls into that category, all they can or will tell you is that they'll keep an eye out.   My neighbor gave me cause to go to the police -- they have a thick file on her as it stands, and know all about her mental illness (this isn't hyperbole or a figure of speech; she is truly mentally ill) and have complaints of other neighbors, and still, as her behavior persists, there is nothing that can be done.   She's just one example.   Can you imagine all of the other types of cases in the same category?   

    There are more questions than answers in this kidnapping case, and of course it leaves one baffled as to "how could this persist?"  --  "how could no one have known?"  -- and yet, they reported in the news that there are thousands of missing persons in our midst on any given day, some sadly are no longer alive, but many, many are ... and in some cases, mere miles from the spot where they were initially abducted.   Unreal.  

    10-years is a long time to miss out on life, while being treated in the most odious and unseemly way imaginable, but thankfully, these 3 women are alive and will recover, with time and support.   Hard to fathom, you know?

    ETA: The 911 dispatcher has to go.  :0

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from skeeter20. Show skeeter20's posts

    Re:

    As this cases shows, and similarly as finding the 2nd suspect in the boat in Watertwon shows, there is a limit to what the police can do, and a limit to their success.  They are not all powerful.  The police do what they can, but they are largely an "after the crime has occured" force.  Towns and cities have only so much money to hire only so many police.

    So, let's not blame them for what they cannot control.  Instead, let's be vigilant (and armed) population, as we are likely to be called to action long before police arrive, as this situation shows.

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from miscricket. Show miscricket's posts

    Re:

    Thanks for the comments. I actually agree with part of what you all say. Msobstinate..I don't want to be ( or come across as) one of those people who are bashing police. I was someone hesitant to put those comments up.

    I read an article late last night on Slate.com which made an excellent point. Don't blame the police department per se. With communities strapped..programs like community policing are usually the first to go. While less efficient..a community policing program would have resulted in a bigger awareness of the neighborhood happenings and maybe earlier action.

    I still don't like the response from the 911 operator. I agree with YogaFriend...there are more questions than answers surrounding all of this. I think there should be a complete and thorough investigation. Not with the intent of casting blame...but with the intent of reviewing processes and finding out what if anything needs to be improved.

    Skeeter, who would you have liked to be armed in this situation? The victims? They were young women..in one case a minor..in another case..she knew the kidnapper.

     
  7. This post has been removed.

     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from skeeter20. Show skeeter20's posts

    Re:

    In response to miscricket's comment:

    Thanks for the comments. I actually agree with part of what you all say. Msobstinate..I don't want to be ( or come across as) one of those people who are bashing police. I was someone hesitant to put those comments up.

    I read an article late last night on Slate.com which made an excellent point. Don't blame the police department per se. With communities strapped..programs like community policing are usually the first to go. While less efficient..a community policing program would have resulted in a bigger awareness of the neighborhood happenings and maybe earlier action.

    I still don't like the response from the 911 operator. I agree with YogaFriend...there are more questions than answers surrounding all of this. I think there should be a complete and thorough investigation. Not with the intent of casting blame...but with the intent of reviewing processes and finding out what if anything needs to be improved.

    Skeeter, who would you have liked to be armed in this situation? The victims? They were young women..in one case a minor..in another case..she knew the kidnapper.



    Guns may or may not have helped in this situation.  As it rolled out, not needed.  But, not every situation is like this.  Home invasions, car thefts, and the like.

    Face it:  the police can really only respond after the fact in the vast majority of crimes.

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from miscricket. Show miscricket's posts

    Re:

    In response to skeeter20's comment:

    In response to miscricket's comment:

     

    Thanks for the comments. I actually agree with part of what you all say. Msobstinate..I don't want to be ( or come across as) one of those people who are bashing police. I was someone hesitant to put those comments up.

    I read an article late last night on Slate.com which made an excellent point. Don't blame the police department per se. With communities strapped..programs like community policing are usually the first to go. While less efficient..a community policing program would have resulted in a bigger awareness of the neighborhood happenings and maybe earlier action.

    I still don't like the response from the 911 operator. I agree with YogaFriend...there are more questions than answers surrounding all of this. I think there should be a complete and thorough investigation. Not with the intent of casting blame...but with the intent of reviewing processes and finding out what if anything needs to be improved.

    Skeeter, who would you have liked to be armed in this situation? The victims? They were young women..in one case a minor..in another case..she knew the kidnapper.

     



    Guns may or may not have helped in this situation.  As it rolled out, not needed.  But, not every situation is like this.  Home invasions, car thefts, and the like.

     

    Face it:  the police can really only respond after the fact in the vast majority of crimes.




    I agree for the most part...but I view it differently that adding more guns to the mix keeps us safer. Sorry...I know you want to believe that's true..and on the face of it..it does make some sense...but the numbers and statistics just don't bear out that fact. Adding more guns increases risk..it doesn't decrease it.

    Really in this case the solution would be to put back the community policing programs..you know..the "old fashioned" way of law enforcement. Sometimes "new" doesn't always tranlate to better.

     
Sections
Shortcuts

Share