Bigots are the people who chose to ignore the problem; please lead Mr. President!

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    Bigots are the people who chose to ignore the problem; please lead Mr. President!

    Mr. President, it’s your move.

    The heat of public reaction from the George Zimmerman-Trayvon Martin murder trial is starting to cool.

    Now the first black president has a chance to use his unique standing in black America to move beyond the racial static. He can help future Trayvon Martins – poor, young, black American men – avoid falling into more trouble and off America’s ladder of upward mobility.

    Bill O’Reilly passionately made the point on his show this week when he said it is time for “straight talk and I hope the president is listening because we need him to lead on this issue.”

    And the issue O’Reilly loudly nailed to the presidential wall for priority action is the high number of young black men who are victims of violent crime, who are convicted of violent crime and end up in jail for breaking the law.

    “The statistics are overwhelming,” O’Reilly said. “Here is the headline: Young black men commit homicides at a rate ten times greater than whites and Hispanics combined.” And the root cause of the problem, O’Reilly said, is “the disintegration of the African-American family.”

    It is hard for O’Reilly to make this point and get young black men or civil rights leaders to listen.

    When a white conservative raises the issue of black men and crime, especially after the overwhelming white Republican support for a verdict that gave no justice to the black family of a murdered teen, a lot of people are going to see it as trying to shift the focus to problems in the black community. They also dismiss it as an attempt to distract black people from their outrage over recent events.

    That is why it is time for people who care about black America to act.

    That is why O’Reilly is exactly right to point to the black man with the highest level of credibility in black America since Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. – President Obama – and challenge that man to deliver the message to black America that it is time to focus on fixing the black family and helping young black men get on the road to success.

    Bill Cosby, the famous comic entertainer, has a lot of credibility in black America. He has tried to deliver the message that there is map for young black men to find success. I wrote a book about Cosby’s epic effort, it's called ‘ENOUGH: The Phony Leaders, Dead-End Movements, and Culture of Failure That Are Undermining Black America – and What We Can Do About It.”

    But no one has the chance to deliver that message as powerfully as President Obama can right now. He is in a unique historical position, with a singular pulpit from which to speak and act to do something incredible to help young black men benefit from the opportunities in our great country.

    Here is what he should say clearly. The road to success is plain as day.

    1. Stay in school and graduate from the highest level of school– but absolutely, no excuses, graduate from high school.

    2. Take a job and hold it, no matter what job, no matter if your friends put you down for ‘flipping burgers.’ Use the job to get experience, make contacts with business people, and build a resume.

    3. Marry after you have finished your education and while you have a job.

    And the final step is important for you and for the future of your family and your community:

    4. Don’t have children until you are 21-years-old and married.

    Imagine if President Obama repeated that message over and over, ignoring the phonies who want to focus only on “systemic” racism as the reason for high rates of poverty, involvement with crime, and incarceration among black men.

    Imagine if the president delivered that message despite attempted to intimidate him by civil rights leaders like Rev. Jesse Jackson who said the president deserved to be castrated for calling for black men to be good fathers.

    Imagine if he decided to deliver that message and by-passed the so-called ‘racial experts’ and academics who prefer to look at America’s troubled racial history – slavery and legal segregation.

    The answer is the president could make a difference in millions of lives and build a legacy on par with Dr. King.

    And that message is a proven solution. Here is the track record for that solution as I wrote about it in my book, "ENOUGH: The Phony Leaders, Dead-End Movements, and Culture of Failure That Are Undermining Black America--and What We Can Do About It." “The poverty rate for any black man or woman who follows that formula is a mere 6.4 percent…in other words by meeting those basic requirements black American can cut their chances of being poor by two-thirds…even white American families have a higher poverty rate than black people who finished high school, got married, had children after 21 and worked for at least one week a year.”

    The key for black women is also in the formula – do not have a baby outside of a strong marriage. Over a third [35 percent] of the black women who have children out of wedlock – now tragically more than 70 percent – live in poverty.

    By comparison, only 17 percent of black women who are married live in poverty. And black children with both parents at home have a better chance for success, fewer dealings with the police, higher graduation rates and are more likely to marry before they have children.

    Marriage and the presence of adults as role models and loving disciplinarians is absolutely critical helping young black men build the self-esteem that puts them in position to make good decisions that lead to the road to success.

    As usual, my pal O’Reilly puts it more bluntly: “Right now 73 percent of all black babies are born out of wedlock. That drives poverty and the lack of involved fathers leads to young boys growing up resentful and unsupervised. When was the last time you saw a public service ad telling young black girls to avoid [out-of-wedlock pregnancies]? Has President Obama done such an ad?”

    There’s nothing that could be done for young black men that’s more powerful, that would help them more, than strong fathers who are present in strong families.

    Mr. President, it is your move.

    Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/opinion/2013/07/24/president-obama-oreilly-and-trayvon-cry-for-help/#ixzz2a3lkyB2p

     
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    Re: Bigots are the people who chose to ignore the problem; please lead Mr. President!


     
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    Re: Bigots are the people who chose to ignore the problem; please lead Mr. President!

    In response to chiefhowie's comment:

    In response to Sistersledge's comment:

    [QUOTE]

     


     



     

    [/QUOTE]


    I know that the person getting his wallet lifted can't be a conservative ...... everybody knows that they keep their dough in coffee cans buried in their backyards

     
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    Re: Bigots are the people who chose to ignore the problem; please lead Mr. President!


    Apparently sister would rather our nation ignore the problem and just continue to do the same blame game while propping up of irresponsible behavior through govt programs that keep people on the plantation.

    Make a difference talk about the real issues are stfu!

     
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    Re: Bigots are the people who chose to ignore the problem; please lead Mr. President!

    I am continuing to be surprised by people calling for the president to rally black men, lecture them on violence, on responsibility, etc when he has and continues to do those very things.  He did so at his commencement address to Morehouse College, a historically black all male university, and did so even more pointedly in his Fathers Day address, almost a full month before the Zimmerman verdict and his subsequent comments on that issue:

    _______________________________________________________________________

    Father's Day speech at Apostolic Church of God a largely Black congregation on Chicago's South Side:

     

    Of all the rocks upon which we build our lives, we are reminded today that family is the most important. And we are called to recognize and honor how critical every father is to that foundation. They are teachers and coaches. They are mentors and role models. They are examples of success and the men who constantly push us toward it.

    But if we are honest with ourselves, we'll admit that what too many fathers also are is missing - missing from too many lives and too many homes. They have abandoned their responsibilities, acting like boys instead of men. And the foundations of our families are weaker because of it.

    You and I know how true this is in the African-American community. We know that more than half of all black children live in single-parent households, a number that has doubled - doubled - since we were children. We know the statistics - that children who grow up without a father are five times more likely to live in poverty and commit crime; nine times more likely to drop out of schools and twenty times more likely to end up in prison. They are more likely to have behavioral problems, or run away from home, or become teenage parents themselves. And the foundations of our community are weaker because of it.

    How many times in the last year has this city lost a child at the hands of another child? How many times have our hearts stopped in the middle of the night with the sound of a gunshot or a siren? How many teenagers have we seen hanging around on street corners when they should be sitting in a classroom? How many are sitting in prison when they should be working, or at least looking for a job? How many in this generation are we willing to lose to poverty or violence or addiction? How many?

    Yes, we need more cops on the street. Yes, we need fewer guns in the hands of people who shouldn't have them. Yes, we need more money for our schools, and more outstanding teachers in the classroom, and more afterschool programs for our children. Yes, we need more jobs and more job training and more opportunity in our communities.

    But we also need families to raise our children. We need fathers to realize that responsibility does not end at conception. We need them to realize that what makes you a man is not the ability to have a child - it's the courage to raise one.

    We need to help all the mothers out there who are raising these kids by themselves; the mothers who drop them off at school, go to work, pick up them up in the afternoon, work another shift, get dinner, make lunches, pay the bills, fix the house, and all the other things it takes both parents to do. So many of these women are doing a heroic job, but they need support. They need another parent. Their children need another parent. That's what keeps their foundation strong. It's what keeps the foundation of our country strong.

    I know what it means to have an absent father, although my circumstances weren't as tough as they are for many young people today. Even though my father left us when I was two years old, and I only knew him from the letters he wrote and the stories that my family told, I was luckier than most. I grew up in Hawaii, and had two wonderful grandparents from Kansas who poured everything they had into helping my mother raise my sister and me - who worked with her to teach us about love and respect and the obligations we have to one another. I screwed up more often than I should've, but I got plenty of second chances. And even though we didn't have a lot of money, scholarships gave me the opportunity to go to some of the best schools in the country. A lot of kids don't get these chances today. There is no margin for error in their lives. So my own story is different in that way.

    Still, I know the toll that being a single parent took on my mother - how she struggled at times to the pay bills; to give us the things that other kids had; to play all the roles that both parents are supposed to play. And I know the toll it took on me. So I resolved many years ago that it was my obligation to break the cycle - that if I could be anything in life, I would be a good father to my girls; that if I could give them anything, I would give them that rock - that foundation - on which to build their lives. And that would be the greatest gift I could offer.

    I say this knowing that I have been an imperfect father - knowing that I have made mistakes and will continue to make more; wishing that I could be home for my girls and my wife more than I am right now. I say this knowing all of these things because even as we are imperfect, even as we face difficult circumstances, there are still certain lessons we must strive to live and learn as fathers - whether we are black or white; rich or poor; from the South Side or the wealthiest suburb.

    The first is setting an example of excellence for our children - because if we want to set high expectations for them, we've got to set high expectations for ourselves. It's great if you have a job; it's even better if you have a college degree. It's a wonderful thing if you are married and living in a home with your children, but don't just sit in the house and watch "SportsCenter" all weekend long. That's why so many children are growing up in front of the television. As fathers and parents, we've got to spend more time with them, and help them with their homework, and replace the video game or the remote control with a book once in awhile. That's how we build that foundation.

    We know that education is everything to our children's future. We know that they will no longer just compete for good jobs with children from Indiana, but children from India and China and all over the world. We know the work and the studying and the level of education that requires.

    You know, sometimes I'll go to an eighth-grade graduation and there's all that pomp and circumstance and gowns and flowers. And I think to myself, it's just eighth grade. To really compete, they need to graduate high school, and then they need to graduate college, and they probably need a graduate degree too. An eighth-grade education doesn't cut it today. Let's give them a handshake and tell them to get their butts back in the library!

    It's up to us - as fathers and parents - to instill this ethic of excellence in our children. It's up to us to say to our daughters, don't ever let images on TV tell you what you are worth, because I expect you to dream without limit and reach for those goals. It's up to us to tell our sons, those songs on the radio may glorify violence, but in my house we live glory to achievement, self respect, and hard work. It's up to us to set these high expectations. And that means meeting those expectations ourselves. That means setting examples of excellence in our own lives.

    The second thing we need to do as fathers is pass along the value of empathy to our children. Not sympathy, but empathy - the ability to stand in somebody else's shoes; to look at the world through their eyes. Sometimes it's so easy to get caught up in "us," that we forget about our obligations to one another. There's a culture in our society that says remembering these obligations is somehow soft - that we can't show weakness, and so therefore we can't show kindness.

    But our young boys and girls see that. They see when you are ignoring or mistreating your wife. They see when you are inconsiderate at home; or when you are distant; or when you are thinking only of yourself. And so it's no surprise when we see that behavior in our schools or on our streets. That's why we pass on the values of empathy and kindness to our children by living them. We need to show our kids that you're not strong by putting other people down - you're strong by lifting them up. That's our responsibility as fathers.

    And by the way - it's a responsibility that also extends to Washington. Because if fathers are doing their part; if they're taking our responsibilities seriously to be there for their children, and set high expectations for them, and instill in them a sense of excellence and empathy, then our government should meet them halfway.

    We should be making it easier for fathers who make responsible choices and harder for those who avoid them. We should get rid of the financial penalties we impose on married couples right now, and start making sure that every dime of child support goes directly to helping children instead of some bureaucrat. We should reward fathers who pay that child support with job training and job opportunities and a larger Earned Income Tax Credit that can help them pay the bills. We should expand programs where registered nurses visit expectant and new mothers and help them learn how to care for themselves before the baby is born and what to do after - programs that have helped increase father involvement, women's employment, and children's readiness for school. We should help these new families care for their children by expanding maternity and paternity leave, and we should guarantee every worker more paid sick leave so they can stay home to take care of their child without losing their income.

    We should take all of these steps to build a strong foundation for our children. But we should also know that even if we do; even if we meet our obligations as fathers and parents; even if Washington does its part too, we will still face difficult challenges in our lives. There will still be days of struggle and heartache. The rains will still come and the winds will still blow.

    And that is why the final lesson we must learn as fathers is also the greatest gift we can pass on to our children - and that is the gift of hope.

    I'm not talking about an idle hope that's little more than blind optimism or willful ignorance of the problems we face. I'm talking about hope as that spirit inside us that insists, despite all evidence to the contrary, that something better is waiting for us if we're willing to work for it and fight for it. If we are willing to believe.

    I was answering questions at a town hall meeting in Wisconsin the other day and a young man raised his hand, and I figured he'd ask about college tuition or energy or maybe the war in Iraq. But instead he looked at me very seriously and he asked, "What does life mean to you?"

    Now, I have to admit that I wasn't quite prepared for that one. I think I stammered for a little bit, but then I stopped and gave it some thought, and I said this:

    When I was a young man, I thought life was all about me - how do I make my way in the world, and how do I become successful and how do I get the things that I want.

    But now, my life revolves around my two little girls. And what I think about is what kind of world I'm leaving them. Are they living in a county where there's a huge gap between a few who are wealthy and a whole bunch of people who are struggling every day? Are they living in a county that is still divided by race? A country where, because they're girls, they don't have as much opportunity as boys do? Are they living in a country where we are hated around the world because we don't cooperate effectively with other nations? Are they living a world that is in grave danger because of what we've done to its climate?

    And what I've realized is that life doesn't count for much unless you're willing to do your small part to leave our children - all of our children - a better world. Even if it's difficult. Even if the work seems great. Even if we don't get very far in our lifetime.

     

    That is our ultimate responsibility as fathers and parents. We try. We hope. We do what we can to build our house upon the sturdiest rock. And when the winds come, and the rains fall, and they beat upon that house, we keep faith that our Father will be there to guide us, and watch over us, and protect us, and lead His children through the darkest of storms into light of a better day. That is my prayer for all of us on this Father's Day, and that is my hope for this country in the years ahead. May God Bless you and your children. Thank you.

     
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  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from tvoter. Show tvoter's posts

    Re: Bigots are the people who chose to ignore the problem; please lead Mr. President!

    In response to DamainAllen's comment:

     

    I am continuing to be surprised by people calling for the president to rally black men, lecture them on violence, on responsibility, etc when he has and continues to do those very things.  He did so at his commencement address to Morehouse College, a historically black all male university, and did so even more pointedly in his Fathers Day address, almost a full month before the Zimmerman verdict and his subsequent comments on that issue:

    _______________________________________________________________________

    Father's Day speech at Apostolic Church of God a largely Black congregation on Chicago's South Side:

     

    Of all the rocks upon which we build our lives, we are reminded today that family is the most important. And we are called to recognize and honor how critical every father is to that foundation. They are teachers and coaches. They are mentors and role models. They are examples of success and the men who constantly push us toward it.

    But if we are honest with ourselves, we'll admit that what too many fathers also are is missing - missing from too many lives and too many homes. They have abandoned their responsibilities, acting like boys instead of men. And the foundations of our families are weaker because of it.

    You and I know how true this is in the African-American community. We know that more than half of all black children live in single-parent households, a number that has doubled - doubled - since we were children. We know the statistics - that children who grow up without a father are five times more likely to live in poverty and commit crime; nine times more likely to drop out of schools and twenty times more likely to end up in prison. They are more likely to have behavioral problems, or run away from home, or become teenage parents themselves. And the foundations of our community are weaker because of it.

    How many times in the last year has this city lost a child at the hands of another child? How many times have our hearts stopped in the middle of the night with the sound of a gunshot or a siren? How many teenagers have we seen hanging around on street corners when they should be sitting in a classroom? How many are sitting in prison when they should be working, or at least looking for a job? How many in this generation are we willing to lose to poverty or violence or addiction? How many?

    Yes, we need more cops on the street. Yes, we need fewer guns in the hands of people who shouldn't have them. Yes, we need more money for our schools, and more outstanding teachers in the classroom, and more afterschool programs for our children. Yes, we need more jobs and more job training and more opportunity in our communities.

    But we also need families to raise our children. We need fathers to realize that responsibility does not end at conception. We need them to realize that what makes you a man is not the ability to have a child - it's the courage to raise one.

    We need to help all the mothers out there who are raising these kids by themselves; the mothers who drop them off at school, go to work, pick up them up in the afternoon, work another shift, get dinner, make lunches, pay the bills, fix the house, and all the other things it takes both parents to do. So many of these women are doing a heroic job, but they need support. They need another parent. Their children need another parent. That's what keeps their foundation strong. It's what keeps the foundation of our country strong.

    I know what it means to have an absent father, although my circumstances weren't as tough as they are for many young people today. Even though my father left us when I was two years old, and I only knew him from the letters he wrote and the stories that my family told, I was luckier than most. I grew up in Hawaii, and had two wonderful grandparents from Kansas who poured everything they had into helping my mother raise my sister and me - who worked with her to teach us about love and respect and the obligations we have to one another. I screwed up more often than I should've, but I got plenty of second chances. And even though we didn't have a lot of money, scholarships gave me the opportunity to go to some of the best schools in the country. A lot of kids don't get these chances today. There is no margin for error in their lives. So my own story is different in that way.

    Still, I know the toll that being a single parent took on my mother - how she struggled at times to the pay bills; to give us the things that other kids had; to play all the roles that both parents are supposed to play. And I know the toll it took on me. So I resolved many years ago that it was my obligation to break the cycle - that if I could be anything in life, I would be a good father to my girls; that if I could give them anything, I would give them that rock - that foundation - on which to build their lives. And that would be the greatest gift I could offer.

    I say this knowing that I have been an imperfect father - knowing that I have made mistakes and will continue to make more; wishing that I could be home for my girls and my wife more than I am right now. I say this knowing all of these things because even as we are imperfect, even as we face difficult circumstances, there are still certain lessons we must strive to live and learn as fathers - whether we are black or white; rich or poor; from the South Side or the wealthiest suburb.

    The first is setting an example of excellence for our children - because if we want to set high expectations for them, we've got to set high expectations for ourselves. It's great if you have a job; it's even better if you have a college degree. It's a wonderful thing if you are married and living in a home with your children, but don't just sit in the house and watch "SportsCenter" all weekend long. That's why so many children are growing up in front of the television. As fathers and parents, we've got to spend more time with them, and help them with their homework, and replace the video game or the remote control with a book once in awhile. That's how we build that foundation.

    We know that education is everything to our children's future. We know that they will no longer just compete for good jobs with children from Indiana, but children from India and China and all over the world. We know the work and the studying and the level of education that requires.

    You know, sometimes I'll go to an eighth-grade graduation and there's all that pomp and circumstance and gowns and flowers. And I think to myself, it's just eighth grade. To really compete, they need to graduate high school, and then they need to graduate college, and they probably need a graduate degree too. An eighth-grade education doesn't cut it today. Let's give them a handshake and tell them to get their butts back in the library!

    It's up to us - as fathers and parents - to instill this ethic of excellence in our children. It's up to us to say to our daughters, don't ever let images on TV tell you what you are worth, because I expect you to dream without limit and reach for those goals. It's up to us to tell our sons, those songs on the radio may glorify violence, but in my house we live glory to achievement, self respect, and hard work. It's up to us to set these high expectations. And that means meeting those expectations ourselves. That means setting examples of excellence in our own lives.

    The second thing we need to do as fathers is pass along the value of empathy to our children. Not sympathy, but empathy - the ability to stand in somebody else's shoes; to look at the world through their eyes. Sometimes it's so easy to get caught up in "us," that we forget about our obligations to one another. There's a culture in our society that says remembering these obligations is somehow soft - that we can't show weakness, and so therefore we can't show kindness.

    But our young boys and girls see that. They see when you are ignoring or mistreating your wife. They see when you are inconsiderate at home; or when you are distant; or when you are thinking only of yourself. And so it's no surprise when we see that behavior in our schools or on our streets. That's why we pass on the values of empathy and kindness to our children by living them. We need to show our kids that you're not strong by putting other people down - you're strong by lifting them up. That's our responsibility as fathers.

    And by the way - it's a responsibility that also extends to Washington. Because if fathers are doing their part; if they're taking our responsibilities seriously to be there for their children, and set high expectations for them, and instill in them a sense of excellence and empathy, then our government should meet them halfway.

    We should be making it easier for fathers who make responsible choices and harder for those who avoid them. We should get rid of the financial penalties we impose on married couples right now, and start making sure that every dime of child support goes directly to helping children instead of some bureaucrat. We should reward fathers who pay that child support with job training and job opportunities and a larger Earned Income Tax Credit that can help them pay the bills. We should expand programs where registered nurses visit expectant and new mothers and help them learn how to care for themselves before the baby is born and what to do after - programs that have helped increase father involvement, women's employment, and children's readiness for school. We should help these new families care for their children by expanding maternity and paternity leave, and we should guarantee every worker more paid sick leave so they can stay home to take care of their child without losing their income.

    We should take all of these steps to build a strong foundation for our children. But we should also know that even if we do; even if we meet our obligations as fathers and parents; even if Washington does its part too, we will still face difficult challenges in our lives. There will still be days of struggle and heartache. The rains will still come and the winds will still blow.

    And that is why the final lesson we must learn as fathers is also the greatest gift we can pass on to our children - and that is the gift of hope.

    I'm not talking about an idle hope that's little more than blind optimism or willful ignorance of the problems we face. I'm talking about hope as that spirit inside us that insists, despite all evidence to the contrary, that something better is waiting for us if we're willing to work for it and fight for it. If we are willing to believe.

    I was answering questions at a town hall meeting in Wisconsin the other day and a young man raised his hand, and I figured he'd ask about college tuition or energy or maybe the war in Iraq. But instead he looked at me very seriously and he asked, "What does life mean to you?"

    Now, I have to admit that I wasn't quite prepared for that one. I think I stammered for a little bit, but then I stopped and gave it some thought, and I said this:

    When I was a young man, I thought life was all about me - how do I make my way in the world, and how do I become successful and how do I get the things that I want.

    But now, my life revolves around my two little girls. And what I think about is what kind of world I'm leaving them. Are they living in a county where there's a huge gap between a few who are wealthy and a whole bunch of people who are struggling every day? Are they living in a county that is still divided by race? A country where, because they're girls, they don't have as much opportunity as boys do? Are they living in a country where we are hated around the world because we don't cooperate effectively with other nations? Are they living a world that is in grave danger because of what we've done to its climate?

    And what I've realized is that life doesn't count for much unless you're willing to do your small part to leave our children - all of our children - a better world. Even if it's difficult. Even if the work seems great. Even if we don't get very far in our lifetime.

     

    That is our ultimate responsibility as fathers and parents. We try. We hope. We do what we can to build our house upon the sturdiest rock. And when the winds come, and the rains fall, and they beat upon that house, we keep faith that our Father will be there to guide us, and watch over us, and protect us, and lead His children through the darkest of storms into light of a better day. That is my prayer for all of us on this Father's Day, and that is my hope for this country in the years ahead. May God Bless you and your children. Thank you.

     [QUOTE]

    No one says he hasn't. It needs to be a top priority.

    More than gun control!

    He should call out people like Sharpton and Jackson and other leaders in the black community; not in a negative way but, challenge them to talk about the real issues and not just make every one feel or seem like victim!

    The community will thrive and excel with the right leadership and the right message!

     
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    Re: Bigots are the people who chose to ignore the problem; please lead Mr. President!

    In response to WhatDoYouWantNow's comment:

    In response to tvoter's comment:
    [QUOTE]No one says he hasn't.




    Well, except the guy who suggested he was a "bigot" for not doing so (apparently, and typically, not knowing what "bigot" even means).

     

    [QUOTE]

    Bigots are the people who chose to ignore the problem; please lead Mr. President![


    [/QUOTE]


    ;< semi-colon - Indicates break in sentence to start another independent sentence I.E.

    Bigots are the people who choose to ignore the problem (;) < semi-colon Please lead Mr. President

    So, it is in no way saying the POTUS is a bigot. It is simply asking him to lead!

    but, nice try to IGNORE the issue

     

     

     

     
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    Re: Bigots are the people who chose to ignore the problem; please lead Mr. President!

    In response to Sistersledge's comment:

    In response to chiefhowie's comment:
    [QUOTE]

     

    In response to Sistersledge's comment:

    [QUOTE]

     

     


     

     



     

     

     

    [/QUOTE]


    I know that the person getting his wallet lifted can't be a conservative ...... everybody knows that they keep their dough in coffee cans buried in their backyards

     

    [/QUOTE]

    The person getting their wallets lifted are comprised of legal working Americans.. you know.. the middle class. The "lifter" is our corrupt govt.

    Have a nice day comrade.

     
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    Re: Bigots are the people who chose to ignore the problem; please lead Mr. President!

    In response to WhatDoYouWantNow's comment:

     

     

    semi-colon - Indicates break in sentence to start another independent sentence

     

     

    Semicolons are used to imply a relationship between two related ideas without including a written explicit statement that they are linked.

    For example: tvoter goes to bed early; he's afraid of the dark.

    The semicolon here implies the unstated word "because"

    Very rarely will a semicolon properly be used to link two independent clauses, and it is only so used when the clauses are complex - for example - containing many commas: "Coach Auriemma realized that his next recruiting class contained two superb guards, a fine post player, and a power forward; but as of the end of the spring recruiting season, he was still pushing to discover better first-year players for the interior positions"

     

    That's Fail 1.

     

     

    In response to tvoter's comment:

    Bigots are the people who choose to ignore the problem



    Here is the definition of "bigot":

     

     

     

     

    : a person who is obstinately or intolerantly devoted to his or her own opinions and prejudices; especially : one who regards or treats the members of a group (as a racial or ethnic group) with hatred and intolerance


    See bigot defined for English-language learners »

    See bigot defined for kids »   Examples of BIGOT

    1. He was labeled a bigot after making some offensive comments.
    2. <an incorrigible bigot who hasn't entertained a new thought in years>
    3. It's scandalous, he said, in the tones once used by Colonel Blimp, Britain's best-loved bigot, who adorned the pages of the Evening Standard throughout the 1930s. —Nicholas Fraser, Harper's, September 1996

     

     

    That's Fail 2.

     

     

      It is simply asking him to lead!

     

     

     

    You shouldn't refer to yourself as "it"

    That is Fail 3.

     

     

     

     

     

      It is simply asking him to lead!

     

     


    He did. That is fail 4.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    In response to DamainAllen's comment:
    [QUOTE]

     

    I am continuing to be surprised by people calling for the president to rally black men, lecture them on violence, on responsibility, etc when he has and continues to do those very things.  He did so at his commencement address to Morehouse College, a historically black all male university, and did so even more pointedly in his Fathers Day address, almost a full month before the Zimmerman verdict and his subsequent comments on that issue:

    _______________________________________________________________________

    Father's Day speech at Apostolic Church of God a largely Black congregation on Chicago's South Side:

     

    Of all the rocks upon which we build our lives, we are reminded today that family is the most important. And we are called to recognize and honor how critical every father is to that foundation. They are teachers and coaches. They are mentors and role models. They are examples of success and the men who constantly push us toward it.

    But if we are honest with ourselves, we'll admit that what too many fathers also are is missing - missing from too many lives and too many homes. They have abandoned their responsibilities, acting like boys instead of men. And the foundations of our families are weaker because of it.

    You and I know how true this is in the African-American community. We know that more than half of all black children live in single-parent households, a number that has doubled - doubled - since we were children. We know the statistics - that children who grow up without a father are five times more likely to live in poverty and commit crime; nine times more likely to drop out of schools and twenty times more likely to end up in prison. They are more likely to have behavioral problems, or run away from home, or become teenage parents themselves. And the foundations of our community are weaker because of it.

    How many times in the last year has this city lost a child at the hands of another child? How many times have our hearts stopped in the middle of the night with the sound of a gunshot or a siren? How many teenagers have we seen hanging around on street corners when they should be sitting in a classroom? How many are sitting in prison when they should be working, or at least looking for a job? How many in this generation are we willing to lose to poverty or violence or addiction? How many?

    Yes, we need more cops on the street. Yes, we need fewer guns in the hands of people who shouldn't have them. Yes, we need more money for our schools, and more outstanding teachers in the classroom, and more afterschool programs for our children. Yes, we need more jobs and more job training and more opportunity in our communities.

    But we also need families to raise our children. We need fathers to realize that responsibility does not end at conception. We need them to realize that what makes you a man is not the ability to have a child - it's the courage to raise one.

    We need to help all the mothers out there who are raising these kids by themselves; the mothers who drop them off at school, go to work, pick up them up in the afternoon, work another shift, get dinner, make lunches, pay the bills, fix the house, and all the other things it takes both parents to do. So many of these women are doing a heroic job, but they need support. They need another parent. Their children need another parent. That's what keeps their foundation strong. It's what keeps the foundation of our country strong.

    I know what it means to have an absent father, although my circumstances weren't as tough as they are for many young people today. Even though my father left us when I was two years old, and I only knew him from the letters he wrote and the stories that my family told, I was luckier than most. I grew up in Hawaii, and had two wonderful grandparents from Kansas who poured everything they had into helping my mother raise my sister and me - who worked with her to teach us about love and respect and the obligations we have to one another. I screwed up more often than I should've, but I got plenty of second chances. And even though we didn't have a lot of money, scholarships gave me the opportunity to go to some of the best schools in the country. A lot of kids don't get these chances today. There is no margin for error in their lives. So my own story is different in that way.

    Still, I know the toll that being a single parent took on my mother - how she struggled at times to the pay bills; to give us the things that other kids had; to play all the roles that both parents are supposed to play. And I know the toll it took on me. So I resolved many years ago that it was my obligation to break the cycle - that if I could be anything in life, I would be a good father to my girls; that if I could give them anything, I would give them that rock - that foundation - on which to build their lives. And that would be the greatest gift I could offer.

    I say this knowing that I have been an imperfect father - knowing that I have made mistakes and will continue to make more; wishing that I could be home for my girls and my wife more than I am right now. I say this knowing all of these things because even as we are imperfect, even as we face difficult circumstances, there are still certain lessons we must strive to live and learn as fathers - whether we are black or white; rich or poor; from the South Side or the wealthiest suburb.

    The first is setting an example of excellence for our children - because if we want to set high expectations for them, we've got to set high expectations for ourselves. It's great if you have a job; it's even better if you have a college degree. It's a wonderful thing if you are married and living in a home with your children, but don't just sit in the house and watch "SportsCenter" all weekend long. That's why so many children are growing up in front of the television. As fathers and parents, we've got to spend more time with them, and help them with their homework, and replace the video game or the remote control with a book once in awhile. That's how we build that foundation.

    We know that education is everything to our children's future. We know that they will no longer just compete for good jobs with children from Indiana, but children from India and China and all over the world. We know the work and the studying and the level of education that requires.

    You know, sometimes I'll go to an eighth-grade graduation and there's all that pomp and circumstance and gowns and flowers. And I think to myself, it's just eighth grade. To really compete, they need to graduate high school, and then they need to graduate college, and they probably need a graduate degree too. An eighth-grade education doesn't cut it today. Let's give them a handshake and tell them to get their butts back in the library!

    It's up to us - as fathers and parents - to instill this ethic of excellence in our children. It's up to us to say to our daughters, don't ever let images on TV tell you what you are worth, because I expect you to dream without limit and reach for those goals. It's up to us to tell our sons, those songs on the radio may glorify violence, but in my house we live glory to achievement, self respect, and hard work. It's up to us to set these high expectations. And that means meeting those expectations ourselves. That means setting examples of excellence in our own lives.

    The second thing we need to do as fathers is pass along the value of empathy to our children. Not sympathy, but empathy - the ability to stand in somebody else's shoes; to look at the world through their eyes. Sometimes it's so easy to get caught up in "us," that we forget about our obligations to one another. There's a culture in our society that says remembering these obligations is somehow soft - that we can't show weakness, and so therefore we can't show kindness.

    But our young boys and girls see that. They see when you are ignoring or mistreating your wife. They see when you are inconsiderate at home; or when you are distant; or when you are thinking only of yourself. And so it's no surprise when we see that behavior in our schools or on our streets. That's why we pass on the values of empathy and kindness to our children by living them. We need to show our kids that you're not strong by putting other people down - you're strong by lifting them up. That's our responsibility as fathers.

    And by the way - it's a responsibility that also extends to Washington. Because if fathers are doing their part; if they're taking our responsibilities seriously to be there for their children, and set high expectations for them, and instill in them a sense of excellence and empathy, then our government should meet them halfway.

    We should be making it easier for fathers who make responsible choices and harder for those who avoid them. We should get rid of the financial penalties we impose on married couples right now, and start making sure that every dime of child support goes directly to helping children instead of some bureaucrat. We should reward fathers who pay that child support with job training and job opportunities and a larger Earned Income Tax Credit that can help them pay the bills. We should expand programs where registered nurses visit expectant and new mothers and help them learn how to care for themselves before the baby is born and what to do after - programs that have helped increase father involvement, women's employment, and children's readiness for school. We should help these new families care for their children by expanding maternity and paternity leave, and we should guarantee every worker more paid sick leave so they can stay home to take care of their child without losing their income.

    We should take all of these steps to build a strong foundation for our children. But we should also know that even if we do; even if we meet our obligations as fathers and parents; even if Washington does its part too, we will still face difficult challenges in our lives. There will still be days of struggle and heartache. The rains will still come and the winds will still blow.

    And that is why the final lesson we must learn as fathers is also the greatest gift we can pass on to our children - and that is the gift of hope.

    I'm not talking about an idle hope that's little more than blind optimism or willful ignorance of the problems we face. I'm talking about hope as that spirit inside us that insists, despite all evidence to the contrary, that something better is waiting for us if we're willing to work for it and fight for it. If we are willing to believe.

    I was answering questions at a town hall meeting in Wisconsin the other day and a young man raised his hand, and I figured he'd ask about college tuition or energy or maybe the war in Iraq. But instead he looked at me very seriously and he asked, "What does life mean to you?"

    Now, I have to admit that I wasn't quite prepared for that one. I think I stammered for a little bit, but then I stopped and gave it some thought, and I said this:

    When I was a young man, I thought life was all about me - how do I make my way in the world, and how do I become successful and how do I get the things that I want.

    But now, my life revolves around my two little girls. And what I think about is what kind of world I'm leaving them. Are they living in a county where there's a huge gap between a few who are wealthy and a whole bunch of people who are struggling every day? Are they living in a county that is still divided by race? A country where, because they're girls, they don't have as much opportunity as boys do? Are they living in a country where we are hated around the world because we don't cooperate effectively with other nations? Are they living a world that is in grave danger because of what we've done to its climate?

    And what I've realized is that life doesn't count for much unless you're willing to do your small part to leave our children - all of our children - a better world. Even if it's difficult. Even if the work seems great. Even if we don't get very far in our lifetime.

     

    That is our ultimate responsibility as fathers and parents. We try. We hope. We do what we can to build our house upon the sturdiest rock. And when the winds come, and the rains fall, and they beat upon that house, we keep faith that our Father will be there to guide us, and watch over us, and protect us, and lead His children through the darkest of storms into light of a better day. That is my prayer for all of us on this Father's Day, and that is my hope for this country in the years ahead. May God Bless you and your children. Thank you.



    LOL

     

    So you are so sad you are pointing out what you wrongly think are grammarical errors instead of addressing the issue?

    Please. you are just distracting because you have no f'ing excuse for being obtuse!

    Good day now go back to the do nothing blame game and let adults stay on topic little man.

     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from tvoter. Show tvoter's posts

    Re: Bigots are the people who chose to ignore the problem; please lead Mr. President!

    In response to WhatDoYouWantNow's comment:

     

    Damain already covered it.

     Another empty thread. You just hate Obama, like all fair and balanced above-it-alls. We get it.

     




    Damian showed where Obama talked about it in one setting. Im sure there have been a few others as well.

     

    What I am saying that you do not want to hear is that Obama imho has an opportunity to start a promotion of stronger core values in our young people in the nation as well as the inner city communities.

    If he would take a whirl wind tour like he has for gun control, taxes, ACA etc and talk to people especially in low income areas about their youth and encouraging adults to be better role models for "Finishing high school, staying away from drug use, building a life for youself before starting a family;  he can set goals for community leaders to push initiatives in these areas of youth development to try and build the better tomorrow the govt has failed miserably at over the last 50 years!

    HE is the best ooportunity since MLK to really make positive change in some areas that many just want to ignore for whatever reasons!

     He should encourage community leaders to help youth set clear positive goals fore their future and define a path for achieving those goals

     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from UserName99. Show UserName99's posts

    Re: Bigots are the people who chose to ignore the problem; please lead Mr. President!

    In response to tvoter's comment:

    In response to WhatDoYouWantNow's comment:

     

    Damain already covered it.

     Another empty thread. You just hate Obama, like all fair and balanced above-it-alls. We get it.

     




    Damian showed where Obama talked about it in one setting. Im sure there have been a few others as well.

     

    What I am saying that you do not want to hear is that Obama imho has an opportunity to start a promotion of stronger core values in our young people in the nation as well as the inner city communities.

    If he would take a whirl wind tour like he has for gun control, taxes, ACA etc and talk to people especially in low income areas about their youth and encouraging adults to be better role models for "Finishing high school, staying away from drug use, building a life for youself before starting a family;  he can set goals for community leaders to push initiatives in these areas of youth development to try and build the better tomorrow the govt has failed miserably at over the last 50 years!

    HE is the best ooportunity since MLK to really make positive change in some areas that many just want to ignore for whatever reasons!

     He should encourage community leaders to help youth set clear positive goals fore their future and define a path for achieving those goals




    HaHa....Like you wouldn't whine like a toddler if the president did a whirlwind tour to preach values. 

     

     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from tvoter. Show tvoter's posts

    Re: Bigots are the people who chose to ignore the problem; please lead Mr. President!

    In response to WhatDoYouWantNow's comment:

    In response to tvoter's comment:

    [QUOTE]

    Damian showed where Obama talked about it in one setting. Im sure there have been a few others as well.

    What I am saying that you do not want to hear is that Obama imho has an opportunity to start a promote stronger values in the nations as well as the inner city communities.

    If he would take a whirl wind tour like he has for gun control, taxes, ACA etc and talk to people especially in low income areas about their youth and encouraging adults to be better role models for "Finishing high school, staying away from drug use, building a life for youself before starting a family;  he can set goals for community leaders to push initiatives in these areas of youth development to try and build the better tomorrow the govt has failed miserably at over the last 50 years!

    HE is the best ooportunity since MLK to really make positive change in some areas that many just want to ignore for whatever reasons!

     

     

     

     

     




     

     

    Ok, so you're toning down the thread and that's fine. It's not that he isn't "lead[ing]," it's that he hasn't done as much as you want him to on this front.

    That's fine. I recall plenty of other instances in which he has said the things you want him to. Maybe you know about them, maybe not. That's fine too.

     

    Here's the problem: He's surrounded by a media and public that has also demanded he make:

    -  health care / Obamacare #1.

    - The economy #1

    And of course all the distractions: Benghazi smears, IRS troubles, etc.

     

     

    Unfortunately I could not collect absent a crystal ball, but I'd be willing to bet that if he did go on a "motivate black people tour," the uproar would be "is this really the time for this? The economy sucks! Why are you ignoring the economy!"

     And of course, Al Sharpton would probably try to convince other black peopl that Obama is somehow a self-hating black person. 

    Frankly, I think what you demand is much more suited for post-Presidency. He'll still have authority on that front post-Presidency, and he really will have the time and money to devote to it. After all, 400k/yr for life... 

    [/QUOTE]

    Are you seriously saying he has done plenty, doesnt have tome for more, has too many distractions and people will rebuff him to make it hard?

    Well then I guess we wait for him to be an ex POTUS and hope he can lead then.

     

     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from tvoter. Show tvoter's posts

    Re: Bigots are the people who chose to ignore the problem; please lead Mr. President!

    In response to UserName99's comment:

    In response to tvoter's comment:
    [QUOTE]

     

    In response to WhatDoYouWantNow's comment:

     

    Damain already covered it.

     Another empty thread. You just hate Obama, like all fair and balanced above-it-alls. We get it.

     




    Damian showed where Obama talked about it in one setting. Im sure there have been a few others as well.

     

    What I am saying that you do not want to hear is that Obama imho has an opportunity to start a promotion of stronger core values in our young people in the nation as well as the inner city communities.

    If he would take a whirl wind tour like he has for gun control, taxes, ACA etc and talk to people especially in low income areas about their youth and encouraging adults to be better role models for "Finishing high school, staying away from drug use, building a life for youself before starting a family;  he can set goals for community leaders to push initiatives in these areas of youth development to try and build the better tomorrow the govt has failed miserably at over the last 50 years!

    HE is the best ooportunity since MLK to really make positive change in some areas that many just want to ignore for whatever reasons!

     He should encourage community leaders to help youth set clear positive goals fore their future and define a path for achieving those goals

     




     

    HaHa....Like you wouldn't whine like a toddler if the president did a whirlwind tour to preach values. 

     

    [/QUOTE]

    lol, we'll never know, lets just keep doing the same things for another 50 years and hope it gets better!

    what a waste

     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from tvoter. Show tvoter's posts

    Re: Bigots are the people who chose to ignore the problem; please lead Mr. President!

    In response to WhatDoYouWantNow's comment:

    In response to tvoter's comment:
    [QUOTE]people will rebuff him



    Yes. In fact - again it relies on a crystal ball - but based on what you have posed her I would be shocked if you didn'tcomplain that he was on an "apology tour" instead of focusing on the economy if he did what you here demand.


    [/QUOTE]

    lol, apology?

    It would be completely opposite from an apology and I for one would love to se the POTUS make a committed effort (with the media and everyone else) to address the issues that are a plaque in inner cities with violence, low graduation rates, drug abuse, teen pregnancy, and single parent families in inner cities.

     

     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from Sistersledge. Show Sistersledge's posts

    Re: Bigots are the people who chose to ignore the problem; please lead Mr. President!

    double p's you have a job .....  are you trying to tell me that you are hard working .... if you are hard at work how do you have the time to be post on BDC ?

     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from Sistersledge. Show Sistersledge's posts

    Re: Bigots are the people who chose to ignore the problem; please lead Mr. President!

    In response to tvoter's comment:

     


    Apparently sister would rather our nation ignore the problem and just continue to do the same blame game while propping up of irresponsible behavior through govt programs that keep people on the plantation.

    Make a difference talk about the real issues are stfu!

     




    Sorry tv voter I have no idea what the originally cut and pasted in your first comment is all about  .... all I need to do is read the headline which is about bigots,  you blaming the President for not leading ... btw I did notice that faux news was mentioned somewhere in the article so I know it's a hit piece and then I give the article and you what you deserve which is to make  a joke out of it ....

     

     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from tvoter. Show tvoter's posts

    Re: Bigots are the people who chose to ignore the problem; please lead Mr. President!

    In response to WhatDoYouWantNow's comment:



    Yes. In fact - again it relies on a crystal ball - but based on what you have posed her I would be shocked if you didn'tcomplain that he was on an "apology tour" instead of focusing on the economy if he did what you here demand.

    [QUOTE]

    I see, since people mayu not like it dont do anything to stop it.

    gotcha, lets just throw more money at the problem, blame others and use it as a political tool for another 50 years without really trying to help the situation.

    sigh

     

     

     

     



    lol, apology?

     

     

    It would be completely opposite from an apology and I for one would love to se the POTUS make a committed effort (with the media and everyone else) to address the issues that are a plaque in inner cities with violence, low graduation rates, drug abuse, teen pregnancy, and single parent families in inner cities.

     

     

    [/QUOTE]


     

    All I can say is that I would anticipate that you would slam him for not focusing on the economy, and for being "divisive" for focusing on only the troubles of black people when there are plenty of strugglingwhites and miorities.

    It's a crystall ball position, sure, but your posting pattern points heavily towards it.

     

     

    [/QUOTE]


     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from Sistersledge. Show Sistersledge's posts

    Re: Bigots are the people who chose to ignore the problem; please lead Mr. President!

    In response to WhatDoYouWantNow's comment:

    In response to Sistersledge's comment:

    [QUOTE]

     

    double p's you have a job .....  are you trying to tell me that you are hard working .... if you are hard at work how do you have the time to be post on BDC ?

     




    Pretty sure he's NO MO O's newest racially questionable reincarnation. Could be wrong though.

     

    [/QUOTE]


    I forgot all about that fool .

     

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