Can Jindal be a change agent from within?

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    Can Jindal be a change agent from within?

    Could this be the start of the change to a new Republican Party? 

    Jindal is sounding a lot like Huntsman who tried to steer the GOP away from the social conservative landmines and into the right direction during the last cycle. Jindal will yield a lot of power as the Chair of the Republican Governors Association and he has 29 other good governors to work with many of them young and moderate.

    The first thing they need to do is to rebrand the party; drop GOP and become the New Republican Party the majority of Americans still believe in small government and a strong private sector economy.

    Jindal stays quiet on 2016 White House bid

     

    Posted by

     

    CNN's Gregory Wallace

     

    (CNN) - Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal is keeping mum about his interest in running for president in 2016, but is speaking out about the Republican Party's direction and will soon find himself with an opportunity to prove his chops as a party leader.

    "I got the best job in the world and I'm going to be focused on being governor of this great state for the next three years and being chairman of RGA next year and getting a bunch of great Republican governors elected," he said in an interview with Politico published Tuesday morning.


    Jindal's answer, which the outlet says was a "dodge" to a direct question about a run for president, comes as he prepares to take the helm of the Republican Governors Association. Next year two governorships currently held by Republicans will be on the ballot.

    Jindal has been seen for several years as a rising star in the GOP who is well-versed in the policy issues, especially entitlements and spending.

    In the interview, he said the GOP needs to "stop being the stupid party" and truly expand its tent.

    "It is no secret we had a number of Republicans damage our brand this year with offensive, bizarre comments - enough of that," he said, according to Politico. "It's not going to be the last time anyone says something stupid within our party, but it can't be tolerated within our party. We've also had enough of this dumbed-down conservatism. We need to stop being simplistic, we need to trust the intelligence of the American people and we need to stop insulting the intelligence of the voters."

    Jindal initially backed the presidential bid of his western neighbor Gov. Rick Perry, then campaigned for and alongside Mitt Romney.

    He was elected to a second term as governor in 2011 and previously was twice elected to the U.S. House. When some speculated he would be a possible vice-presidential candidate, he insisted, "I've got the job that I want."

     

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from DirtyWaterLover. Show DirtyWaterLover's posts

    Re: Can Jindal be a change agent from within?

    Jindal is a Christian Conservative.  He doesn't want the Repubs to change their position.  He just wants the pols to stop taling about their far right agenda.  He wants to outlaw all abortions - he just wants republicans to stop telling the voters about it.

    They still hate minorities.  They still hate women.  They still hate gays.  And they still worship the almighty dollar.  They just don't what voters to know.

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from massmoderateJoe. Show massmoderateJoe's posts

    Re: Can Jindal be a change agent from within?

    In response to DirtyWaterLover's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Jindal is a Christian Conservative.  He doesn't want the Repubs to change their position.  He just wants the pols to stop taling about their far right agenda.  He wants to outlaw all abortions - he just wants republicans to stop telling the voters about it.

    They still hate minorities.  They still hate women.  They still hate gays.  And they still worship the almighty dollar.  They just don't what voters to know.

    [/QUOTE]

    He is prolife but does support limitied abortion for health of mother and rape, hardly a hateful postion, the rest of your rant is just about hate.

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from Firewind. Show Firewind's posts

    Re: Can Jindal be a change agent from within?

    Perhaps the answer to your explicit question is yes.  But I suggest there is better young wine for aging than him in the republican party: Sen. Rubio and Gov. Haley, though it still may be too early to put money on her.

    To the "change agent" point, Gov. Jindal is dynamic, for better or for worse, and so may be useful as a change agent, as was Mrs. Palin.  Useful out on the hustings, and he may age well.

    But to the implied posit, that he's your party's best next hope for president, and so your new hero in your two trial balloons to date here, I suggest that his greatest advantage is that he was not among the flavors of the week in the republican primary parade. 

    Short of that kind of vetting, he's already shown himself to be a loose cannon.  So, change agent?  Yes.  President?  A very tentative maybe, already.  And this is likely how The Republican Establishment is watching.

    Sen. Rubio and Gov. Haley likely check all the boxes your party seeks to check.

    I suggest that today the smart money is on Sen. Rubio.

     

     

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from massmoderateJoe. Show massmoderateJoe's posts

    Re: Can Jindal be a change agent from within?

    In response to Firewind's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Perhaps the answer to your explicit question is yes.  But I suggest there is better young wine for aging than him in the republican party: Sen. Rubio and Gov. Haley, though it still may be too early to put money on her.

    To the "change agent" point, Gov. Jindal is dynamic, for better or for worse, and so may be useful as a change agent, as was Mrs. Palin.  Useful out on the hustings, and he may age well.

    But to the implied posit, that he's your party's best next hope for president, and so your new hero in your two trial balloons to date here, I suggest that his greatest advantage is that he was not among the flavors of the week in the republican primary parade. 

    Short of that kind of vetting, he's already shown himself to be a loose cannon.  So, change agent?  Yes.  President?  A very tentative maybe, already.  And this is likely how The Republican Establishment is watching.

    Sen. Rubio and Gov. Haley likely check all the boxes your party seeks to check.

    I suggest that today the smart money is on Sen. Rubio.

     

     

    [/QUOTE]

    I'm not there for who should be top of the ticket in 2016 but there is a good list provide the party rebrands itself over the next few years.  If Rubio plays an active roll in immigration reform he could ride a strong wave of support.

    Generally governors make better Presidents because they understand leadership.  My long list; Huntsman one more try, Christy the new post Sandy model, Jeb Bush, Ryan, Jindal, Rubio, Nicky Haley

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from massmoderateJoe. Show massmoderateJoe's posts

    Re: Can Jindal be a change agent from within?

    In response to WhatDoYouWantNow's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    "The president's campaign, if you will, focused on giving targeted groups a big gift. He made a big effort on small things."

    That was Mitt Romney explaining his election loss to his big-dollar donors during a conference call Wednesday. Slate's Will Saletan and David Weigel have already dug into that quote (and those that accompanied it) and what it says about Romney. But in the meantime, Romney's fellow Republicans—those still in office and/or those harboring dreams of higher office—wasted little time putting some space between themselves and their former presidential nominee.

    Here was Bobby Jindal, the new head of the Republican Governors Association who is seen as a potential 2016 candidate, via the Los Angeles Times:

    Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal said Romney’s comments just hours earlier in a conference call with top donors were "absolutely wrong."
    "We have got to stop dividing the American voters," Jindal ... told reporters here. "If we’re going to continue to be a competitive party and win elections on the national stage, and continue to fight for our conservative principles, we need two messages to get out loudly and clearly. One, we are fighting for 100% of the votes. And second, our policies benefit every American who wants to pursue the American dream, period."

    And Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker, via CNN:

    Walker—who was sitting on a panel with Jindal when the Louisiana governor fired off—said the GOP isn't "just for people who are currently not dependent on the government."
    "It's for all Americans," he continued, adding that the Republican Party is the party "that helps people find a pathway to live the American Dream."

    Politico's Mike Allen spoke with an untold number of establishment Republicans to take their temperature yesterday. Here's how he laid out the general GOP reaction inside the Beltway:

    1) Republicans we talked to said this sounded like sour grapes, and were sad that Romney’s first comments were bitter and backward-looking. 2) His analysis is incomplete to inaccurate: Obama didn’t win Janesville, Iowa or New Hampshire because of gifts to minorities. 3) This mindset is at odds with the views of most other prominent Republicans, who say the party needs to do some heavy soul-searching and modernizing. Republicans tell us these comments convinced them that Romney just doesn’t get it, and that “47 percent” was no slip of the tongue. 4) Supporters would like Romney to sound like a leader, not a pundit. 5) Why alienate people now, when he could use his fame and platform to start or support some big philanthropic or civic effort?

    [/QUOTE]

    I'm cautiously optimistic that this is hte wake up call the Republicans need; as a fiscal conservative I still identify with their small government and private sector support.

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from Sistersledge. Show Sistersledge's posts

    Re: Can Jindal be a change agent from within?

    How can the governor of 2nd worst state to live in be anything but bad for the rest of the country .

     
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  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from miscricket. Show miscricket's posts

    Re: Can Jindal be a change agent from within?

    I think it is more that the Republican party is trying to rescue itself from the hands of the Tea Party and their unsustainable far right social agenda.

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from DirtyWaterLover. Show DirtyWaterLover's posts

    Re: Can Jindal be a change agent from within?

    In response to TFefio's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to DirtyWaterLover's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Jindal is a Christian Conservative.  He doesn't want the Repubs to change their position.  He just wants the pols to stop taling about their far right agenda.  He wants to outlaw all abortions - he just wants republicans to stop telling the voters about it.

    They still hate minorities.  They still hate women.  They still hate gays.  And they still worship the almighty dollar.  They just don't what voters to know.

    [/QUOTE]
    You forgot the most important. We hate liars from you all the way up to the Whitehouse! 

    Pall the ones you listed are false. 

    [/QUOTE]

    Except when an R following their name.  Then they get nominated for President.

     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from massmoderateJoe. Show massmoderateJoe's posts

    Re: Can Jindal be a change agent from within?

    In response to miscricket's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    I think it is more that the Republican party is trying to rescue itself from the hands of the Tea Party and their unsustainable far right social agenda.

    [/QUOTE]

    The pure Tea Party crowd are fiscal conservatives and lean libertarian on social ssues i.e. they don't care about the social platform.  But there are a number of far right agenda folks who also are fiscal consevaives.

     

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