Eric Cantor will propose a federal law that ends over time pay for hourly workers .

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    Re: Eric Cantor will propose a federal law that ends over time pay for hourly workers .

    In response to WhatDoYouWantNow's comment:

    Does she get the money resulting from "converting" overtime pay? Or not.

    All these quotes seem to be is that if the hourly worker gives up the extra money he would have received for overtime pay, he can take time off later.

    Is that paid time off later?

     

     

    As long as the person can work overtime, keep that money, and not take time off - earning even more - I don't see the issue.

     

     



    The point is for the employee to bank the OT "time" at 1.5 rate and just recieve their normal 40 hr pay check.  They would take the time off during a normal 40 hr work week and get paid for it with a normal 40 hr check.  So if the employee, works 8 hrs OT on Saturday.  The could later take a day and one half off later and still be paid their normal week.  This works well for say a Doctor appt that you need a half day for and later you could take the other 8 hrs for a long weekend.

    If the worker resigned or was let go with comp time on the books they would be paid for the time, in the case above 12 hrs.

     
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    Re: Eric Cantor will propose a federal law that ends over time pay for hourly workers .

    He!!, I would be happy enough with a legislature that worked more than 32 weeks per year.

     

     

     
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    Re: Eric Cantor will propose a federal law that ends over time pay for hourly workers .

    In response to WhatDoYouWantNow's comment:

    In response to massmoderateJoe's comment:

     

    In response to WhatDoYouWantNow's comment:

     

    Does she get the money resulting from "converting" overtime pay? Or not.

    All these quotes seem to be is that if the hourly worker gives up the extra money he would have received for overtime pay, he can take time off later.

    Is that paid time off later?

     

     

    As long as the person can work overtime, keep that money, and not take time off - earning even more - I don't see the issue.

     

     

     



    The point is for the employee to bankthe OT "time" at 1.5 rate and just recieve their normal 40 hr pay check.  They would take the time off during a normal 40 hr work week and get paid for it with a normal 40 hr check.  So if the employee, works 8 hrs OT on Saturday.  The could later take a day and one half off later and still be paid their normal week.  This works well for say a Doctor appt that you need a half day for and later you could take the other 8 hrs for a long weekend.

     

    If the worker resigned or was let go with comp time on the books they would be paid for the time, in the case above 12 hrs.

     




     

    Ok. As long as it's up to the employee,  then it seems like a perfectly good idea to me.

    Just as long as, as airborne says, the employer doesn't get to tell the employee "you worked X hrs OT, so you're taking two days off." Since maybe the employee wanted to work those days, too.

     

     



    I understand, and that is the desire.  But I know of a number of firms that have done some furlough time in an effort to avoid layoffs when things are light.  Usually in firms that have a comptime policy the time is taken off and scheduled under the firms normal vacation scheduling policy.  That is, the employer needs some say in the scheduling of time off, otherwise everyone might want to take of the 4th of July week and that can't happen.

     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from tvoter. Show tvoter's posts

    Re: Eric Cantor will propose a federal law that ends over time pay for hourly workers .

    In response to MattyScornD's comment:

    He!!, I would be happy enough with a legislature that worked more than 32 weeks per year.

      




    HEAR HEAR!!

     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from miscricket. Show miscricket's posts

    Re: Eric Cantor will propose a federal law that ends over time pay for hourly workers .

    In response to MattyScornD's comment:

    He!!, I would be happy enough with a legislature that worked more than 32 weeks per year.

     

     




    Amen to that..!!!

     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from miscricket. Show miscricket's posts

    Re: Eric Cantor will propose a federal law that ends over time pay for hourly workers .

    In response to WhatDoYouWantNow's comment:

    In response to massmoderateJoe's comment:

     

    In response to WhatDoYouWantNow's comment:

     

    Does she get the money resulting from "converting" overtime pay? Or not.

    All these quotes seem to be is that if the hourly worker gives up the extra money he would have received for overtime pay, he can take time off later.

    Is that paid time off later?

     

     

    As long as the person can work overtime, keep that money, and not take time off - earning even more - I don't see the issue.

     

     

     



    The point is for the employee to bankthe OT "time" at 1.5 rate and just recieve their normal 40 hr pay check.  They would take the time off during a normal 40 hr work week and get paid for it with a normal 40 hr check.  So if the employee, works 8 hrs OT on Saturday.  The could later take a day and one half off later and still be paid their normal week.  This works well for say a Doctor appt that you need a half day for and later you could take the other 8 hrs for a long weekend.

     

    If the worker resigned or was let go with comp time on the books they would be paid for the time, in the case above 12 hrs.

     




     

    Ok. As long as it's up to the employee,  then it seems like a perfectly good idea to me.

    Just as long as, as airborne says, the employer doesn't get to tell the employee "you worked X hrs OT, so you're taking two days off." Since maybe the employee wanted to work those days, too.

     

     




    If the employee has a choice on whether to bank the OT for future time off or be paid for it..then potentially I don't see an issue either. However..we shouldn't believe for one millisecond that this is going to provide the kind of freedom and flexibility  that Cantor is trying to sell. The goverment..as an employer..is notoriously generous when it comes to benefits and flexibility...but don't count on the same generousity and flexibility from private employers. Most private employers require employees to use any "comp time" within the same pay period. Even those who are allowed to bank time would likely have a limited amount of time to use it. Even then..it is at the whim of the employer.

     
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