He too believed the promises. Now he faces prosecution for telling his story.

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from tvoter. Show tvoter's posts

    He too believed the promises. Now he faces prosecution for telling his story.

    A 29-year-old man who says he is a former undercover CIA employee said Sunday that he was the principal source of recent disclosures about ­top-secret National Security Agency programs, exposing himself to possible prosecution in an acknowledgment that had little if any precedent in the long history of U.S. intelligence leaks.

    Edward Snowden, a tech specialist who has contracted for the NSA and works for the consulting firm Booz Allen Hamilton, unmasked himself as a source after a string of stories in The Washington Post and the Guardian that detailed previously unknown U.S. surveillance programs. He said he disclosed secret documents in response to what he described as the systematic surveillance of innocent citizens.

    In an interview Sunday, Snowden said he is willing to face the consequences of exposure.

    “I’m not going to hide,” Snowden told The Post from Hong Kong, where he has been staying. “Allowing the U.S. government to intimidate its people with threats of retaliation for revealing wrongdoing is contrary to the public interest.”

    Asked whether he believes that his disclosures will change anything, he said: “I think they already have. Everyone everywhere now understands how bad things have gotten — and they’re talking about it. They have the power to decide for themselves whether they are willing to sacrifice their privacy to the surveillance state.”

    Snowden said nobody had been aware of his actions, including those closest to him. He said there was no single event that spurred his decision to leak the information, but he said President Obama has failed to live up to his pledges of transparency.

    “My sole motive is to inform the public as to that which is done in their name and that which is done against them,” he said in a note that accompanied the first document he leaked to The Post.

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/intelligence-leaders-push-back-on-leakers-media/2013/06/09/fff80160-d122-11e2-a73e-826d299ff459_print.html

     
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  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from massmoderateJoe. Show massmoderateJoe's posts

    Re: He too believed the promises. Now he faces prosecution for telling his story.

    In response to tvoter's comment:

    A 29-year-old man who says he is a former undercover CIA employee said Sunday that he was the principal source of recent disclosures about ­top-secret National Security Agency programs, exposing himself to possible prosecution in an acknowledgment that had little if any precedent in the long history of U.S. intelligence leaks.

    Edward Snowden, a tech specialist who has contracted for the NSA and works for the consulting firm Booz Allen Hamilton, unmasked himself as a source after a string of stories in The Washington Post and the Guardian that detailed previously unknown U.S. surveillance programs. He said he disclosed secret documents in response to what he described as the systematic surveillance of innocent citizens.

    In an interview Sunday, Snowden said he is willing to face the consequences of exposure.

    “I’m not going to hide,” Snowden told The Post from Hong Kong, where he has been staying. “Allowing the U.S. government to intimidate its people with threats of retaliation for revealing wrongdoing is contrary to the public interest.”

    Asked whether he believes that his disclosures will change anything, he said: “I think they already have. Everyone everywhere now understands how bad things have gotten — and they’re talking about it. They have the power to decide for themselves whether they are willing to sacrifice their privacy to the surveillance state.”

    Snowden said nobody had been aware of his actions, including those closest to him. He said there was no single event that spurred his decision to leak the information, but he said President Obama has failed to live up to his pledges of transparency.

    “My sole motive is to inform the public as to that which is done in their name and that which is done against them,” he said in a note that accompanied the first document he leaked to The Post.

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/intelligence-leaders-push-back-on-leakers-media/2013/06/09/fff80160-d122-11e2-a73e-826d299ff459_print.html



    I'm generally OK with the government doing its best to keep the US safe.  Do I like it; no... but just like you have to break a few eggs to make an omlet in today's world we need to do what we can to keep safe.

    What amuses me is that the left was outraged over the idea of the Bush Administration doing this and now we find out the the Obama Administration took a Bush idea and has perfected it...priceless.

     

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from tvoter. Show tvoter's posts

    Re: He too believed the promises. Now he faces prosecution for telling his story.


    I do not think what they are doing is illegal. I do think it too much data collection and mining on innocent people. I do not think they are abusing it right now; I do think if allowed to continue abuse is almost certain and with this type of data mining in conjuction with technologoes ability to search though billions of pieces of information and correlate based on 1 or two words. It could be the used for very wrong reasons, politically, and otherwise.

    If, it continues it requires alot more oversight imho.

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from massmoderateJoe. Show massmoderateJoe's posts

    Re: He too believed the promises. Now he faces prosecution for telling his story.

    In response to tvoter's comment:


    I do not think what they are doing is illegal. I do think it too much data collection and mining on innocent people. I do not think they are abusing it right now; I do think if allowed to continue abuse is almost certain and with this type of data mining in conjuction with technologoes ability to search though billions of pieces of information and correlate based on 1 or two words. It could be the used for very wrong reasons, politically, and otherwise.

    If, it continues it requires alot more oversight imho.



    I generally agree.

    As I said from what we know the current metadata mining and the Prism operations are creepy and disconcerting.  But I'm much more incensed by the political corruption associated with the IRS and Benghazi.  Right now I'll assume that the data mining and political corruption didn't overlap but they easily could.

     

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