High-profile cases show a pattern of misuse of prosecutorial powers

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from StalkingButler. Show StalkingButler's posts

    High-profile cases show a pattern of misuse of prosecutorial powers

    t’s hard to imagine the U.S. as a place where citizens have to fear overzealous prosecution, but last week’s reversals in the cases of former House Majority Leader Tom DeLay and five New Orleans police officers are part of a troubling pattern reminiscent of the Soviet criminal justice system — a system in which the state is always right, even when it is wrong.

    In both cases, the judges who overturned the original trial-court verdicts cited instances of prosecutorial overzealousness and abuse of power, making the two cases the latest high-profile trials to run aground on the basis of misconduct by the state’s attorneys.

    http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2013/sep/22/high-profile-cases-show-a-pattern-of-misuse-of-pro/

    Delay, Ted Stevens, and now I'm seening that Patrick Fitzgerald is being accused of withholding exculpatory evidence in the Scooter Libby case.

    Nothing says "banana republic" like a political party using the court system to put their opponents in jail.

     

     
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  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from MattyScornD. Show MattyScornD's posts

    Re: High-profile cases show a pattern of misuse of prosecutorial powers

    Is there a Godwin-like equivalent for random invoking of soviet russia to make a (weak) rhetorical point, thus losing the argument...?

    Where is the evidence of a "political party using the court system to put their opponents in jail" so blithely thrown out here like a spitball?

    When did justice stop being blind all of a sudden?  When did prosecutors at ALL levels of the justice system ever stop being "overzealous"?

    Our history is rife with tales of the heavy hands of Law and Order tipping the scales of justice in their favor to achieve the desired (sometimes political...sometimes financial) result.

    One could just as well argue against the efficacy of the appeals process and the political implications of drawing out a court battle as a cynical game of attrition.

     

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from StalkingButler. Show StalkingButler's posts

    Re: High-profile cases show a pattern of misuse of prosecutorial powers

    Perhaps "Soviet" was a little harsh, would "Putinesque" be more acceptable?

     

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    Think for yourself, question authority.

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from MattyScornD. Show MattyScornD's posts

    Re: High-profile cases show a pattern of misuse of prosecutorial powers

    In response to StalkingButler's comment:

     

    Perhaps "Soviet" was a little harsh, would "Putinesque" be more acceptable?

     

     



    How about just owning up and calling it "American".

     

    It’s hard to imagine the U.S. as a place where citizens have to fear overzealous prosecution

     

    It's not hard to imagine at all for some people and groups who have never received truly equitable treatment at the hands of the courts.  Again, history is loaded with examples of this.

     

    One doesn't have to insist upon "exceptionalism" as the only alternative to "imperfect".  As the rest of the world often reminds us, we're not nearly as great as we think we are.  We're good, but we can always be better.  Accepting our flaws is just the first step.

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from ComingLiberalCrackup. Show ComingLiberalCrackup's posts

    Re: High-profile cases show a pattern of misuse of prosecutorial powers

    The outrageous prosecution of Alaska Republican Senator Ted Stevens was a classic example of political abuse of prosecutorial powers......it got a Democrat narrowly elected to the US Senate, and then , oops, after that, came exculpatory evidence held by prosecutors which proved Stevens was innocent.

    Gave the Dems the valuable 60 votes in the Senate they had until Scott Brown was elected.... 

     
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  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from UserName9. Show UserName9's posts

    Re: High-profile cases show a pattern of misuse of prosecutorial powers

    In response to ComingLiberalCrackup's comment:

    Gave the Dems the valuable 60 votes in the Senate they had until Scott Brown was elected.... 




    You're missing a few chapters in your history book there professor.  Namely the contesting of Al Franken's election, and the hospitalization of Senator Byrd.  Like trickle down econmomics, the 2 year Democrat supermajority is another republican myth.

     

     
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