Houston's pro-growth policies have produced an urban powerhouse

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from ComingLiberalCrackup. Show ComingLiberalCrackup's posts

    Houston's pro-growth policies have produced an urban powerhouse

    Texas economic growth makes the liberal Northeast rustbelt. look anemic...Still living in past glory, and ruining private sector economic growth with excess regulations....Texas steals the thunder!


    WSJ:


    "Houston will enjoy the highest growth in new households of any major city between 2014 and 2017. A recent U.S. Council of Mayors study predicted that the American urban order will become increasingly Texan, with Houston and Dallas-Fort Worth both growing larger than Chicago by 2050.Houston's economic success over the past 20 years—and, more remarkably, since the Great Recession and the weak national recovery—rivals the performance of any large metropolitan region in the U.S. For nearly a decade and a half, the city has added jobs at a furious pace—more than 600,000 since early 2000, and 263,000 since early 2008.


    The much more populous greater New York City area has added 103,000 jobs since 2008, and Los Angeles, Chicago, Phoenix, Atlanta and Philadelphia remain well below their 2008 levels in total jobs. Los Angeles and Chicago, like Detroit, have fewer jobs today than they did at the turn of the millennium.


    Many of Houston's jobs pay well, too. Using Praxis Strategy Group calculations that factor in the cost of living as well as salaries, Houston now has among the highest, if not the highest, standard of living of any large city in the U.S. The average cost-of-living-adjusted salary in Houston is about $75,000, compared with around $50,000 in New York and $46,000 in Los Angeles.


    Since 2001, the energy industry has been directly responsible for an increase of 67,000 jobs in Houston, and it now employs more than 240,000 people in the area. These include many technical positions, one reason the region now boasts the highest concentration of engineers outside Silicon Valley. The jobs should keep coming: University of Houston economist Bill Gilmer estimates that $25 billion to $40 billion in new petrochemical facilities is on its way to Greater Houston.


    Houston also has seen a surge in mid-skills jobs (usually requiring a certificate or a two-year degree) in fields such as manufacturing, logistics and construction, as well as energy. Many of these jobs pay more than $100,000 a year. And according to calculations derived from the Bureau of Labor Statistics by the Praxis Strategy Group's Mark Schill, since 2007 Houston has led the 52 major metropolitan areas in creating these jobs, at a rate of 6.6% annually. In contrast, mid-skills jobs have declined by more than 10% in New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, and San Francisco, which have not been friendly to such industries.


    Houston's growth is more than oil-industry luck; it reflects a unique policy environment. The city and its unincorporated areas have no formal zoning, so land use is flexible and can readily meet demand. Getting building permits is simple and quick, with no arbitrary approval boards making development an interminable process. Neighborhoods can protect themselves with voluntary, opt-in deed restrictions or minimum lot sizes.


    The flexible planning regime is also partly responsible for keeping Houston's housing prices relatively low. On a square-foot basis, according to Knight Frank, a London-based real-estate consultancy, the same amount of money buys almost seven times as much space in Houston as it does in San Francisco and more than four times as much as in New York. Houston has built a new kind of "self-organizing" urban model, notes architect and author Lars Lerup, one that he calls "a creature of the market."


    Housing-market flexibility has also benefited some of the city's historically neglected areas.


    Houston's explosive economic growth has engendered another kind of boom: a human one. Between 2000 and 2013, Greater Houston's population expanded by 35%—while New York, Los Angeles, Boston, Philadelphia, and Chicago grew by 4% to 7%. According to a 2012 Rice University study, Greater Houston is now the most ethnically diverse metro region in America, as measured by the balance between four major groups: African-American, white, Asian and Hispanic. "This place is as diverse as California," notes David Yi, a Korean-American energy trader who moved to Houston from Los Angeles in 2013. "But it is affordable, with good schools."


    The last ambitious young private sector entrepeneur leaving the public sector paradise of Moonbatachusetts, turn out the energy-efficient lights...


     

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from slomag. Show slomag's posts

    Re: Houston's pro-growth policies have produced an urban powerhouse

    The Mayor of Houston is a Democrat.

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from ComingLiberalCrackup. Show ComingLiberalCrackup's posts

    Re: Houston's pro-growth policies have produced an urban powerhouse

    In response to slomag's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    The Mayor of Houston is a Democrat.

    [/QUOTE]


    Prior to serving as an elected official, Houston Mayor Parker worked in the oil and gas industry !!

    An evil capitalist, when will she confess to her crime of pollutiing Mother Earth with carbon??

    The moonbat Democrats of Massachusetts will shun her.....

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from high-road. Show high-road's posts

    Re: Houston's pro-growth policies have produced an urban powerhouse

    It's boom and then bust with cities in Texas ... and the state in general.


    I went to college in TX in the 80's, just in time to experience the boom/bust years of the oil industry.


    It was terrible, our sports boosters could barely afford their own Cadillacs, nevermind buying cars for athletes. It was also a great time for pawn brokers ....


    Anytime your economy relies on the price of a comodity buried in the ground whose value is set by ever changing world events, then it will continue on the boom/bust cycle. Houston is the oil refining epicenter of the country. If prices ever fall ... there goes the local economy.


    Ya, ya ... I know, it can't happen this time ... which is the same thing they said last time....

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from DirtyWaterLover. Show DirtyWaterLover's posts

    Re: Houston's pro-growth policies have produced an urban powerhouse

    In response to high-road's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    It's boom and then bust with cities in Texas ... and the state in general.

     

    I went to college in TX in the 80's, just in time to see the bust years of the oil industry.

     

    It was terrible, our sports boosters could barely afford their own Cadillacs, nevermind buying cars for our star athletes. It was also a great time for pawn brokers ....

     

    Anytime your economy relies on the price of a comodity buried in the ground whose value is set by ever changing world events, then it will continue on the boom/bust cycle. Houston is the oil refining epicenter of the country. If prices ever fall ... there goes the local economy.

     

    Ya, ya ... I know, it can't happen this time ... which is the same thing they said last time....

     

     

    [/QUOTE]

    I lived in OKC.  In the early 80s, jobs were a plenty while the rest of the country suffered.

    in the late 80s, the joke was, "How to you get a geologist's attention?"  Oh waiter.

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from DirtyWaterLover. Show DirtyWaterLover's posts

    Re: Houston's pro-growth policies have produced an urban powerhouse

    I thought the rust belt was the area around Pittsburg.

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from ComingLiberalCrackup. Show ComingLiberalCrackup's posts

    Re: Houston's pro-growth policies have produced an urban powerhouse

    In response to high-road's comment:



     




    It's boom and then bust with cities in Texas ... and the state in general.




     




    I went to college in TX in the 80's, just in time to see the bust years of the oil industry.




     




    It was terrible, our sports boosters could barely afford their own Cadillacs, nevermind buying cars for our star athletes. It was also a great time for pawn brokers ....




     




    Anytime your economy relies on the price of a comodity buried in the ground whose value is set by ever changing world events, then it will continue on the boom/bust cycle. Houston is the oil refining epicenter of the country. If prices ever fall ... there goes the local economy.




     




    Ya, ya ... I know, it can't happen this time ... which is the same thing they said last time....




     




     




     



     


     


    No boom or bust , but just a slow decline in the decaying Northeast...

    The Northeast economy isnt based on something so gauche as real hard work getting needed energy supplies, using new technology...


     


    Rather , it is based on the latest in genius liberal policy:  food stamps, welfare,  and disability checks....and endless thousands of do-nothing public sector liberal bureaucrats harassing what's left of the private sector (before they move to Texas)...


    Hardworking private sector families on the Pike heading West, ....public sector bureaucrats and welfare recipients heading East on the Pike...


    Keep it up, Mass will be looking like Detroit some day...

     
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  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from high-road. Show high-road's posts

    Re: Houston's pro-growth policies have produced an urban powerhouse

    Try this again.

     

    And we in the Northeast can afford to take care of our own ... and still afford to pay for the nat'l welfare to subsidize all the slackers in the south/southwest and fly-over states. It will be a proud day indeed when ya'll can stop suckling at the teat of Uncle Sugar and actually attempt to survive on your own ... that may happen in my lifetime ... but I wouldn't bet on it ... too much personal responsibility for ya'll to handle right now.

    So instead of highlighting what a DEM mayor did for a southern city, why don't you wax poetically on how well the wingnut experiment in KS is going ?

    Funny how that doesn't make your echo chamber highlight list ....

    Here's a primer, feel free to 'extrapolate' how well it's working:

    In 2012, Kansas lawmakers passed a plan backed by Reagan economist Arthur Laffer that slashed income tax rates under the assumption that it would reduce state tax revenue yet substantially create jobs and boost the economy. But neither of those promises came to fruition.

    According to The New York Times, the state has seen modest job growth, but it has lagged behind the national average. Kansas brought in $282 million less in personal income tax revenue than it expected in fiscal 2014, or just 57 percent of what it had planned to collect. Moreover, the state's budget office projects slower growth in both personal income and gross domestic product. And in April, Moody’s Investors Services downgraded the state's credit, citing, in part, the revenue loss from the tax cut.

    The governor of the deep red state argued that low tax rates, which are scheduled to decrease further in 2018, would help attract new residents and businesses to the state and ultimately grow the tax base. He said that Kansans should vote for him come November because he'll double down on the tax plan -- a policy that analysts on the left and right consider the worst in the country.

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/07/09/kansas-sam-brownback_n_5570793.html?cps=gravity

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from high-road. Show high-road's posts

    Re: Houston's pro-growth policies have produced an urban powerhouse

    What's conspicuosly absent from the article is any actual policies that are responsible for this economic growth.

    The only examples are arbitrary references to jobs in the energy sector ... which is akin to a rooster taking credit for the sun rising every time he crows in the morning.

     

     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from ComingLiberalCrackup. Show ComingLiberalCrackup's posts

    Re: Houston's pro-growth policies have produced an urban powerhouse

    In response to high-road's comment:


    Try this again.


     


    And we in the Northeast can afford to take care of our own ... and still afford to pay for the nat'l welfare to subsidize all the slackers in the south/southwest and fly-over states. It will be a proud day indeed when ya'll can stop suckling at the teat of Uncle Sugar and actually attempt to survive on your own ... that may happen in my lifetime ... but I wouldn't bet on it ... too much personal responsibility for ya'll to handle right now.


    So instead of highlighting what a DEM mayor did for a southern city, why don't you wax poetically on how well the wingnut experiment in KS is going ?


    Funny how that doesn't make your echo chamber highlight list ....


    Here's a primer, feel free to 'extrapolate' how well it's working:


    In 2012, Kansas lawmakers passed a plan backed by Reagan economist Arthur Laffer that slashed income tax rates under the assumption that it would reduce state tax revenue yet substantially create jobs and boost the economy. But neither of those promises came to fruition.


    According to The New York Times, the state has seen modest job growth, but it has lagged behind the national average. Kansas brought in $282 million less in personal income tax revenue than it expected in fiscal 2014, or just 57 percent of what it had planned to collect. Moreover, the state's budget office projects slower growth in both personal income and gross domestic product. And in April, Moody’s Investors Services downgraded the state's credit, citing, in part, the revenue loss from the tax cut.


    The governor of the deep red state argued that low tax rates, which are scheduled to decrease further in 2018, would help attract new residents and businesses to the state and ultimately grow the tax base. He said that Kansans should vote for him come November because he'll double down on the tax plan -- a policy that analysts on the left and right consider the worst in the country.


    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/07/09/kansas-sam-brownback_n_5570793.html?cps=gravity" rel="nofollow">http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/07/09/kansas-sam-brownback_n_5570793.html?cps=gravity" rel="nofollow">http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/07/09/kansas-sam-brownback_n_5570793.html?cps=gravity



    Keep flogging that delusion about red state welfare moochers it keeps you warped worldview in synch...once you realize it is a myth, then your whole house of liberal cards falls down...
    Kansas has "modest" job growth?  Well, at least it isnt Rhode Island... I will take your Kansas and raise you Rhode Island, an economic basket case, due to failed liberal policies...


    City Journal:


    “Rhode Island is in the midst of an especially grim economic meltdown,” a 2009 New York Times story began, “and no one can pinpoint exactly why.” Five years later, the state continues to suffer from most of the same problems the Times story described: high unemployment, a crippling tax structure, dangerously underfunded state pension systems. But contrary to the Times’sclaims, Rhode Island’s predicament is easy to explain. With no special economic advantages, the state has maintained an entitlement mentality inherited from an age of colonial and industrial grandeur. Rhode Island was once one of America’s most prosperous states, and its rate of higher-education attainment remains better than the national average. But the state’s key industries collapsed long ago, and its political leadership has refused to make adjustments to its high-cost, high-regulation governance system.


    The result: a state with “the costs of Minnesota and the quality of Mississippi,” as Rob Atkinson, former executive director of the Rhode Island Economic Policy Council, told WPRI-TV. Indeed, Rhode Island is arguably America’s basket case, overlooked only because it is small enough to escape most national scrutiny. Its ruination is a striking corrective to the argument that states can tax, spend, and regulate their way to prosperity.


    Massachusetts  outside of the Boston area reflects this failure as well..Lowell, Springfield, Worcester, New Bedford.......economies doing poorly, high welfare, little private sector growth..

     
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