Kids Who Overcome Poverty Are Still In For A Lifetime Of Medical Problems

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from MattyScornD. Show MattyScornD's posts

    Kids Who Overcome Poverty Are Still In For A Lifetime Of Medical Problems

    Evidently, pulling yourself up by your own bootstraps isn’t enough to overcome a system that’s stacked against you.

    A new study by researchers at the University of Georgia finds that young teenagers from poor communities who are good students, in good mental health, and well-adjusted socially end up with high levels of stress hormones, high blood pressure, and a higher body mass index by age 19. In turn, that compromises their immune systems and puts them at greater risk for developing conditions such as obesity, cancer, hypertension, stroke, and cardiovascular disease at a young age.

    “Exposure to stress over time gets under the skin of children and adolescents, which makes them more vulnerable to disease later in life,” said lead researcher Gene Brody.

    Poverty and social exclusion are already major risk factors for a host of medical problems, including mental health disorders, diabetes, obesity, and heart disease. But the new research suggests that the stress of escaping poverty’s shackles causes long-term damage to young Americans’ health.

    “The children who are doing good at school, playing well with friends, have high self-esteem and don’t have behavior problems are often thought of as beating the odds or being resilient in the face of adversity. We hypothesized maybe at one level they are resilient, but looking at their biology and asking what is the cost, we find a physiologic toll to attaining behavior resilience,” said Brody.

    Brody recommends that young Americans address this issue by getting preventative health screenings, noting that “it is very important for them to be monitored and have yearly checkups” to find out if they are at risk for a chronic disease.

    Unfortunately, poor and isolated populations tend not to have access to quality health care. Poor communities have significantly lower numbers of hospitals that service them, and the financial burden of medical care prices many of the poor out of the system entirely.

    One way that state officials can ease these disparities is by expanding Medicaid under Obamacare. The health law also mandates that preventative services be provided for free, and expands funding for community health centers in an effort to bridge the coverage gap between the rich and the poor.

    But many Republican governors have been reticent to take part in the Medicaid expansion, meaning secluded and poor populations in their states won’t have the resources to manage chronic illnesses — even if they receive free screenings through a local clinic. Texas legislators voted to deny health coverage for 1.5 million low-income residents this past week, even though some low-income Texan families are so desperate for medical care that they’ve resorted to crossing the border into Mexico for services and sharing their insulin.

    This stubborn GOP opposition to Medicaid expansion is expected to widen existing health disparities, since states refusing to expand Medicaid have far more poor and uninsured residents and significantly worse health outcomes than pro-expansion states.

    As Ta-Nehisi Coates points out in a piece for The Atlantic, these disparities will disproportionately affect minority communities, many of which tend to have low incomes. “The black uninsured of Mississippi — a majority of the uninsured of the state — are not going to be evenly distributed among the various networks of the state. They are going to be concentrated in one particular network,” wrote Coates to illustrate his point.

    In turn, that will perpetuate the vicious cycle of poverty, poor health care, lost productivity, and unaffordable medical costs for racial and ethnic minorities. A study by the National Urban League Policy estimates that U.S. health care disparities have contributed to $59.9 billion in excess spending. And poor, private citizens are the ones who are forced to make up the difference, paying over 27 percent of those costs out of their own pockets — more than Medicare and Medicaid combined.

    And as the UGA study highlights, young Americans trying to claw their way out from the bottom could very well end up with a costly, chronic medical condition for their efforts. The road out of poverty is difficult enough as is — sadly, Americans who make the trek must pay a hefty toll.

     

     
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    Re: Kids Who Overcome Poverty Are Still In For A Lifetime Of Medical Problems

    Another inspirational message from progressives....It is too hard to escape poverty, so just give up and rely upon your Government.

    "Poverty and social exclusion are already major risk factors for a host of medical problems, including mental health disorders, diabetes, obesity, and heart disease. "

    Yes, but of course by far the major risk factor for health is personal behavior. Personal responsibility is a factor never emphasized by your Nanny State. Of course to Big Government you are merely a number, a statistic, defined by your income, race and dependency on government programs.

    Working hard is actually good for you, better than sitting on the couch. Dont smoke, dont eat too much and become obese, and the issue of whether your Nanny State takes over and ruins the best health care system in the world is less relevant. 

     

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hansoribrother. Show Hansoribrother's posts

    Re: Kids Who Overcome Poverty Are Still In For A Lifetime Of Medical Problems

    Being poor is stressful? Who would have known!?!

    There are lots of stressors in life and they are not all religated to the poor. The average diet of Americans which is loaded with animal protein, fat and sugar and this leaves everyone that lives on that diet with a compromised immune system.

    At some point people are responsible for dealing with their circumstances. If this problem of poverty and stress is a healthcare problem, do we not have Medicaid and now Obamcare to offer access to the healthcare system? 

    The State of Oregon recently had a lottery to determine who could receive benefits from an extension of their Medicaid program. 40% of the people that had taken the time to enter the lottery and were chosen did not even bother to apply for the benefits.

    At some point people have to take care of themselves, even if it is just to wake up and fill out a form for government benefits.

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from StalkingButler. Show StalkingButler's posts

    Re: Kids Who Overcome Poverty Are Still In For A Lifetime Of Medical Problems

    Matty, obviously, is using the fact that stress is harmful as just another apology for bad public policy (Obamacare.) Hans, you've nailed it when you say that people have to take care if themselves.

    The ironic part of Matty's screed is that even if Obamacare is implemented completely the problem that he describes will not be solved. The allopathic doctors that are in this system do not have the knowledge or training necessary to prevent the problems that accrue from chronic stress, they only know how to prescribe a pill that only helps to mask the symptoms. The pills then have their own side effects leading to a situation where the patients health is moved into a permanent downward spiral.

    The answer is to take charge of your own health, learn about nutrition, supplements, stress reducing practices such as meditation and so on. Then go to an allopathic doctor when you have a broken bone, that's what they're good at.

     

    -

    Never underestimate the power of stupid people in large groups.

     

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from MattyScornD. Show MattyScornD's posts

    Re: Kids Who Overcome Poverty Are Still In For A Lifetime Of Medical Problems

    "$59.9 billion in excess [healthcare] spending"

    This one stat means that we're paying too much money for not enough care.  And in a profit-driven system, it's the poor who are left to fend for themselves with pitiful results.

    Per some opinions here, poor children are likewise remanded to the "personal responsibility" bucket.  Because it's all their fault they were born into poverty; so f**k 'em, right?  Let them suffer so the rest of us can prosper instead.

     

     

    "When you're born, you get a ticket to the freak show. When you're born in America, you get a front-row seat."  - GC

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from FortySixAndTwo. Show FortySixAndTwo's posts

    Re: Kids Who Overcome Poverty Are Still In For A Lifetime Of Medical Problems

    In response to MattyScornD's comment:

    "$59.9 billion in excess [healthcare] spending"

    This one stat means that we're paying too much money for not enough care.  And in a profit-driven system, it's the poor who are left to fend for themselves with pitiful results.

    Per some opinions here, poor children are likewise remanded to the "personal responsibility" bucket.  Because it's all their fault they were born into poverty; so f**k 'em, right?  Let them suffer so the rest of us can prosper instead.

     

     

    "When you're born, you get a ticket to the freak show. When you're born in America, you get a front-row seat."  - GC



    The personal responsibilty would be on the parents of these kids. 

    Oh and be careful...your above response appears to be a bit snarky. I say that because you don't like it when it's done to you. just sayin... ; )

     
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    Re: Kids Who Overcome Poverty Are Still In For A Lifetime Of Medical Problems

    In response to FortySixAndTwo's comment:

    In response to MattyScornD's comment:

    [QUOTE]

     

    "$59.9 billion in excess [healthcare] spending"

    This one stat means that we're paying too much money for not enough care.  And in a profit-driven system, it's the poor who are left to fend for themselves with pitiful results.

    Per some opinions here, poor children are likewise remanded to the "personal responsibility" bucket.  Because it's all their fault they were born into poverty; so f**k 'em, right?  Let them suffer so the rest of us can prosper instead.

     

     

    "When you're born, you get a ticket to the freak show. When you're born in America, you get a front-row seat."  - GC

     



     

    The personal responsibilty would be on the parents of these kids. 

     

    [/QUOTE]


    And yet, the kids still bear the effects - and the blame - for many years afterward through no fault of their own.

    If that's true, the only real way to help the kids is by helping the parents be responsible.

     

     

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from FortySixAndTwo. Show FortySixAndTwo's posts

    Re: Kids Who Overcome Poverty Are Still In For A Lifetime Of Medical Problems

    In response to MattyScornD's comment:

    In response to FortySixAndTwo's comment:

    [QUOTE]

     

    In response to MattyScornD's comment:

     

    [QUOTE]

     

     

    "$59.9 billion in excess [healthcare] spending"

    This one stat means that we're paying too much money for not enough care.  And in a profit-driven system, it's the poor who are left to fend for themselves with pitiful results.

    Per some opinions here, poor children are likewise remanded to the "personal responsibility" bucket.  Because it's all their fault they were born into poverty; so f**k 'em, right?  Let them suffer so the rest of us can prosper instead.

     

     

    "When you're born, you get a ticket to the freak show. When you're born in America, you get a front-row seat."  - GC

     

     



     

     

    The personal responsibilty would be on the parents of these kids. 

     

     

    [/QUOTE]


     

    And yet, the kids still bear the effects - and the blame - for many years afterward through no fault of their own.

    If that's true, the only real way to help the kids is by helping the parents be responsible.

     

     

    [/QUOTE]

    Who blames kids for their parents not being responsible???

     

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from MattyScornD. Show MattyScornD's posts

    Re: Kids Who Overcome Poverty Are Still In For A Lifetime Of Medical Problems

    In response to FortySixAndTwo's comment:

    In response to MattyScornD's comment:

    [QUOTE]

     

    In response to FortySixAndTwo's comment:

     

    [QUOTE]

     

     

    In response to MattyScornD's comment:

     

     

    [QUOTE]

     

     

     

    "$59.9 billion in excess [healthcare] spending"

    This one stat means that we're paying too much money for not enough care.  And in a profit-driven system, it's the poor who are left to fend for themselves with pitiful results.

    Per some opinions here, poor children are likewise remanded to the "personal responsibility" bucket.  Because it's all their fault they were born into poverty; so f**k 'em, right?  Let them suffer so the rest of us can prosper instead.

     

     

    "When you're born, you get a ticket to the freak show. When you're born in America, you get a front-row seat."  - GC

     

     

     



     

     

     

    The personal responsibilty would be on the parents of these kids. 

     

     

     

    [/QUOTE]


     

     

    And yet, the kids still bear the effects - and the blame - for many years afterward through no fault of their own.

    If that's true, the only real way to help the kids is by helping the parents be responsible.

     

     

     

    [/QUOTE]

    Who blames kids for their parents not being responsible???

     

     

    [/QUOTE]

    We do.

    The sins of the parents are laid at the feet of their children...whether it's through education, healthcare, immigration or any manner of "bootstrap" myth-influenced policy.  Some do manage to break through and overcome the circumstances of their birth, but they are the lucky ones and proportionally few in number.

     

     

     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hansoribrother. Show Hansoribrother's posts

    Re: Kids Who Overcome Poverty Are Still In For A Lifetime Of Medical Problems

    In response to MattyScornD's comment:

    "$59.9 billion in excess [healthcare] spending"

    This one stat means that we're paying too much money for not enough care.  And in a profit-driven system, it's the poor who are left to fend for themselves with pitiful results.

    Per some opinions here, poor children are likewise remanded to the "personal responsibility" bucket.  Because it's all their fault they were born into poverty; so f**k 'em, right?  Let them suffer so the rest of us can prosper instead.

     

     

    "When you're born, you get a ticket to the freak show. When you're born in America, you get a front-row seat."  - GC



    It's for the children again?

    Perhaps you forgot.....

    We have Medicaid.

    We have Obamacare (which is quickly becoming a flustercuck)

    We have other benefits (Food Stamps, sections 8, AFDC, etc. etc)

    Is this relegating children to the "personal responsibility bucket"? If so these programs are a complete failure and should be shut down and totally revamped.

    We have bigger problems than worrying about self-sufficient adults having stress/healthcare problems because of the stress of poverty.

    There are limits to what can be done for people if they are not willing to participate. DO you see that being the case for anyone???

     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from FortySixAndTwo. Show FortySixAndTwo's posts

    Re: Kids Who Overcome Poverty Are Still In For A Lifetime Of Medical Problems

    In response to MattyScornD's comment:

    In response to FortySixAndTwo's comment:

    [QUOTE]

     

    In response to MattyScornD's comment:

     

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    In response to FortySixAndTwo's comment:

     

     

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    In response to MattyScornD's comment:

     

     

     

    [QUOTE]

     

     

     

     

    "$59.9 billion in excess [healthcare] spending"

    This one stat means that we're paying too much money for not enough care.  And in a profit-driven system, it's the poor who are left to fend for themselves with pitiful results.

    Per some opinions here, poor children are likewise remanded to the "personal responsibility" bucket.  Because it's all their fault they were born into poverty; so f**k 'em, right?  Let them suffer so the rest of us can prosper instead.

     

     

    "When you're born, you get a ticket to the freak show. When you're born in America, you get a front-row seat."  - GC

     

     

     

     



     

     

     

     

    The personal responsibilty would be on the parents of these kids. 

     

     

     

     

    [/QUOTE]


     

     

     

    And yet, the kids still bear the effects - and the blame - for many years afterward through no fault of their own.

    If that's true, the only real way to help the kids is by helping the parents be responsible.

     

     

     

     

    [/QUOTE]

    Who blames kids for their parents not being responsible???

     

     

     

     

    [/QUOTE]

    We do.

     

    The sins of the parents are laid at the feet of their children...whether it's through education, healthcare, immigration or any manner of "bootstrap" myth-influenced policy.  Some do manage to break through and overcome the circumstances of their birth, but they are the lucky ones and proportionally few in number.

     

     

    [/QUOTE]

    I don't blame kids for a damn thing. When they become adults is when responsibility is on them and THAT is when I will hold them accountable. But a child? No....that's on the parents

     

     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from MattyScornD. Show MattyScornD's posts

    Re: Kids Who Overcome Poverty Are Still In For A Lifetime Of Medical Problems

    In response to Hansoribrother's comment:

    In response to MattyScornD's comment:

    [QUOTE]

     

    "$59.9 billion in excess [healthcare] spending"

    This one stat means that we're paying too much money for not enough care.  And in a profit-driven system, it's the poor who are left to fend for themselves with pitiful results.

    Per some opinions here, poor children are likewise remanded to the "personal responsibility" bucket.  Because it's all their fault they were born into poverty; so f**k 'em, right?  Let them suffer so the rest of us can prosper instead.

     

     

    "When you're born, you get a ticket to the freak show. When you're born in America, you get a front-row seat."  - GC

     



    It's for the children again?

     

    Perhaps you forgot.....

    We have Medicaid.

    We have Obamacare (which is quickly becoming a flustercuck)

    We have other benefits (Food Stamps, sections 8, AFDC, etc. etc)

    Is this relegating children to the "personal responsibility bucket"? If so these programs are a complete failure and should be shut down and totally revamped.

    We have bigger problems than worrying about self-sufficient adults having stress/healthcare problems because of the stress of poverty.

    There are limits to what can be done for people if they are not willing to participate. DO you see that being the case for anyone???

    [/QUOTE]

    I didn't forget.  In fact, it's precisely the point: it's not enough.

    And even if it were, some priorities are likewise misplaced.  What good is telling someone to work hard where there are no jobs?  What good is the emphasis on parenting when we jail their fathers for petty drug offenses, deny their mothers efficient healthcare or deport them for (petty) immigration violations?

    Either your denying poverty or denying the effects of it.  I can't decide which view is more myopic.

     

     

     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from MattyScornD. Show MattyScornD's posts

    Re: Kids Who Overcome Poverty Are Still In For A Lifetime Of Medical Problems

    In response to FortySixAndTwo's comment:

    In response to MattyScornD's comment:

    [QUOTE]

     

    In response to FortySixAndTwo's comment:

     

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    In response to MattyScornD's comment:

     

     

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    In response to FortySixAndTwo's comment:

     

     

     

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    In response to MattyScornD's comment:

     

     

     

     

    [QUOTE]

     

     

     

     

     

    "$59.9 billion in excess [healthcare] spending"

    This one stat means that we're paying too much money for not enough care.  And in a profit-driven system, it's the poor who are left to fend for themselves with pitiful results.

    Per some opinions here, poor children are likewise remanded to the "personal responsibility" bucket.  Because it's all their fault they were born into poverty; so f**k 'em, right?  Let them suffer so the rest of us can prosper instead.

     

     

    "When you're born, you get a ticket to the freak show. When you're born in America, you get a front-row seat."  - GC

     

     

     

     

     



     

     

     

     

     

    The personal responsibilty would be on the parents of these kids. 

     

     

     

     

     

    [/QUOTE]


     

     

     

     

    And yet, the kids still bear the effects - and the blame - for many years afterward through no fault of their own.

    If that's true, the only real way to help the kids is by helping the parents be responsible.

     

     

     

     

     

    [/QUOTE]

    Who blames kids for their parents not being responsible???

     

     

     

     

     

     

    [/QUOTE]

    We do.

     

     

    The sins of the parents are laid at the feet of their children...whether it's through education, healthcare, immigration or any manner of "bootstrap" myth-influenced policy.  Some do manage to break through and overcome the circumstances of their birth, but they are the lucky ones and proportionally few in number.

     

     

     

    [/QUOTE]

    I don't blame kids for a damn thing. When they become adults is when responsibility is on them and THAT is when I will hold them accountable. But a child? No....that's on the parents

     

     

    [/QUOTE]

    Not explicitly.  But the kids still bear the derision through policies which either don't help or make matters worse.  The problems are more systemic than your personal ethics would imply.

     

     

     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from FortySixAndTwo. Show FortySixAndTwo's posts

    Re: Kids Who Overcome Poverty Are Still In For A Lifetime Of Medical Problems

    In response to MattyScornD's comment:

    In response to FortySixAndTwo's comment:

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    In response to MattyScornD's comment:

     

     

     

     

     

    [QUOTE]

     

     

     

     

     

     

    "$59.9 billion in excess [healthcare] spending"

    This one stat means that we're paying too much money for not enough care.  And in a profit-driven system, it's the poor who are left to fend for themselves with pitiful results.

    Per some opinions here, poor children are likewise remanded to the "personal responsibility" bucket.  Because it's all their fault they were born into poverty; so f**k 'em, right?  Let them suffer so the rest of us can prosper instead.

     

     

    "When you're born, you get a ticket to the freak show. When you're born in America, you get a front-row seat."  - GC

     

     

     

     

     

     



     

     

     

     

     

     

    The personal responsibilty would be on the parents of these kids. 

     

     

     

     

     

     

    [/QUOTE]


     

     

     

     

     

    And yet, the kids still bear the effects - and the blame - for many years afterward through no fault of their own.

    If that's true, the only real way to help the kids is by helping the parents be responsible.

     

     

     

     

     

     

    [/QUOTE]

    Who blames kids for their parents not being responsible???

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    [/QUOTE]

    We do.

     

     

     

    The sins of the parents are laid at the feet of their children...whether it's through education, healthcare, immigration or any manner of "bootstrap" myth-influenced policy.  Some do manage to break through and overcome the circumstances of their birth, but they are the lucky ones and proportionally few in number.

     

     

     

     

    [/QUOTE]

    I don't blame kids for a damn thing. When they become adults is when responsibility is on them and THAT is when I will hold them accountable. But a child? No....that's on the parents

     

     

     

     

    [/QUOTE]

    Not explicitly.  But the kids still bear the derision through policies which either don't help or make matters worse.  The problems are more systemic than your personal ethics would imply.

     

     

     

    [/QUOTE]

    Or derision through the fault of their parents. Which still isn't fair. 

    So per your statement current policies either don't help or make matters worse. Well, what do you propose WOULD help? 

     

     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from MattyScornD. Show MattyScornD's posts

    Re: Kids Who Overcome Poverty Are Still In For A Lifetime Of Medical Problems

    In response to FortySixAndTwo's comment:

    In response to MattyScornD's comment:

    [QUOTE]

    In response to FortySixAndTwo's comment:

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    In response to MattyScornD's comment:

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    In response to FortySixAndTwo's comment:

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    In response to MattyScornD's comment:

    [QUOTE]

    In response to FortySixAndTwo's comment:

    [QUOTE]

    In response to MattyScornD's comment:

    [QUOTE]

    "$59.9 billion in excess [healthcare] spending"

    This one stat means that we're paying too much money for not enough care.  And in a profit-driven system, it's the poor who are left to fend for themselves with pitiful results.

    Per some opinions here, poor children are likewise remanded to the "personal responsibility" bucket.  Because it's all their fault they were born into poverty; so f**k 'em, right?  Let them suffer so the rest of us can prosper instead.

     

    "When you're born, you get a ticket to the freak show. When you're born in America, you get a front-row seat."  - GC

    The personal responsibilty would be on the parents of these kids. 

    [/QUOTE]

    And yet, the kids still bear the effects - and the blame - for many years afterward through no fault of their own.

    If that's true, the only real way to help the kids is by helping the parents be responsible.

    [/QUOTE]

    Who blames kids for their parents not being responsible???

    [/QUOTE]


    We do.

     

    The sins of the parents are laid at the feet of their children...whether it's through education, healthcare, immigration or any manner of "bootstrap" myth-influenced policy.  Some do manage to break through and overcome the circumstances of their birth, but they are the lucky ones and proportionally few in number.

    [/QUOTE]


    I don't blame kids for a damn thing. When they become adults is when responsibility is on them and THAT is when I will hold them accountable. But a child? No....that's on the parents

    [/QUOTE]


    Not explicitly.  But the kids still bear the derision through policies which either don't help or make matters worse.  The problems are more systemic than your personal ethics would imply.

    [/QUOTE]


    Or derision through the fault of their parents. Which still isn't fair. 

    So per your statement current policies either don't help or make matters worse. Well, what do you propose WOULD help? 

     

    [/QUOTE]


    Some current policies work; others don't.

    Healthcare is a big one.  The current system/model is unequitable - benefitting the poor least of all. For all of the ACA's warts, this is the area in which it is critical, by trying to 'level the playing field'.  Only by expanding the model to cover these patients can we rein in the care deficit and get people (and children) healthier.  Already, it's starting to work.

    (It's not about spending more, either; it's about getting more value for the money.)

     

     

     

     

     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from FortySixAndTwo. Show FortySixAndTwo's posts

    Re: Kids Who Overcome Poverty Are Still In For A Lifetime Of Medical Problems

    In response to MattyScornD's comment:

    In response to FortySixAndTwo's comment:

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    In response to MattyScornD's comment:

     

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    In response to MattyScornD's comment:

     

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    In response to FortySixAndTwo's comment:

     

    [QUOTE]

     

    In response to MattyScornD's comment:

     

    [QUOTE]

     

    "$59.9 billion in excess [healthcare] spending"

    This one stat means that we're paying too much money for not enough care.  And in a profit-driven system, it's the poor who are left to fend for themselves with pitiful results.

    Per some opinions here, poor children are likewise remanded to the "personal responsibility" bucket.  Because it's all their fault they were born into poverty; so f**k 'em, right?  Let them suffer so the rest of us can prosper instead.

     

    "When you're born, you get a ticket to the freak show. When you're born in America, you get a front-row seat."  - GC

     

     

    The personal responsibilty would be on the parents of these kids. 

     

    [/QUOTE]

     

    And yet, the kids still bear the effects - and the blame - for many years afterward through no fault of their own.

    If that's true, the only real way to help the kids is by helping the parents be responsible.

     

    [/QUOTE]

     

    Who blames kids for their parents not being responsible???

     

    [/QUOTE]

     


    We do.

     

    The sins of the parents are laid at the feet of their children...whether it's through education, healthcare, immigration or any manner of "bootstrap" myth-influenced policy.  Some do manage to break through and overcome the circumstances of their birth, but they are the lucky ones and proportionally few in number.

     

    [/QUOTE]

     


    I don't blame kids for a damn thing. When they become adults is when responsibility is on them and THAT is when I will hold them accountable. But a child? No....that's on the parents

     

    [/QUOTE]

     


    Not explicitly.  But the kids still bear the derision through policies which either don't help or make matters worse.  The problems are more systemic than your personal ethics would imply.

     

    [/QUOTE]

     


    Or derision through the fault of their parents. Which still isn't fair. 

    So per your statement current policies either don't help or make matters worse. Well, what do you propose WOULD help? 

     

     

    [/QUOTE]


     

    Some current policies work; others don't.

    Healthcare is a big one.  The current system/model is unequitable - benefitting the poor least of all. For all of the ACA's warts, this is the area in which it is critical, by trying to 'level the playing field'.  Only by expanding the model to cover these patients can we rein in the care deficit and get people (and children) healthier.  Already, it's starting to work.

    (It's not about spending more, either; it's about getting more value for the money.)

     

     

     

     

    [/QUOTE]

    Only by expanding the model to cover these patients can we rein in the care deficit and get people (and children) healthier.  Already, it's starting to work.

     

    Starting to work how? In what way specifically have you seen it get people healthier? 

     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from MattyScornD. Show MattyScornD's posts

    Re: Kids Who Overcome Poverty Are Still In For A Lifetime Of Medical Problems

    In response to FortySixAndTwo's comment:

    In response to MattyScornD's comment:

    [QUOTE]

     

    In response to FortySixAndTwo's comment:

     

    [QUOTE]

     

     

    In response to MattyScornD's comment:

     

     

    [QUOTE]

     

     

    In response to FortySixAndTwo's comment:

     

     

    [QUOTE]

     

     

    In response to MattyScornD's comment:

     

     

    [QUOTE]

     

     

    In response to FortySixAndTwo's comment:

     

     

    [QUOTE]

     

     

    In response to MattyScornD's comment:

     

     

    [QUOTE]

     

     

    In response to FortySixAndTwo's comment:

     

     

    [QUOTE]

     

     

    In response to MattyScornD's comment:

     

     

    [QUOTE]

     

     

    "$59.9 billion in excess [healthcare] spending"

    This one stat means that we're paying too much money for not enough care.  And in a profit-driven system, it's the poor who are left to fend for themselves with pitiful results.

    Per some opinions here, poor children are likewise remanded to the "personal responsibility" bucket.  Because it's all their fault they were born into poverty; so f**k 'em, right?  Let them suffer so the rest of us can prosper instead.

     

    "When you're born, you get a ticket to the freak show. When you're born in America, you get a front-row seat."  - GC

     

     

     

     

    The personal responsibilty would be on the parents of these kids. 

     

     

    [/QUOTE]

     

     

    And yet, the kids still bear the effects - and the blame - for many years afterward through no fault of their own.

    If that's true, the only real way to help the kids is by helping the parents be responsible.

     

     

    [/QUOTE]

     

     

    Who blames kids for their parents not being responsible???

     

     

    [/QUOTE]

     

     


    We do.

     

    The sins of the parents are laid at the feet of their children...whether it's through education, healthcare, immigration or any manner of "bootstrap" myth-influenced policy.  Some do manage to break through and overcome the circumstances of their birth, but they are the lucky ones and proportionally few in number.

     

     

    [/QUOTE]

     

     


    I don't blame kids for a damn thing. When they become adults is when responsibility is on them and THAT is when I will hold them accountable. But a child? No....that's on the parents

     

     

    [/QUOTE]

     

     


    Not explicitly.  But the kids still bear the derision through policies which either don't help or make matters worse.  The problems are more systemic than your personal ethics would imply.

     

     

    [/QUOTE]

     

     


    Or derision through the fault of their parents. Which still isn't fair. 

    So per your statement current policies either don't help or make matters worse. Well, what do you propose WOULD help? 

     

     

     

    [/QUOTE]


     

     

    Some current policies work; others don't.

    Healthcare is a big one.  The current system/model is unequitable - benefitting the poor least of all. For all of the ACA's warts, this is the area in which it is critical, by trying to 'level the playing field'.  Only by expanding the model to cover these patients can we rein in the care deficit and get people (and children) healthier.  Already, it's starting to work.

    (It's not about spending more, either; it's about getting more value for the money.)

     

     

     

     

     

    [/QUOTE]

    Only by expanding the model to cover these patients can we rein in the care deficit and get people (and children) healthier.  Already, it's starting to work.

     

     

    Starting to work how? In what way specifically have you seen it get people healthier? 

    [/QUOTE]

    For one, by covering pre-existing conditions, care exists now whereas before it was denied. For another, by having kids covered up until age 26 on their parents' plan.  Expansion of medicaid will also expand the pool.  Thousands of people are being reported as seeing a doctor for the first time in years due to finally having coverage.  A simple exam/diagnosis/treatment plan is the first step to better health.

     

     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hansoribrother. Show Hansoribrother's posts

    Re: Kids Who Overcome Poverty Are Still In For A Lifetime Of Medical Problems

    In response to MattyScornD's comment:

    In response to Hansoribrother's comment:

    [QUOTE]

     

    In response to MattyScornD's comment:

     

    [QUOTE]

     

     

    "$59.9 billion in excess [healthcare] spending"

    This one stat means that we're paying too much money for not enough care.  And in a profit-driven system, it's the poor who are left to fend for themselves with pitiful results.

    Per some opinions here, poor children are likewise remanded to the "personal responsibility" bucket.  Because it's all their fault they were born into poverty; so f**k 'em, right?  Let them suffer so the rest of us can prosper instead.

     

     

    "When you're born, you get a ticket to the freak show. When you're born in America, you get a front-row seat."  - GC

     

     



    It's for the children again?

     

     

    Perhaps you forgot.....

    We have Medicaid.

    We have Obamacare (which is quickly becoming a flustercuck)

    We have other benefits (Food Stamps, sections 8, AFDC, etc. etc)

    Is this relegating children to the "personal responsibility bucket"? If so these programs are a complete failure and should be shut down and totally revamped.

    We have bigger problems than worrying about self-sufficient adults having stress/healthcare problems because of the stress of poverty.

    There are limits to what can be done for people if they are not willing to participate. DO you see that being the case for anyone???

     

    [/QUOTE]

    I didn't forget.  In fact, it's precisely the point: it's not enough.

     

    And even if it were, some priorities are likewise misplaced.  What good is telling someone to work hard where there are no jobs?  What good is the emphasis on parenting when we jail their fathers for petty drug offenses, deny their mothers efficient healthcare or deport them for (petty) immigration violations?

    Either your denying poverty or denying the effects of it.  I can't decide which view is more myopic.

     

     

    [/QUOTE]

    I do not deny poverty, I am just saying that because one might expect some level of individual responsibilty from people doesn't mean that they deny poverty exists. 

    The money that people can make on benefits gets to the point where it is better for them to stay on benefits rather than get a job. The problem with the programs is not that they do not have enough money. They do not work. They remove incentives for self-sufficiency and work.

    Your level of expectations for these people is rather low.

    If you had children, would you expect this little from them? What do you think would happen if you paid for college and they came home and you paid for their housing, food, a car, gas, let their girlfirend/boy friend move in, have a child and give them a good allowance for it, buy food for them and thier families etc. 

    Is that what you would want for your children? Why do you expect so little from others?  

    If you want to learn something about how the labor market is impacted by government programs, go here:

     

    http://home.uchicago.edu/~cbm4/

     
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  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from FortySixAndTwo. Show FortySixAndTwo's posts

    Re: Kids Who Overcome Poverty Are Still In For A Lifetime Of Medical Problems

    In response to MattyScornD's comment:

     

    Starting to work how? In what way specifically have you seen it get people healthier? 

     

     



    For one, by covering pre-existing conditions, care exists now whereas before it was denied

     

    Not necessarily. Many had coverage but couldn't go to another job where they had to choose a different plan. So while they were covered, they didn't have the freedom to change jobs.

     

    For another, by having kids covered up until age 26 on their parents' plan.  

    That doesn't mean they'll automatically be healthier. Just because one has coverage doesn't make one healthy. Countless examples of people with great coverage who either don't use it because they're too macho to go to doctor, until it's too late. Or there's those who do go but ignore their doctors pleas to quit smoking, exercise, eat right, etc.

     

    Expansion of medicaid will also expand the pool.  Thousands of people are being reported as seeing a doctor for the first time in years due to finally having coverage.  A simple exam/diagnosis/treatment plan is the first step to better health.

    Again, not always. 

     

     




     

     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from MattyScornD. Show MattyScornD's posts

    Re: Kids Who Overcome Poverty Are Still In For A Lifetime Of Medical Problems

    In response to GreginMeffa's comment:



    Well said sir.  My kids grew up through the era when EVERY kid had ADHD and needed Ritalin on the long term (translation: Forever).  And here we are where if dad's outta work and your gonna have to ride your big brother's old bike for a year, you have PTSD and need treatment.  Guess what treatment means.

     

    Drugs

    [/QUOTE]

    So, what's your point?  That kids need coverage for drug treatment, or they don't?

     

     
  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from FortySixAndTwo. Show FortySixAndTwo's posts

    Re: Kids Who Overcome Poverty Are Still In For A Lifetime Of Medical Problems

    In response to GreginMeffa's comment:

    here we are where if dad's outta work and your gonna have to ride your big brother's old bike for a year, you have PTSD

     

    Exaggerate much?

     

    In response to WhatDoYouWantNow's comment:

    I don't know. He might have caught socialist muslim terrist cooties after Obama's latest visit.

    Exaggerate much?

     

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