More of this on the horizon..

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from Ohhhhh-Bammy. Show Ohhhhh-Bammy's posts

    More of this on the horizon..


    Tip o the iceberg.. As we pull out.. the sophisticated Iraqis will 'thin the herd'.

    What will the Big-O do as violence increases daily? Stay tuned.

     

    BAGHDAD —  Bombings and shootings killed at least 33 people in Baghdad and surrounding areas on Monday, including a group of high school students on a bus headed for final exams, as violence intensified before a planned withdrawal next week of U.S. troops from urban areas.

    The bombings, nearly all in Shiite areas of the capital, came just two days after the year's deadliest attack — a truck bombing that killed at least 75 people in northern Iraq.

    Overall violence has declined drastically over the past two years, but the recent attacks have raised concerns about the Shiite-dominated government's ability to provide security around the country without the immediate help of the U.S. troops remaining in Iraq. More than 100 people have died in three days of bloodletting, mostly from bombings but also from shootings.

    Starting June 30, most of the 133,000 American troops left here will be housed in large bases outside the capital and other cities — unable to react unless called on for help. The withdrawal is part of an agreement under which all U.S. troops are to leave Iraq by the end of 2011.

    The reclusive Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr called on the Shiite-led government to take whatever steps necessary to protect Iraqis from attacks. But in a statement, the anti-American cleric blamed the violence on the continued presence of U.S. troops in the country and demanded a faster withdrawal.

    "The Iraqi people are heading toward a new phase that might lift them out from their suffering," the cleric said in a statement. He also called on his followers to remain peaceful.

    Last August, he ordered militiamen of his Mahdi Army to lay down their arms and take up social work. The edict came just after U.S. troops working with Iraqi soldiers routed the militia in its stronghold in Baghdad's Sadr City.

    In that Shiite bastion, a roadside bomb exploded next to a bus carrying high school students to their final exams on Monday, killing at least three people and wounding 13, including three of the students, police said. The bomb peppered the bus with shrapnel and left the floor of the vehicle littered with blood-soaked textbooks.

    The U.S. military said only one civilian was killed and eight wounded. Conflicting casualty tolls are common in the aftermath of bombings in Iraq as victims are often taken to multiple hospitals.

    At least five people also were killed and 20 were wounded by a bomb planted near a car in the central Karradah district of the Iraqi capital, on the east side of the Tigris River. The bomb exploded on a road leading to a checkpoint that controls access to a bridge into the Green Zone, which houses the Iraqi government and U.S. Embassy.

    The U.S. military put the casualty toll at two killed and six wounded.

    Another roadside bomb targeted a police patrol in a commercial area of eastern Baghdad's Ur district, killing three and wounding 25, according to police, although the U.S. military said just two were killed.

    A suicide car bomber then targeted the mayor's offices in Abu Ghraib, a predominantly Sunni district west of Baghdad.

    The explosion occurred when the car struck a civilian vehicle before reaching the government building, damaging a nearby U.S. vehicle that was providing security for a meeting, said Maj. David Shoupe, a spokesman for U.S. forces in Baghdad.

    He said four civilians were killed and 10 people were wounded, including three U.S. soldiers, while a local police officer said seven civilians were killed and 13 wounded.

    North of the capital, a roadside bomb struck an Iraqi army patrol, killing three Iraqi soldiers near Khanaqin, near the Iranian border, according to the security headquarters in Diyala province.

    And north of Baghdad, a parked motorcycle loaded with explosives blew up in an open-air public market in the predominantly Shiite area of in Husseiniya, killing five people and wounding another 22, police and hospital officials said.

    Gunmen also killed at least seven people in separate attacks in the northern city of Mosul, including a woman and four Iraqi security forces, according to separate police reports.

    The Iraqi officials all spoke on condition of anonymity because they weren't authorized to release the information.

    In northern Iraq, rescue crews were searching for at least 12 people still missing in a massive explosion Saturday near the ethnically tense city of Kirkuk that flattened a Shiite mosque and dozens of mud-brick houses around it.

    Iraqi police have blamed Al Qaeda in Iraq for the attack, saying it was part of an insurgent campaign to destabilize the country and undermine confidence in the government.

    Americans will remain ready to help, as they were in the aftermath of Saturday's bombing, but many Iraqis fear their departure after two years of a steady urban presence will prove deadly




     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from Xaphius. Show Xaphius's posts

    Re: More of this on the horizon..

    Short Answer?

    Stay. 

    Although, I'm sure that by now, 'they' were hoping to have the situation under better control, and not have so many troops dedicated to the one theatre.... methinks it has proven harder for them to advance on "The Grand Chessboard" than they once figured.



    Cheney wasn't lying when he said this war could last 100 years.  It is the end of the age of oil, and I fear, the beginning of a dark era or resource wars, and dramatic shifts in world power....
     
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  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from rudickinme. Show rudickinme's posts

    Re: More of this on the horizon..

    [QUOTE]Short Answer? Stay.  Although, I'm sure that by now, 'they' were hoping to have the situation under better control, and not have so many troops dedicated to the one theatre.... methinks it has proven harder for them to advance on "The Grand Chessboard" than they once figured. Cheney wasn't lying when he said this war could last 100 years.  It is the end of the age of oil, and I fear, the beginning of a dark era or resource wars, and dramatic shifts in world power....
    Posted by Xaphius[/QUOTE]

    I agree.. we have a moral obligation to stay but Obama will treat this like Gitmo where he will bail.. because he said so.. even though it defies all logic and many will die.
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from Xaphius. Show Xaphius's posts

    Re: More of this on the horizon..

    [QUOTE]I fear you are right about resource wars. I had hoped that Obama's stimulus package would help. Unfortunately it was woefully short in money for alternative energy and money to expand existing supplies of domestic oil. Also, the rapid decline in price of oil and natural gas has cause alot of companies to cut back and turn off alot of oil and gas wells etc. I am sure the global warming freaks are happy,but I fear as you that conflicts are coming over this. One of the reasons a strong military presence is helpful is to protect these supplies. Cutting back on defense will have its price in lost energy resources. When you cut back on military you have fewer options open to you in responding to threats. And when we get threatened we will have to use more significant force. That is if we decide to respond.
    Posted by Newtster[/QUOTE]


    Oil....water....food..... there simply won't be enough to go around.  I've attended statistical seminars (back in the day), where presentations were done on resources and population.....we are pretty much NOW at a tipping point in terms of oil, food, water, and the carrying capacity of the earth.

    Some people will cry, "Malthusian!".  Others, will reach for the quote about available resources always being a function of available technology....

    But I don't think we're going to wind up 'fooling mother nature' when it comes to a simple idea like, certain critical resources being ultimately finite.  Rates of technological innovation don't appear fast enough to replace hydrocarbons with anything that can remotely fill its shoes. 

    Somehow, someway, the population of the earth has to stop growing.

    It is my belief, as it can be traced in various documents going back for decades (a particular paper by Kissenger comes to mind), that America's foreign policy strategy is really nothing but a new manifestation of the age old reach for resources...(the same reason for most human behaviors, when you get down to it)..only this time, the 'endgame' also must include population control / reduction

    There is no real agreement amongst 'the elite' insofar as how to actually achieve this.  But rest assured, "all options are on the table", as goes the cliche.


    I'm personally doubtful that the US alone is going to be able to keep a hold over the Middle East -  anything like what we had in the past half century or so.  War will spread there.  The oil demands it. 

    Maybe one aim of the 'global government' efforts, is to oversee a somewhat orderly management of resources / reduction of population (of course, making sure that certain people and places get a more than equal share).   They seem to prefer a proactive appraoch - something like a controlled burn - as opposed to just letting chaos unfold, and stand redy to react.  Besides - we have too many goals in too many places to just stand back and NOT use our giant military.  It's kinda the whole reason we have it.


    Not that I'm excusing anything, but this is jsut what I see.





     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from Pymus. Show Pymus's posts

    Re: More of this on the horizon..

    After all - With Obama's family history and roots - Im sure he is much more comfortable negotiating by bowing to pygmies with beards and robes who rule with a religious iron fist than fighting for young upstarts with a cause.


    But then again all of you who voted for Obama knew this right? I mean you payed attention to the facts right? You took into consideration the company that Barak Obama kept (Rev. Wright) throughout his rise in government right?

     

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