Part 2: the hubris of progressives

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from ronreganfan. Show ronreganfan's posts

    Part 2: the hubris of progressives

     


    My my favorite part:


    "Unlike its physical counterpart, intellectual capital isn't forged by markets' relentless drive for higher quality and innovation. Instead, we've largely left it to public schools.


    They are creatures of government — a bureaucratic process that's resistant to change, indifferent to student needs and mired in mediocrity. What's worse, money flows toward underperforming schools, so the system rewards failure, not success.
    The results are predictable: America's public schools are failing to deliver quality education to most of the nation's students."



    Read More At Investor's Business Daily: http://news.investors.com/ibd-editorials-brain-trust/071414-708639-to-shrink-the-income-gap-our-failed-education-system-must-be-privatized.htm#ixzz37XMrQvvc
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  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from DirtyWaterLover. Show DirtyWaterLover's posts

    Re: Part 2: the hubris of progressives

    I always thought "intellectual capital" was forged at universities - private and public.  Maybe the problem is the author of the article is looking for intellectual capital in public schools (High school? , community colleges?).

    In any case, R2 wouldn't know intellectual capital if gave him a headache.

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from Sistersledge. Show Sistersledge's posts

    Re: Part 2: the hubris of progressives

    1 ...... Kb7

    2 ...... Se7

    3 ...... Ka7

    4 ...... Sc8

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from ronreganfan. Show ronreganfan's posts

    Re: Part 2: the hubris of progressives

    I guess I found those who either are, or married to public school teachers.

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from ronreganfan. Show ronreganfan's posts

    Re: Part 2: the hubris of progressives

    In response to DirtyWaterLover's comment:

    I always thought "intellectual capital" was forged at universities - private and public.  Maybe the problem is the author of the article is looking for intellectual capital in public schools (High school? , community colleges?).

    In any case, R2 wouldn't know intellectual capital if gave him a headache.



    Did I write this article?

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from high-road. Show high-road's posts

    Re: Part 2: the hubris of progressives

    Study: It's Your Fault Your Kids Are Dumb

    About half of kids' learning ability is in their DNA, study says.

    http://www.latimes.com/science/sciencenow/la-sci-sn-math-reading-genes-20140711-story.html

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from ronreganfan. Show ronreganfan's posts

    Re: Part 2: the hubris of progressives

    In response to high-road's comment:

    Study: It's Your Fault Your Kids Are Dumb

    About half of kids' learning ability is in their DNA, study says.

    http://www.latimes.com/science/sciencenow/la-sci-sn-math-reading-genes-20140711-story.html" rel="nofollow">http://www.latimes.com/science/sciencenow/la-sci-sn-math-reading-genes-20140711-story.html



    The other half is squandered in public schools by union teacher, that, save for the unions, would be walmart greeters.

     
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  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from ronreganfan. Show ronreganfan's posts

    Re: Part 2: the hubris of progressives

    In response to high-road's comment:

    In response to ronreganfan's comment:

    In response to high-road's comment:



    The other half is squandered in public schools by union teacher, that, save for the unions, would be walmart greeters.




    What are you complaining about?

    Book learnin is something that only those libruls elites do to prove how smaht they are ... you salt-of-the-earth wingnuts ain't got no use for book learnin.



    How..elitist of you.

    you must really hold your nose when you travel to Worchester, or other far-flung colonies of the empire.

     
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  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from sprague1953. Show sprague1953's posts

    Re: Part 2: the hubris of progressives

    I know, as you said, you did not write the article.

    So, rrfan, what is it that you advocate to improve the education of our children and why?

     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from DirtyWaterLover. Show DirtyWaterLover's posts

    Re: Part 2: the hubris of progressives

    In response to ronreganfan's comment:

    In response to high-road's comment:



    The other half is squandered in public schools by union teacher, that, save for the unions, would be walmart greeters.



    Guessing you went to public school

     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from ronreganfan. Show ronreganfan's posts

    Re: Part 2: the hubris of progressives

    In response to DirtyWaterLover's comment:


    yes, I did. I survived the very lackluster experience of a government education, and corrected it with old fashioned hard work, leading to a successful career and good life despite it.

    Looks like you are a government worker, taking money from the tax payer then kicking them in the teeth when they say you are taking food off their table.


    that is where we are at. The middle class, the supposed jewel of the left, goes hungry so you can retire at fifty with an obscene pension.


    now, I don't fault you for your sanctimonious position, caged birds often think that way.

     
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  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from devildavid. Show devildavid's posts

    Re: Part 2: the hubris of progressives

    I do think that public schools have gone downhill over time. But I'm not sure it's just the public schools that are worse, and not the private schools as well. Part of the problem is how technology has replaced some things students use to have to work harder at. Armed with calculators and computers, some brain development may get lost. Do they even drill students in their times tables anymore, even at private schools? Do they teach the basics of reading and writing without the help of spellcheck and computer programs? Do any schools do this? I really don't know, but I suspect that technology has had a major impact in the teaching of some of the fundamental skills anyone needs to learn, to actually be able to use their brain and not the electronic devices attached to their hands.


    Now the other issue is this. If we eliminate public education, we will be eliminating education completely for certain income levels. Where will they get the money to pay for a private school? And especially how does anyone afford college anymore? Will these private schools be given subsidies? Will the market really be able to provide education that is affordable for enough people? Many of the same problems will remain. Poor areas will have poor or no education, rich areas will do better. How does this really solve the problem?


    It is a false utopian idea that the private market can do everything better for the general welfare without some help from taxation and government.

     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from ronreganfan. Show ronreganfan's posts

    Re: Part 2: the hubris of progressives

    In response to devildavid's comment:


    I do think that public schools have gone downhill over time. But I'm not sure it's just the public schools that are worse, and not the private schools as well. Part of the problem is how technology has replaced some things students use to have to work harder at. Armed with calculators and computers, some brain development may get lost. Do they even drill students in their times tables anymore, even at private schools? Do they teach the basics of reading and writing without the help of spellcheck and computer programs? Do any schools do this? I really don't know, but I suspect that technology has had a major impact in the teaching of some of the fundamental skills anyone needs to learn, to actually be able to use their brain and not the electronic devices attached to their hands.


     


    Now the other issue is this. If we eliminate public education, we will be eliminating education completely for certain income levels. Where will they get the money to pay for a private school? And especially how does anyone afford college anymore? Will these private schools be given subsidies? Will the market really be able to provide education that is affordable for enough people? Many of the same problems will remain. Poor areas will have poor or no education, rich areas will do better. How does this really solve the problem?


     


    It is a false utopian idea that the private market can do everything better for the general welfare without some help from taxation and government.




    Good points.


    i would say public investment in education is needed, but should be minimal.  If you want more for your child, get a second job to pay for education outside of the basics.


    i would also point out that the same technology you reference as impeding brain development is the  tool to replace much of education.  Think of the internet. It is accessible to all, self paced, and limitless in terms of subject matter.  and best of all, don't need no stinkin teachers. (Joke).

     
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