Reducing dependence on foreign oil

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from BobinVa. Show BobinVa's posts

    Reducing dependence on foreign oil

    La. Sen Vitter (yes, the senator who had a sex scandal) :

    "A little more than two short years ago we heard presidential candidates vowing to fight to prevent rapid spikes in gas prices at the pump. Well, here we are again not too far in the future and $4.00 per gallon gas could be right around the corner. Like you, I’m hardly surprised.

    The unrest in the Middle East should really clarify for President Obama that we can no longer remain dependent on foreign oil, especially from countries run by bad actors like Muammar Gaddafi. Unfortunately, the administration seems stubbornly resolved to halt American domestic energy production in its tracks to appease their radical environmentalist agenda.

    I’m introducing new legislation in the near future that will reduce our dependence on foreign oil – from countries like Libya – by finally unshackling our own domestic energy sector from excessive regulation, while also directing a portion of those revenues to continued funding for alternative and renewable resources. Renewables and alternative fuels may be the future, but only our current administration has fooled itself into thinking these potential alternative fuels are right around the corner. We need our traditional energy resources as a bridge to help free us from dependence on foreign sources and sudden price fluctuations caused by uncontrollable world events."

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from lawboy. Show lawboy's posts

    Re: Reducing dependence on foreign oil

    It needs to be done. Natural gas would be the way to go here in states. I wish someone would make a car that would run it.

    * I live in country and got off heating oil 5 years ago. I have an outside wood boiler that heats my house and water. I feel good knowing I'm not spend my money on foreign oil. Now if I could run my truck on wood I'd be really happy.


     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from RevWright. Show RevWright's posts

    Re: Reducing dependence on foreign oil

    Ohh NOW that the middle east is imploding does Obama figure out that we must reduce our dependency. dumbazz POS-OTUS.
    He sure tried at being all thing to all people.

    We have the resources.. and also the eco-nutcases to prevent us from using them.
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from DamainAllen. Show DamainAllen's posts

    Re: Reducing dependence on foreign oil

    Why does he keep highlighting Libya, a country that we are hardly reliant on?  Less than 3% of US oil comes from there.  The folks truly dependent on Libya are the europeans.  And less regulation?  Pffft. We saw how that worked out last summer, and again recentlyt with another BP accident that killed more workers. 
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from massmoderateJoe. Show massmoderateJoe's posts

    Re: Reducing dependence on foreign oil

    Needs to happen agressively.  Sen Vitter is 100% on the mark.
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from JustWords. Show JustWords's posts

    Re: Reducing dependence on foreign oil

    Natural gas is going to be necessary, but in the end, it can't close the gap.

    Nor will offshore drilling.

    Supply is going to drop faster than people seem to be aware.

    Nucelar is also absolutely necessary.

    But really, it's all too little too late.

    There's giong to be a rather rough adjustment in the next 20-40 years, and it will start with massive price increases in oil, and you'll feel it hard in areas like the grocery bill quite quickly.

    The IEA charts on this are rather unsettling.

    We should have started this adjustment at LEAST 20 years ago, but guys like Bob were too busy scoffing at geologists to give a darn.  Now, suddenly, it's Obama's fault. 

    The REAL no brainer, is limits on conspumption.  But of course, our economic model is premised on continual growth... somewhere, we smash our little heads into real limits and problems.


    Welcome to the future!


     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from massmoderateJoe. Show massmoderateJoe's posts

    Re: Reducing dependence on foreign oil

    In Response to Re: Reducing dependence on foreign oil:
    [QUOTE]It needs to be done. Natural gas would be the way to go here in states. I wish someone would make a car that would run it. * I live in country and got off heating oil 5 years ago. I have an outside wood boiler that heats my house and water. I feel good knowing I'm not spend my money on foreign oil. Now if I could run my truck on wood I'd be really happy. www.centralboiler.com/applications.php " />
    Posted by lawboy[/QUOTE]

    Sounds great, but do you have a smoke cloud over your house on low cloud cover days.  In some parts of the country you aren't allowed to fire up your fireplace never mind a wood boiler.

     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from StalkingButler. Show StalkingButler's posts

    Re: Reducing dependence on foreign oil

    In Response to Re: Reducing dependence on foreign oil:
    [QUOTE]It needs to be done. Natural gas would be the way to go here in states. I wish someone would make a car that would run it. * I live in country and got off heating oil 5 years ago. I have an outside wood boiler that heats my house and water. I feel good knowing I'm not spend my money on foreign oil. Now if I could run my truck on wood I'd be really happy. www.centralboiler.com/applications.php " />
    Posted by lawboy[/QUOTE]

    I would love to do that. I'd also love to have a small windmill and some solar panels and be able to get off the grid entirely. Unfortunately that isn't happening for most of us anytime soon.

    Short term solution: Use our own oil and gas reserves as much as possilble. Start building new nuclear plants.

    Long term solution: Technology. Keep funding it until we get economically feasible fusion, solar, wind, bio, and hydrogen technologies.


     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from lawboy. Show lawboy's posts

    Re: Reducing dependence on foreign oil

    New York has established zoning restrictions on the boilers. They can't be in any village or urban areas and have to at minimum 250 feet from your neighbor. Along with stack height and no garbage burning. They are alot of work, but having my house at 76 degrees and water hot enough to make coffee from the tap is worth it.

    it's not the answer obviously, but cleaner wood/organic burning is area that needs to be look at. Pellet stoves that burn grass, corn,wood can be used in urban areas but requires work, more than just turning up the thermostat.
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from lawboy. Show lawboy's posts

    Re: Reducing dependence on foreign oil

    Yes Greg I saw that announcement. Not happy about it either. Nuke power scares me, oil is finite. What is the answer?
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from lawboy. Show lawboy's posts

    Re: Reducing dependence on foreign oil

    In Response to Re: Reducing dependence on foreign oil:
    [QUOTE]It needs to be done. Natural gas would be the way to go here in states. I wish someone would make a car that would run it. ---------------------- Cool idea, but there's Boyles Law and the Hindenberg thing.
    Posted by GreginMeffa[/QUOTE]

    I see Honda makes a natural gas powered car.
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from JustWords. Show JustWords's posts

    Re: Reducing dependence on foreign oil

    In Response to Re: Reducing dependence on foreign oil:
    [QUOTE]Yes Greg I saw that announcement. Not happy about it either. Nuke power scares me, oil is finite. What is the answer?
    Posted by lawboy[/QUOTE]


    Scale down how we live.

    Conserve what he have.

    Take the nuclear plunge.

    Pray for innovation.

    Oh- and get a good bike. 

    The permaculture movement deserves our attention, I think.  I'm new to it, but I can't think of a more prudent present path.


     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from dazydo. Show dazydo's posts

    Re: Reducing dependence on foreign oil

    In Response to Re: Reducing dependence on foreign oil:
    [QUOTE]It needs to be done. Natural gas would be the way to go here in states. I wish someone would make a car that would run it. * I live in country and got off heating oil 5 years ago. I have an outside wood boiler that heats my house and water. I feel good knowing I'm not spend my money on foreign oil. Now if I could run my truck on wood I'd be really happy. www.centralboiler.com/applications.php " />
    Posted by lawboy[/QUOTE]

    Um, first and foremost, you are a liar about your house.  Go take a photo of it and post it on this board.  Any nimrod can pull an image of of the internet to make a phoney claim, and pretend to be all high and mighty.

    Secondly, there are thousands of local government vehicles that run on natural gas, and a lot of cities are adopting programs for cabs that run on natural gas only.  Maybe if you read up on the subject a little more, you'd be better informed.

    Thirdly, you probably don't even own a truck, but hey, that's OK for someone named "law-boy".
     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from kelldog1. Show kelldog1's posts

    Re: Reducing dependence on foreign oil



       Just a thought........

       If only we could somehow capture all the "hot-air" produced by right wing pundits,then we'd be able to power this nation for generations! Maybe conservative talkshow hosts are good for something after all!

     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from lawboy. Show lawboy's posts

    Re: Reducing dependence on foreign oil

    In Response to Re: Reducing dependence on foreign oil:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: Reducing dependence on foreign oil : Um, first and foremost, you are a liar about your house.  Go take a photo of it and post it on this board.  Any nimrod can pull an image of of the internet to make a phoney claim, and pretend to be all high and mighty. Secondly, there are thousands of local government vehicles that run on natural gas, and a lot of cities are adopting programs for cabs that run on natural gas only.  Maybe if you read up on the subject a little more, you'd be better informed. Thirdly, you probably don't even own a truck, but hey, that's OK for someone named "law-boy".
    Posted by dazydo[/QUOTE]


    UM NOPE not lying. HA HAHAHA burning wood makes me high and mighty.

    Lawboy was created to mock law on the sox board

    DAZYDO? you should embarrassed with that name  DAZYDO LOL!

     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from sk8ter2008. Show sk8ter2008's posts

    Re: Reducing dependence on foreign oil

    In Response to Re: Reducing dependence on foreign oil:
    [QUOTE]Natural gas is going to be necessary, but in the end, it can't close the gap. Nor will offshore drilling. Supply is going to drop faster than people seem to be aware. Nucelar is also absolutely necessary. But really, it's all too little too late. There's giong to be a rather rough adjustment in the next 20-40 years, and it will start with massive price increases in oil, and you'll feel it hard in areas like the grocery bill quite quickly. The IEA charts on this are rather unsettling. We should have started this adjustment at LEAST 20 years ago, but guys like Bob were too busy scoffing at geologists to give a darn.  Now, suddenly, it's Obama's fault.  The REAL no brainer, is limits on conspumption.  But of course, our economic model is premised on continual growth... somewhere, we smash our little heads into real limits and problems. Welcome to the future!
    Posted by JustWords[/QUOTE]

    The rough adjustment can be greatly reduced (assuming alternatives work out in 20-30 years). We have enough coal if, the USA relaxed the regulations and started issuing permits to drill, along with allowing the building of Nuclear power plants we could be independent from foreign oil in a decade.

    All the while we continue looking for alternatives!!

    Why not?????
     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from MattyScornD. Show MattyScornD's posts

    Re: Reducing dependence on foreign oil

    Maybe we can finally get the other major party in this country on board with the threat of climate change, instead of them denying the science and the evidence out-of-hand...

    ...but I won't hold my breath, so...

    the republicans can continue not to believe in what everyone else knows as fact, as long as they embrace the need for serious investments in non-fossil fuel technology and modern upgrades to the grid.

    Kinda hard to do when house repubs are trying hard to decimate the EPA, eliminate regulations against mercury poisoning, water poisoning, air pollution, greenhouse gasses, and basically undo 40 years of common sense environmental legislation, etc., etc.
     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from BobinVa. Show BobinVa's posts

    Re: Reducing dependence on foreign oil

    "serious investments in non-fossil fuel technology and modern upgrades to the grid."

    "Investments" = payoffs of bilions to corrupt government insiders...
     Billions have been flushed down that green toilet bowl since the Carter Administration....

    Go buy a VOLT, Matty... invest in the Obama future. Surely you trust the hard work of union labor, it must be worth 41K.

    Drill, baby drill...we have plenty of domestic supplies of oil....if we go get it..
     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from BobinVa. Show BobinVa's posts

    Re: Reducing dependence on foreign oil

    red state:
    "Public acceptance of proven energy sources (coal, oil, nuclear) is being replaced by this calamitous stumble-all-over-yourself “green energy” movement. And “green energy” has come to trump biodiversity, conservation, and spatial ecology (not to mention common sense). Brazil, for example, is praised for its non-dependence on oil, even if that means that it’s clearing its forests at a rate I won’t even begin to describe, to grow fuel–and that’s just the start of it.

    Rooftop solar panels offer promising technology, but large-scale reflector plants almost always wind up in the most sensitive wildlife habitats, contributing piddly amounts of energy to ‘the grid’ at a whacked-out, way out of proportion cost-benefit ratio. Windmills require vast amounts of cleared land to twirl (on the good days, in the good seasons), and are responsible for countless bird and bat deaths, often affecting the larger and more endangered species.
    ‘Super clever’ ideas like wave-powered electricity (ocean waves, that is) would be abhorrently destructive of marine wildlife, obstructing migration routes and marine mammal communication–and that’s the least of it. You want sterile, shark free coasts? Wave harvesters might just be your technology.

    And did I mention biofuels? Ethanol, anyone? It’s shaping up to be a bigger disaster than the cash crop system, and if we continue on this 10% business, or God forbid, make it twenty, forests will fall and food prices will rise into the prohibitively expensive zone, particularly for those living on “less than $1 a day.”

    The point is that “green fuels” are anything but, at best responsible for negligible emissions reduction from automobile tailpipes. Windmills are horribly destructive to wildlife and wild places, already responsible (in their mission to achieve .25% of total electricity production in the United States) for permanently stripping mountainsides to create the open space, roads, and infrastructure required .

     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from DamainAllen. Show DamainAllen's posts

    Re: Reducing dependence on foreign oil

    Well that settles it.  We'll just keep drilling until its all gone, THEN we'll figure out what to do for alternatives.  With a plan like that we're sure to succeed. 
     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from BobinVa. Show BobinVa's posts

    Re: Reducing dependence on foreign oil

    In Response to Re: Reducing dependence on foreign oil:
    [QUOTE]Well that settles it.  We'll just keep drilling until its all gone, THEN we'll figure out what to do for alternatives.  With a plan like that we're sure to succeed. 
    Posted by DamainAllen[/QUOTE]

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) released a report in April 2008 that suggested the Bakken Formation in Montana and North Dakota could produce between 3.0 and 4.3 billion barrels of recoverable oil in its field of approximately 200,000 square miles (520,000 square kilometers). This oil is not among the proven oil reserves now counted for the United States.

    Land in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, in Alaska, has also been considered for recoverable oil. Such oil could amount to between 5.7 and 16.0 billion barrels.

    In addition, the United States contains the largest known deposits of oil shale in the world. The U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM) estimates that 2,500 billion barrels (2.5 trillion barrels) of potentially recoverable oil is available. Such an amount, under current usage rates, would last for over one hundred years. Since oil shale reserves is not a commercially viable venture, as of yet, they are not included within the U.S. proven oil reserves...
    "Investments" in accessing the oil shale reserves should trump the far fetched loony 'green' technology....

     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from DamainAllen. Show DamainAllen's posts

    Re: Reducing dependence on foreign oil

    Bob, you do understand the concept of finite resources don't you? 

    Finding more oil is great for the short and intermediate term, however, punting on identifying alternatives until out childrens children have to face a reality of hyper priced oil, or worse yet no oil is pretty much dooming future Earth to periods of instability and global aggression unseen since the end of WWII. 

    The reflexive opposition to "green" alternatives is simply for the benefit of the politicians we have NOW, and I will stipulate that some of the alternatives are not going to to be viable, particularly biofuels, as the trade offs are harmful especially when crops are concerned.  But the point isn't to find, refine, and implement an alternative that will be viable RIGHT NOW.  It will take years and involve more than just energy concerns, but also how goods are moved, how automobiles are made, how people live, etc.  This partisan pushback is most harmful to those who haven't been born yet and its all for the benefit of a handful of companies and countries who will do anything to protect their golden goose.
     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from sk8ter2008. Show sk8ter2008's posts

    Re: Reducing dependence on foreign oil

    Man made climate change, global warming caused by man's activities, etc etc. Are nothing more than another ponzi scheme set forth by the powerful to try and milk the population through fear of dire consequences if we don't pay more!!!!

    PERIOD!!

     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from JustWords. Show JustWords's posts

    Re: Reducing dependence on foreign oil

    In Response to Re: Reducing dependence on foreign oil:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: Reducing dependence on foreign oil : The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) released a report in April 2008 that suggested the Bakken Formation in Montana and North Dakota could produce between 3.0 and 4.3 billion barrels of recoverable oil in its field of approximately 200,000 square miles (520,000 square kilometers). This oil is not among the proven oil reserves now counted for the United States. Land in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge , in Alaska, has also been considered for recoverable oil. Such oil could amount to between 5.7 and 16.0 billion barrels. In addition, the United States contains the largest known deposits of oil shale in the world. The U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM) estimates that 2,500 billion barrels (2.5 trillion barrels) of potentially recoverable oil is available. Such an amount, under current usage rates, would last for over one hundred years. Since oil shale reserves is not a commercially viable venture, as of yet, they are not included within the U.S. proven oil reserves... "Investments" in accessing the oil shale reserves should trump the far fetched loony 'green' technology....
    Posted by BobinVa[/QUOTE]

    You really are the captain who wants to go down with his ship...

    Everybody acknowledges Peak by now.  Peak is not about running out - it's about demand outstripping supply, as well as the idea that extraction rates will fall off.  Of course, it's also about the fact that indeed, even with these 'non-conventional' sources, projections made by everyone from the IEA, to the DOE, to the Army, show those 'others' being insufficient to close the gap.  Those fields may mitigate the decline, but by no means can they stop it.

    And this doesn't even touch the devastating environmental effects involved in extracting these alternative sources.

    It's time to accept the fact my friend.  Don't let this catch you unprepared. 
     
  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from skeeter20. Show skeeter20's posts

    Re: Reducing dependence on foreign oil

    In Response to Re: Reducing dependence on foreign oil:
    [QUOTE]It needs to be done. Natural gas would be the way to go here in states. I wish someone would make a car that would run it. * I live in country and got off heating oil 5 years ago. I have an outside wood boiler that heats my house and water. I feel good knowing I'm not spend my money on foreign oil. Now if I could run my truck on wood I'd be really happy. www.centralboiler.com/applications.php " />
    Posted by lawboy[/QUOTE]

    Although I support you in burning wood, those outside boilers are big polluters.  I looked into them. 

    Try greasel for your truck.
     
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